Evaporator Coil Pan Replacement


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Old 06-08-20, 01:14 PM
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Evaporator Coil Pan Replacement

Hi. I saw my AC was leaking from the coil compartment so I removed the panel and saw the drip pan has corroded through. The AC works fine, although it's about 15 years old.

Can the drip pan be replaced without replacing the entire coil/condenser unit? How much should something like this cost? And why are these things made of metal and not plastic???

Thanks.
 
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Old 06-08-20, 01:44 PM
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They are metal and can be replaced.

Cost depends a lot on where you get it from, it's just a piece of sheet metal but if you have it fabricated and installed would be cheaper than if a HVAC company made and installed!
 
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Old 06-08-20, 06:03 PM
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I discovered a hole in mine when a small damp spot appeared on my ceiling.

Mine cost around $100 a few years a go. I drew it up on a piece of paper w/all the dimensions and dropped it off at a sheet metal place.

Mine actually was out of level when it sat flat so it had to fill up a bit before the water reached the drain hole. I designed a couple of legs to provide a slight angle to correct for the unlevel platform. Now if water ever drips, it'll run to the drain hole side first.
 
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Old 06-09-20, 11:35 AM
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Thanks. This doesn't seem like a DIY project since the coil needs to be removed and pan replaced. That requires removing the R22 from the system, cutting and soldering pipes. You did that all yourself?
 
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Old 06-09-20, 01:15 PM
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No, I was talking about the drip pan that sits underneath the unit. Are you talking about parts of the sheet metal of the unit itself?

On mine the condensate drains onto a plastic tray (inside the evap enclosure) that feeds to a drain that is attached to the unit. My main drain plugged. So the condensate filled the plastic tray a bit, it then is designed to drain to a tray that sits under the unit to catch water if the main drain ever gets plugged. This tray is physically independent of the unit. It also has it's own drain. On mine when the main drain plugged it continually fed condensate onto this tray which eventually rusted out thus leaked onto my ceiling. Unfortunately it never produced enough condensate to drain out the secondary drain (my tray was tilted away from the secondary drain) which is over the family room window so it can be seen.

Back to you, if the enclosure is rusted out not sure what you can do. Sounds like yours is in a vertical config, whereas mine was horizontal.
 
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Old 06-09-20, 02:39 PM
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since the coil needs to be removed
You dont remove the coil ,just work around it!
 
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Old 06-09-20, 07:24 PM
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Yes.... sometimes the coil needs to be lifted or removed. It is NOT easy to replace a factory drip pan. That is the pan and case in one. Not much of a chance of getting one from the manufacturer either.

Your A coil is showing signs of major rusting too.

Overflow pans are a completely different matter as they sit BELOW the drip pan.
 
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Old 06-10-20, 11:33 AM
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Can I pour some flex seal in the pan and hope for the best?
 
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Old 06-10-20, 11:36 AM
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That might work. You'll probably need to remove any loose rust and dry the area.
 
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Old 06-10-20, 12:57 PM
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Before using any patching products I would also check to see if it is compatible with high temperatures. Remember that evaporator pan is not only there during the cooling season but also during the winter. It sits above your heat exchanger which gets very hot. "Flex Seal" is not for high temperature use according to their information. Newer pans are plastic and I replaced a couple this year that were leaking due to being melted by over-heated furnaces.
I could be wrong, but by the looks of it you have a cased coil which usually has a track that the pan slides into and gets secured. This, and other hurdles will further complicate removing the pan from the coil itself if you opt for that route. Good luck in any direction you go.
 
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Old 06-12-20, 04:32 PM
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Going to try to seal it myself. Also got an estimate to replace the A coil and pan but keeping the condenser (R22) $1600. Decent price?
 
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Old 06-12-20, 09:26 PM
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I'm guessing changing the air handler but keeping the condenser.
The system is approx 15 years old. I'd say $1600 is slightly on the higher end of the price.
A typical coil only replacement runs approx $1000.

It's hard to pull the trigger on a repair like that because at 15 years.... it's almost time for a complete replacement.
 
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Old 06-13-20, 08:33 AM
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Thanks for the help. I put silicone around the edge where I saw the leak let it cure overnight then poured flex seal in the pan. Well see what happens.
 
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Old 06-14-20, 10:48 AM
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well, it stopped the visible leak. But I tested the pan and its leaking, but I cant see from where.

so now I can replace the a coil and pan for $1600 or replace the whole system for about $6000.

its 15 years old. Id prefer to just do the A coil since the ac was cooling just fine.

Thoughts on which way to go?
 
 

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