A/C float switch issue

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Old 09-29-20, 02:28 PM
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A/C float switch issue

hi all, have a couple questions regarding float switches. less than a year ago i had a pancake style a/c unit installed in a condo i own. just recently the drain pan overflowed and flooded the condo unit. question #1, how come the float switch did not shut off the a/c? i tested the float sw and it works, but it did no work when installed? #2 what is best a horiz or vert mounted fl sw? what brand is best. i need to do something to prevent this from happening again. plz help.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 03:26 PM
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Tell us more about your setup or post a picture..... How-to-insert-pictures.
Where is the float switch ?

If the unit is installed in a location where if it leaked it could cause damage.... it should have a secondary or overflow pan under the entire unit. The float would be attached to the overflow pan.

If you don't have an overflow pan then the float should be installed in the secondary or overflow drain line.

There are only a few companies making float switches and they are basically premium switches.
Maybe yours wasn't connected properly.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 04:27 PM
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the float switch is mounted next to the drain line(SS2). pancake style a/c units only have one rather small drain pan due to space constraints. the float switch works if i remove it and turn it upside down. why it didnt work when needed is a mystery to me.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 04:48 PM
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A picture would still be very helpful.

I have a feeling where you have it mounted the water didn't rise high enough to trip it.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 04:53 PM
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its mounted in the convential place. there is two cutouts on the drain pan, one is for the drain line the other for the float switch. how do you know where to mount it? i cant see much of the pan, its mostly covered.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 05:12 PM
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By cutouts..... do you mean 3/4" threaded holes for connecting the drains ?
If that's a yes..... one drain line is lower than the other. The lower fitting is the primary drain and the higher one is the secondary or overflow. Typically the float switch would get installed directly in the overflow port. That means the float must be set to the maximum sensitivity because the water won't rise much in that fitting before equaling the top of the drain pan.



In-drain float switch manual pdf
 
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Old 09-29-20, 05:27 PM
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yes, two threaded holes. its in the proper hole. how do you adjust? where else would you suggest i mount a switch?
 
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Old 09-29-20, 06:13 PM
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You should be able to adjust the float down so that only a minimum of water is required to trip it.
The other way to connect it so that it works more reliably is to cut the primary drain line and install a tee.
The tee would point up and the float switch would sit in the top of the tee. The two ends of the tee that connect to the pipe are glued. The switch is only pressed in place.
 
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Old 09-29-20, 06:39 PM
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any idea on why the sw did not trip? also, how many sw can you wire in series?
 
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Old 09-29-20, 07:50 PM
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I drew a diagram. There are two drain lines. The primary is always lower than the secondary.
The blue line is the normal water level when the primary drain is working.
The green line is the water level when the primary drain is plugged.
The red line is the water level needed to overflow the internal pan.

The float needs to get enough water to actually float. So the water level rose to the point it overflowed the drip pan but not high enough to trip the float. So putting the float switch in the primary line will expose it to a higher water level.

You can put as many switches as you want in series.
 
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Old 09-30-20, 06:38 AM
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so, i should put the float switch in the primary line.
 
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Old 09-30-20, 10:01 AM
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Hi, the switch may have worked, was it wired into the control circuit correctly?

Geo 🇺🇸
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 10-02-20 at 07:47 AM.
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Old 09-30-20, 11:40 AM
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yes, it must be wired correctly, because it shuts off if you manually trip it.
 
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