Rheem Compressor Not Spinning 16 Years - Replace?


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Old 04-10-21, 05:55 PM
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Rheem Compressor Not Spinning 16 Years - Replace?

The HVAC was serviced last May and the technician said the system had a leak and R22 was added for $400. Now, the compressor isn't working and the unit is 16 years old. Does it make sense to just replace it given the age and I'm already $400 invested. The unit has a 'switch/fuse' on the exterior and one at the fuse panel. Both were switched on/off and no change.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 07:24 PM
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I would get it diagnosed.
If youíve had to add refrigerant, thereís a leak. And the $400 worth of refrigerant will just leak back out.
I wouldnít invest much money into a unit that old.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 07:42 PM
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That's not the main issue given compressor won't work. Isn't 16 years end of life?
 
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Old 04-10-21, 08:28 PM
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Depends on location. But it’s getting up there.
If all the refrigerant leaked out, and your unit doesn’t have a pressure switch, the compressor could be damaged from running without a charge. Or it could be a simple capacitor.
 
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Old 04-10-21, 08:30 PM
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New R22, repair leak, and compressor doesn't work. And, new AC have 2 stage and a rebate. Might be worth just dumping it.
 
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Old 04-12-21, 04:55 AM
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Hi, has anyone checked to be sure the Stat is calling for cooling, is there 24 volts to the compressor contactor, is the condenser fan spinning? something to check before you trash it, 16 years is a good life.
Geo🇺🇸
 
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Old 04-23-21, 01:16 PM
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HVAC guy found a broken wire that ran from the house to the fan. It is now working but he said it is 'low' on refrigerant. He said he could add sealant and more refrigerant but unclear how long that will last. Could be months/years or days. It lasted an entire year after recharging the system last May (w/o sealant) but I don't want to dump $500 a year. He said I could 1) Recharge w/ sealant for $500 max. 2) Run it until the refrigerant leaks out and it stops working 3) Replaced w/ Rudd for $3500-$4000 for 13 or 16 seer.

I am inclined to let it run till it dies but I believe prices are on the rise given summer is coming.
 
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Old 04-23-21, 01:22 PM
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I'm not a big fan of sealants.
Has he tried to locate the leak ?
Most techs carry a sniffer that can be used.

My Rheem is close to 30 years old and has never needed refrigerant.
I've only replaced the contactor and the capacitor.
 
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Old 04-23-21, 01:32 PM
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No he didnít. I didnít think to ask
 
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Old 04-23-21, 01:42 PM
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I’d try and find the leak.
Those leak seal in a bottle products, can often destroy a system. Requiring replacement of everything including the lineset.
 
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Old 04-23-21, 08:31 PM
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Does it really make sense to put more monies into a 16 year old unit? And, can you find leak via visual inspection or need a tool?

I got a decent quote relative to the others:

RUDD 3TON 13SEER $3525
RUUD 3TON 16SEER $3930
 
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Old 04-24-21, 06:03 AM
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Addressing your 1st question. Will you be comfortable with a unit more prone to break down which an older unit will be? Compare it to an older car. 2nd question, Yes. As the price of R-22 increased I found myself responding to more calls with people in the same situation as you, -wanting a second opinion and a price for an install-. Even though I have a couple refrigerant detectors I began using leak testing bubbles on the "shrader valves" before I even hooked up my gauges. It became a habit that I would never check pressures without bubble checking first. I was amazed at the number of leaky valves I found that would often go undetected. When you put gauges on you can seat or seal leaky valves as well as the reverse. Almost all condensers have schader valves. Their cores look just like the valve you would spit on your bicycle tire to see if it was leaking. Using dish soap would better even though they make bubbles specifically for this process. Naturally shraders are not the only place a leak can occur, but they are a common place that requires no special tool(s). If you find either to be a problem then a special tool would be required to change the core without illegally dumping the whole charge.
 
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Old 04-24-21, 07:13 PM
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While the A/C is running, spray with soapy water? How do you address the leaks once found?
 
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Old 04-24-21, 08:12 PM
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I’d try and find the leak.
Those leak seal in a bottle products, can often destroy a system. Requiring replacement of everything including the lineset.
Been there done that with an old R-12 car system about 5 years ago that sucked I then had the whole AC converted to R-134A that was not cheap to do joke is they build the vehicle around the heater core & AC evaporator and this seems to be true as the whole dash board and most interior parts have to be remove to get to them
 
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Old 04-25-21, 06:25 AM
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While the A/C is running, spray with soapy water? How do you address the leaks once found?
Either leak detection spray or an electronic detector are used. If the leak isnít visible or is in a coil then an electronic detector must be used.
The leak is either brazed closed or the leaking part, such as a coil, is replaced.
 
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Old 04-25-21, 06:35 AM
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If you saw where the gauges were attached to your condenser then you saw where the shraders should be located. Use dish soap to determine if those valve(s) are leaking., - I would suggest that the system be off to equalize line pressures- If bubbles form then leak(s) are present. Correcting a leaky shrader core by replacement requires a tool meant just for that, and the knowledge how to use it without dumping the entire charge. It would also require checking and adding refrigerant if necessary. Neither should be done by an unlicensed person. Your question was if you could find a leak via visual inspection, sometimes yes. Can you address or repair it yourself, probably no.
If weighing the pro/cons of sealant use, consider that you have a system that will likely be in a scrap pile if it isn't sealed. Harming it really shouldn't be high in the "con" column. The line-set, if reused, can be blown out with a cleaning agent if the installing company should feel it necessary. Don't take my comments as an endorsement for sealants. But, on occasional situations I have found them effective for less than permanent repair. Do I keep it on the truck, yes as an option. Do I keep more than one, no, because it's rarely used and takes too long to educate an owner so they are making an informed risk. Usually the time and labor spent on an old system is best applied on a new replacement. Especially if it involves going from R-22 to R-410a.
 
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Old 04-27-21, 06:58 AM
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That's not the main issue given compressor won't work. Isn't 16 years end of life?
16 years is good for modern stuff but my Aunt had an old central HVAC with AC from the early 1970's that was still working when she sold the house 3 years ago so as they say "they don't make them like that anymore"

I don't know if you got it fixed yet but I have in the past used a mallet to gently tap the top of the compressor that will usually free it if it is in fact a mechanical issue, and not electrical or grounded out. However I would still save for a new system as this "fix" usually does not last long if it even works.

If you saw where the gauges were attached to your condenser then you saw where the shraders should be located. Use dish soap to determine if those valve(s) are leaking., - I would suggest that the system be off to equalize line pressures- If bubbles form then leak(s) are present. Correcting a leaky shrader core by replacement requires a tool meant just for that, and the knowledge how to use it without dumping the entire charge. It would also require checking and adding refrigerant if necessary. Neither should be done by an unlicensed person. Your question was if you could find a leak via visual inspection, sometimes yes. Can you address or repair it yourself, probably no.
If weighing the pro/cons of sealant use, consider that you have a system that will likely be in a scrap pile if it isn't sealed. Harming it really shouldn't be high in the "con" column. The line-set, if reused, can be blown out with a cleaning agent if the installing company should feel it necessary. Don't take my comments as an endorsement for sealants. But, on occasional situations I have found them effective for less than permanent repair. Do I keep it on the truck, yes as an option. Do I keep more than one, no, because it's rarely used and takes too long to educate an owner so they are making an informed risk. Usually the time and labor spent on an old system is best applied on a new replacement. Especially if it involves going from R-22 to R-410a.
I see most leaks in the evaporator inside the houses air handler and second is the line-set and shrader cores like you said.
 
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Old Yesterday, 08:58 AM
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There's a $100 difference between the RUUD 16SEER and York 17SEER. Should I confirm model # or does it not matter much? Is it worth it to upgrade to 17SEER?
 
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Old Yesterday, 10:43 AM
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Of those two units..... I'd favor the Rheem/Ruud unit.
 
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Old Yesterday, 10:51 AM
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Not knowing model #s and the 17 SEER (1 SEER isnt that much)?
 
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Old Yesterday, 11:01 AM
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I wouldn't be overly concerned with 1 SEER.
Who gives the better warranty ?
 
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Old Yesterday, 11:03 AM
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They are both 10 year parts.
 
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Old Yesterday, 11:06 AM
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I'd still opt for the Ruud unit. Be sure to register your system.
Many techs say they'll do it..... and don't. It's easy to do online.
 
 

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