Propane powered A/C


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Old 04-18-21, 10:19 AM
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Propane powered A/C

I need to get a propane powered A/C unit to cool a small room (12 x 20). I understand such things exist but I can't find much about it on the web.

Any suggestions?

PS: Also whether double host or single - they all seem to connect to the outside via a window. Can't they attach to my duct opening (used for the central A/C). In this case, I have no central A/C - only the vent.
 
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Old 04-18-21, 10:31 AM
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I have moved your post to its own thread so that it gets the attention that it deserves. In most cases, it is better to post your own thread instead of tacking onto another.

I have never heard or seen an A/C unit that is powered by propane. Why propane? Do you not have electricity available where you are?
 
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Old 04-18-21, 11:07 AM
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I think your a bit confused.
Single/duel hose is a portable unit, and these are not propane powered. These need to vent outdoors as the air coming off the condenser is very hot. You ask if f they can be vented via ductwork, but say you only have one vent. What is that vent for? You will likely need to vent outdoors.
Fuel burning (and steam) air conditioners do exist, and are common. However this technology only exists in RV refrigerators and very large industrial chillers in the hundreds or even thousands of tons of capacity. This is called absorption. This kind of unit doesn’t exist for residential or portable use.
There was a fuel burning unit available in the 1980s but it was a disaster that was recalled.
The only other fuel burning unit I’m aware of is a VRF unit made by Yanmar/Daikin.
 
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Old 04-18-21, 04:54 PM
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There was a fuel burning unit available in the 1980s but it was a disaster that was recalled.
What was the name? never heard of those or even seen one before however using fuel that makes heat to cool a space seems counter productive to me.

VRF = Variable Refrigerant Flow correct?
I bet a 30 ton unit would make my 330SQFT apartment like a freezer (if it can even fit LoL)
 
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Old 04-18-21, 05:08 PM
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I've never heard of an actual home A/C unit that used propane but like mentioned there are RV type fridges that use propane. They run on heated ammonia. There were home fridges that also ran on propane and natural gas. They were made by Servel. They are still around and as long as the ammonia solution doesn't leak out they'll run forever.

Servel fridges
 
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Old 04-18-21, 05:14 PM
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It was the York Triathlon. And it used an internal combustion engine that burned natural gas. Pretty sure York bought all of them back due to major issues and problems.
Yanmars unit uses the same principle.
Yes, VRF means variable refrigerant flow.
30 tons would mean your unit would short cycle itself to death. And never dehumidify.
 
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Old 04-18-21, 05:55 PM
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30 tons would mean your unit would short cycle itself to death. And never dehumidify
I know I was joking I like the longer run times as it dehumidifies more I think my 10K window rattler is a tad oversized for a 330 SQFT place but never used it in really hot temps yet! But it does have a small kitchen area in the living room (one wall has the sink range refrigerator) so I guess it can keep up better if I cook on a hot day I usually cook early in the morning or at night and I make enough for the whole day.

I also bet a 30 ton unit is 3-phase which I don't have in the place.
 
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Old 04-18-21, 07:28 PM
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DICTIONARY - Redundant - see "Redundant"
What Is a Propane Air Conditioner? | DoItYourself.com
 
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Old 04-19-21, 03:00 AM
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Thanks Hal. That answers some of these questions. However no models are given there (What Is a Propane Air Conditioner? | DoItYourself.com). It explains the principle but offers no products. I am cost shopping and that's my dilemma.
Big picture - you could say that I'm a "prepper" and want to purchase something for a time when the electric grid is out here in San Antonio Texas. Therefore, I'm making one of my rooms "independent capable" and even hoped to vent the hose(s) into my central A/C ductwork (which I figure is just as good as a window for expelling fumes). Maybe not?

It's not out-of-the-question to use a window unit - but there won't be any electricity. Do you suspect that I'd need a separate generator that uses propane? Or an A/C that uses battery power?
 
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Old 04-19-21, 04:00 PM
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Look to getting a generator. Running on propane is fine.
An A/C will not cost effectively run on any type of batteries.
 
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Old 04-19-21, 04:14 PM
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Propane generator with a big tank should last "a while" if the grid is out. And propane generators run much cleaner than gasoline, so you don't have to service them as often. With a HUGE initial investment, you could run on solar power, but the required batteries will have to be replaced periodically. So neither is a permanent solution - but if the grid is out forever - well, people lived in Texas before electricity, somehow.
 
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Old 04-19-21, 04:51 PM
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You cannot expel any fumes via ductwork. As said fumes will not be vented outdoors.
In 19 years of HVAC I’ve yet to see any type of fossil fuel powered residential air conditioner.
As said above you’d be better off with a generator and window/portable unit. Which I think is where your single/duel hose question came from in post #1.
 
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