New HVAC - Conventional vs Heat Pump


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Old 06-15-24, 08:52 PM
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New HVAC - Conventional vs Heat Pump

These are my numbers written at Air Handler unit inside. Based on these I assume I have 2 Ton AC unit and 24000 BTU electric furnace. Is power rating for AC and electric furnace are same (24K BTU) based on these serial numbers?

Serial # L911724579
Manufacturer # NBCMo24xkb2
Blower Model # BCMo24xkb2

I live in Tennessee and Technology has changed a lot. What kind of energy efficiency ratings I need to look both for AC and Electric furnace. I am familiar with SEER for AC only and AFUE for furnace. Is there some thing else. What is HSPF? Is it similar to AFUE? What are most economical ratings one can get these days. I know most HVAC people will tell you higher it is better it is. But what is kind of sweet spot between rating number and cost?


I have read Heat Pump technology has changed a lot. New ones goes lit bit more deeper in ground. They are like in between older one or Geo Thermal. Not sure if these newer are still Heat Pump or goes by different name or tech. specification.


If I had older unit with much lower SEERs and 2 Ton capacity, what should be capacity of newer one? same 2 tons or a bit larger?

If I end up getting Heat pump, what are my options for electric furnace? I have read one can have typical electric furnace or electric resistance booster in the heat pump's air handling unit.

Brands, any suggestions? I have read good things about RHEEM and Goodman. Carrier I have read tend to expensive but not sure what do one get for paying lot more?
 
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Old 06-16-24, 04:48 PM
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The 024 denotes 24k btu or two tons.
Those "model" numbers don't match anything I've seen or recognize.

For Tennessee.... a heat pump would be a good idea especially if electric is your only energy source.
You could go with a two ton heat pump and 6-10kw of backup electric heat strips based on need.

This is an air to air heat pump.
Geothermal is extremely expensive and ultra high efficiency.
Geo requires installing underground water reserves/piping for cooling the condenser.

Many good companies to choose from. I don't make equipment recommendations.
However I did install a 3 ton split A/C with gas furnace from Goodman for my home.

I recommend getting several estimates. Allow them to pick the brand.
The installation is more important than the brand of equipment.
 
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Old 06-18-24, 12:30 PM
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Thanks for your reply and suggestion.

Heat Pump Technology

There is newer heat pumps systems and they call them Energy Efficient Heat Pumps? What is difference between these and older Heat Pump systems? I read they have to drill a bit more in ground than older systems. Any advantage of getting those vs standard Heat Pump. (I was using as an example as they are mentioned something in between standard Heat Pump and Geothermal, not sure if this is correct).

https://hvacdirect.com/heat-pump-systems.html


System Capacity:

My neighbor downstairs (exact same size but ceilings are 8 ft). I am upstairs and 9 ft ceilings. They just replaced their unit to 2 Tons Trane , 14 SEERs Heat Pump . I made few phone calls and I got mixed messages about how much capacity do I need? 2 ton or 2.5 tons. Not sure what will be more objective criteria.
 
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Old 06-18-24, 01:19 PM
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Energy Efficient Heat Pump is just a general term like anything else being energy efficient. It doesn't mean much.

What you describe is a geothermal system like PJ mentioned. They are considerably more expensive than a standard air to air system.

14 seer is the old minimum efficiency. At the beginning of 2023 they changed the rating system so make sure when looking at numbers to know if they are the old seer system or the new Seer2 rating system. When comparing consider the added expense of a higher efficiency system against it's expected payback period for your location. There are online calculators to help with the decision.
 
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Old 06-18-24, 01:58 PM
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There are tax credits of 30% or $2000 for Energy efficient HVAC.
https://www.energystar.gov/about/fed...rce-heat-pumps


I am looking at cost of different HVAC systems and there is not much cost difference between between HVAC units with Energy Star label and without. I am assuming in most case newer HVAC will cost me upwards of $6000 (parts and labor). Technically there are savings for paying higher SEER2 16 ratings unit.
 
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Old 06-18-24, 02:18 PM
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This tax credit is effective for products purchased and installed between January 1, 2023, and December 31, 2032.
That's a ten year window that I wouldn't count on.
And it's "up to" a certain amount.

Your company will do a heat load calculation to size the correct unit.
It's not something we can guess at.
 
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Old 06-18-24, 05:58 PM
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Is Heat Pump same as condensor?

Most of HVAC units have heat pumps outside and have fans on the top. Look like these

https://www.trane.com/residential/en...at-pumps/xr15/

Some one units I am seeing are vertical where fan is one the side. Something like that

https://hvacdirect.com/ventilation-p...id-135026.html


What is the difference?
 
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Old 06-18-24, 09:08 PM
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yes for the most part it works as a condenser for cooling and reverses flow for the heating cycle.
 
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Old 06-19-24, 08:50 AM
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Thanks

I was thinking if circular one where fan is on the top may have advantage as it has more area (circular) where heat can exchange vs vertical one (rectangle shape) purely based on size of area.

 
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Old 06-19-24, 10:36 AM
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maybe however for heating purposes the more enclosed one could do a little better not really sure, I have seen these installed on the roofs of larger buildings in cold climates inside there own little building that was climate controlled they was heating the heat pump to keep the efficiency up when they temps dropped to low.
 
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Old 06-19-24, 01:15 PM
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There are two parts to any system....... the inside air handler/furnace and the outside condenser.

You can't tell if the system is a standard split A/C or a heat pump by looking at it.
The condensers are designed to dissipate as much heat as possible in the summer and to extract heat from the outside air in the case of a heat pump.
 
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Old 06-19-24, 03:04 PM
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If you have no natural gas available, a heat pump is a good alternative. I live in Tennessee, and my heat pump system works great for this latitude. It’s backed up with a 15 kw elec heat section for those days (nights) below 20 deg. My whole heating bill for this past winter was $465.00. 2300 sq ft.
 
 

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