How's your Flex Fuel vehicle doing?

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  #1  
Old 07-09-07, 06:58 PM
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How's your Flex Fuel vehicle doing?

Hey all

I'm curious to know what everyone is getting for a mileage drop with their FF vehicles?

I have an 04 Dodge Stratus v6 that gets 15-19 MPG in E85, versus 25-30 on straight unleaded. I figure its a loss of 35-37 percent, if my math is right. It takes a 40 cent difference between e85/unleaded to break even. Normally its only around a 20 cent different so its not really worth it to burn it. Again if my math is right. .
 
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  #2  
Old 07-11-07, 02:45 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
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I have a 2006 GMC Pickup - E-85 Ready. With regular gas it gets 15.1 mpg. With E-85 it gets 14.3 mpg. My E-85 is around $1.00 less per gallon then regular. My brothers 2006 Chevy Pickup gets 15.6 mpg on regular and 13.9 on E-85. No problems here. Just as a note, I was recently talking to the service manager at our Chevy garage. He told me that if your getting poor mileage with E-85, you needed to have your carburator re adjusted.
 
  #3  
Old 07-11-07, 03:24 PM
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Carburator???

aren't those those things they used to use before everybody went to fuel injection?

There are adjustments to the control system that can affect mileage but from what I have seen, Jack got one of the (few) really good ones.


nova-gh, in my area, one of the local tv stations did a run(several actually) from the Ohio border to the Illinois border on the 80/90 (toll road). They came to a similar conclusion as you have.

Not trying to get into an arguement with jack, but I believe his results are not typical.

This is a quote from:http://www.gm.com/company/onlygm/energy/flexfuel.html



Also, vehicles running on E85 may have a cruising range that is about 25% shorter than the same vehicle operating on regular gasoline.

here is a link to a site that allows folks to post their prices. The greatest difference I saw was about 75 cents and some were nearly the same price between the two fuels.

http://www.cleanairchoice.org/outdoor/PriceForum.asp

if you check here:http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/calculatorCompareSideBySide.jsp?column=1&id=22624

you can find that the new updated government mileage ratings for a 2006 gmc 1500 w/5.3 liter eng. are (combined mileage)

gasoline: 16 mpg
E85: 12 mpg

that is a 25% drop in fuel mileage.
 
  #4  
Old 07-11-07, 05:30 PM
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hey jack, what state do you live in that your e85 is so much cheaper? I'm in Iowa and its like every city has an ethonal refinery now. You'd think we'd have the cheapest stuff around. Ours here is currently $2.49. Thats great your trucks get some decent mileage on the stuff.
 
  #5  
Old 07-11-07, 05:55 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
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South Dakota. I paid 2.15 yesterday. Last Friday I paid 2.27. Your price is higher probably because the Ethonal Plants are still on last years contracts with the farmers and they are also short of corn because last year was a bad corn year and production was down. This will probably change in October.
 
  #6  
Old 07-17-07, 06:58 AM
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This seems very wasteful to me.

A. Corn-based ethanol production can contribute to increased monocropping, which isn't good for long-term soil tilth. Until ethanol-from-lignocellulose gains some ground, this could be a problem.

B. A 30-45% shortcoming in energy output versus petroleum-based fuel is unacceptable...especially when one considers the cost of the refineries, trucking, etc. Sure, the process creates a few jobs, but at what cost?

C. It is rarely a good thing to focus too sharply on one solution to a problem. Iowa and Nebraska in particular are huge producers of corn, so they see an obvious ROI. But long-term, and in the not-so-distant future, this may end up being counterproductive.

However, I applaud the use of alternative fuels. It just seems this particular method has too many wasteful aspects to be a truly long-term solution.
 
  #7  
Old 07-19-07, 07:36 PM
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Lightbulb Something I noticed

I have an 04 trailblazer. it is not FF but what I have done and notice a considerable diffrence in highway mileage is mix the 2 fuels about a 5 to 15% (not sure I just thro in a 2gallon can or 3$ worth what ever is cheaper) E85 and then filler up. I get about 100 or so more mile out of the tank.
I picked this trick up on a trip from GA to NJ and noticed that my tank Range gage went up to like 450Mi when I stoped for gas in WV and I never saw that before. When I got to NJ and filled up back to my 310-320 range again. Noticed the same thing on the way back and on my next trip I checked and sure enough in WV they use a 10% mix at some stations.
The way i mix is not scientific by any means but that extra hundread going thru some places is a god send when the price in one state is 2.75 and the next state it is 2.95
 
  #8  
Old 08-24-07, 05:28 PM
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cant get the stuff

Got a 2000 ford Taurus flex fuel car but I will be darned if I can find any e-85 within 50 miles from my house. I live in North Texas and untill they build more stations I am going to keep using the high cost gasoline.
I say why build a car if you dont have the infastructure to support it?
 
  #9  
Old 09-15-07, 11:13 AM
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my experience... too expensive.

I have a 2000 Dodge Grand Caravan that is a FFV.

I run about 16 mpg city on regular unleaded and about 12 mpg city on E-85.

I figure for me to break even on the economic side, the price of E-85 has to be AT LEAST 20% cheaper than the price of regular.

I live in Northern MN and there are about 4 stations in my local area that sell E-85. They just can't seem to meet that 20% mark on the prices though. They all seem to hover around 13-15%.

If I can find it cheap enough, I always buy it.

As far as performance goes, the car seems to run noticeably smoother with E-85, and I like that it is a bit more environmentally friendly as it burns.

I have heard that if you live in a northern climate, like I do, that the starting is a little harder in cold weather. So I typically don't buy it in the winter.

Overall I prefer to use E-85, it's just too bad I can't afford it...
 
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