enclosing screened porch on deck

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  #1  
Old 09-06-04, 07:20 PM
jaws1975
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Question enclosing screened porch on deck

I have a 15 x 15 screened porch that is basically in the center of a long deck. There is an open deck on either side of the screened in area. If I want to enclose the screened in area for use all year what are my limitations? Do I need to change the foundation for the new living area? Are the normal deck footings support enough? Please help point me in the right direction. Thank you.

John
 
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Old 09-06-04, 08:22 PM
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jaws1975,

Normally decks, if built to code can handle 40 psf which is a requirement of home construction. The issue is what do you have now and how is it set up. Best advice is to get someone out to look at. As usually doing this alteration will require blueprints for application for a building permit.

If you have sufficient support, you need to think about other issues like insulation, heat, etc. All this will play a part in what you need to do.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 09-08-04, 06:19 PM
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jaws1975,

It is all going to depend on how you go about enclosing that area, and whether it will be additional living area (conditioned space), or just an enclosed patio room.

If you want to enclose it, add heating and cooling, and make it an addition to your house, then you are going to have to build it just like an addition to the house -- full foundation, meet energy calcs. as far as insulation, windows, etc., and whatever else is involved. (Where I live, they would add $2.50 per sq. ft. to the cost of the permit for 'school fees' since it is over 200 sq. ft.)

However, if you simply enclose it as a 'patio room' (no heating or cooling) and it's not blocking egress from any bedroom windows, then you would only have to build it to the specs required by the engineering for the patio room. You may have to beef up the substructure of the deck to support the walls of the patio room, but that would be far cheaper than doing a full-blown addition.

Check with YOUR local bldg. dept. and see what is required under each scenario. It will cost you NOTHING to ask, but it will cost plenty if you go about it the wrong way!!
 
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Old 09-13-04, 02:22 PM
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Similar situation, already built

We just bought our house that has something like what you described. When we bought, we were told the "addition" was permitted by the city. We got a copy of the permit and thought everything was okay. We then had a city inspector come out for the A/C we had installed. She said our permit must have been for the enclosed patio, but when the previous owners knocked out the doors and windows to make the patio become part of the house, she said they would have never gotten a permit. One day in the distant future we will probably have to get an architect to put this right. Our "addtion" has aluminum roof and walls.
 
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Old 09-13-04, 06:14 PM
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Tyger52,

That's EXACTLY what I mean. Your "addition" was done as a patio room. Given the aluminum walls and roof, it will meet every code requirement for a patio room, as long as it's not blocking bedroom egress and has no heating and cooling involved.

HOWEVER, as soon as the previous owners knocked out doors and windows, it became an addition to the living space of the house. An aluminum patio room simply WILL NOT meet the energy calculations to be used as living space, and Orange County (and none of the 57 others, plus all of the City jurisdictions in CA) simply will not let it fly as such.

I smell a lawsuit!!!
 
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Old 09-14-04, 09:32 AM
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Is it really worth a lawsuit?

Originally Posted by lefty
Tyger52,

That's EXACTLY what I mean. Your "addition" was done as a patio room. Given the aluminum walls and roof, it will meet every code requirement for a patio room, as long as it's not blocking bedroom egress and has no heating and cooling involved.

HOWEVER, as soon as the previous owners knocked out doors and windows, it became an addition to the living space of the house. An aluminum patio room simply WILL NOT meet the energy calculations to be used as living space, and Orange County (and none of the 57 others, plus all of the City jurisdictions in CA) simply will not let it fly as such.

I smell a lawsuit!!!
Ok, I have thought more about your answer and now that our housing market is falling, I have to ask: how do make the "addition" to code? (I know, big question, but anything is helpful right now in light of hiring an attorney.)
 
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Old 09-14-04, 09:45 AM
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Really only 2 options.

Least expnsive would be to put the walls, doors, windows etc. back like they were (or similar to it), remove any heating or cooling that may be going to the room, and convert it back to a patio room.

Other option would be to basically tear the room down and build a habitable space addition that meets all of the code requirements for such an addition -- proper foundation, insulation, ventilation, trussed roof, etc. etc.
 
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Old 09-14-04, 02:09 PM
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How long do we have?

Let's assume that if wife and I pursue the lawsuit, we will be forced to go the cheapest route. We like the way it is, except that the roof has leaked on the carpet in there. Question is, outside of selling, how long can we keep it this way? How soon should we start a lawsuit?
 
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Old 09-14-04, 10:28 PM
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I'm a contractor, NOT an attorney. But don't assume that you will be forced to settle for 'the cheapest fix possible'. After all, you bought the house with this room being represented as an ADDITION, not a patio room, and I would argue (IF I were an attorney!!) that the purchase price you paid was based on this being an ADDITION!

If you decide to pursue this with a lawsuit, consult an attorney in the very near future -- within a month or so would be my suggestion. It's not going to be a pretty case. You'll be after the seller for fraud, the realtor for failing to disclose the facts about the room, the seller for failing to disclose the leaky roof, ...
 
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Old 09-19-04, 03:10 PM
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Enclosing porch on deck

Have your local Building Inspector come take a look at your deck and porch. He should be able to advise you if what you plan to do will meet Codes and advise you of any required Permits.
 
 

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