Floor joist in our way - how can we work around it?


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Old 12-11-04, 11:10 AM
cbrodsky
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Floor joist in our way - how can we work around it?

We have a triangular chase on our second floor that is just big enough to accommodate a wood stove chimney running up from the first floor to the roof. However, it wasn't originally planned for that purpose. My concern is that we almost certainly have a floor joist for the second floor running under this chase, which would block our ability to route a pipe. We need a minimum free 12" width to the adjacent joists for the chimney pipe, meaning unless these joists just happen to line up to each side of the chase, they will interfere.

The second floor has 2x10 floor joists (S.P.F.) 16" O.C. spanning 13'10". Fairly new construction. The place we would want to go through the joist is about 2 feet from the bearing end of the joist.

What are our options from a remodeling perspective to work around this? Unfortunately, we don't have much latitude to move the woodstove chimney since the chase clearance is tight. If we had to remove the last two feet of one joist, is it possible to redistribute the load to the adjacent two joists using a steel beam or other end support on the free end of a cut joist to transfer the load to the other joists? Particularly if we reinforced the adjacent joist ends with steel plate or other options? Or is the only option to install new full span joists as needed to maintain a minimum of 16" O.C. if we remove the current joist? The room above is a bedroom - no abnormal loads.

Thanks for any advice - let me know if more details would help and I can try to describe the situation a little better!
 
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Old 12-12-04, 07:11 AM
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Hello & welcome to the forums. I'm gonna move thisd one up to the Architecture & Codes forum, I think Doug could give you the best informed response.
 
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Old 12-12-04, 01:33 PM
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cbrodsky,

Since awesomedell has been so kind to send this my way, I took the time to prepare something of a visual for you. Hopefully I have done this per my assumptions of your write up.

As you are aware, the methods used to provide the access through your existing second floor will be an endeavor that you may or may not be able to do yourself. This is considered a structural change so a building permit would be required, consult with your building officials first before proceeding.

The drawings have notes that explain what needs to be done regarding the 2x10's but there will be some drywall patching for sure.

Take a look at this and if you need more questions, ask away!

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/Do%20It%20Yourself (Click the Box Header gallery)

Please excuse the size of your home, this is a quick example that I hope will help. (lol)

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 12-12-04, 05:56 PM
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cbrodsky,

An option, if viable, is for you to build an outside chase verus the work you would have to do with the prior posting/pictures.

Is this an option or not considered due to other reasons?
 
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Old 12-12-04, 08:09 PM
cbrodsky
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Wow, pretty neat drawing! The only difference from that to our situation is the opportune location is actually on an inside wall, and is not at a corner. So I would guess we would have to do something similar to what you propose, but reinforce a joist to each side of the one that would be cut. What you show here is similar to what I was afraid would be required - full length reinforcement of the adjacent joists.

After some thought, I think we may have a couple other options if we sacrifice a built in alcove off our stairwell- it basically cuts into the triangular chase area where we are looking to put the pipe. And by filling it in and enlarging the chase area, we may give ourselves enough positioning latitude to avoid cutting a joist. (and then having to patch up the ceiling along two joist reinforcements!)

The other option I thought about was trying to build a header to support the cut end and redistribute it to the first floor much like door/window header. This would be assuming we have the wood stove set in a slightly recessed hearth area with adjacent built-ins to the side, which we're considering doing anyway. Then the header and posts down the side would more or less frame the front of that area. At least in that scenario, any reinforcement needed could be provided via basement access without tearing up our ceiling.

Regardless, we're going to have the wood stove dealer handle the chimney install and any structural work - it's more a question of making sure they do it properly, and getting an idea of how much has to be chopped up and what I'd be in for in terms of patch up work when they're done, because that part I want to do myself to keep the cost down.

Oh, regarding the outside wall suggestion - the whole back and rear sides of our house are windows or kitchen, so we don't have any practical options for an exterior chase. But from what I read, interior chases can actually be prefereable for wood stoves to help prevent creosote deposition.

Thanks for the info!
 
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Old 12-16-04, 06:58 PM
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doug gave you the right advice on the framing.

Here's another thought - you have to be 12" from combustibles - but can you provide a barrier (such as metal or drywall) between the stovepipe and the combustibles? I've run stovepipes up drywall lined "chimneys" before.

Check with your local officials!!
 
 

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