Jacking floor beams

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  #1  
Old 12-24-04, 08:08 AM
satajet
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Unhappy Jacking floor beams

Hoping for some advice on jacking floor beams.I live in a 2 story semi that is roughly 14 years old.Since i moved in I've noticed the top and bottom gaps on the bathroom doors, both of the baths are built one above the other, are uneven or tapered,almost an inch difference. The gap on the bottom of the door,away from the outside of the house is much larger than the gap closest to the outer wall of the house.I'm assuming the main beam of the house needs to be raised.The supports for the beams are steel tubes with a threaded adjusting collar.I know this is a critical area and don't to screw up my home.Please help with some guidlines to jacking the main beams
 
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Old 12-24-04, 09:37 AM
J
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Only tip I can offer is do it slowly!!!! Depending on how bad the sag is, this could take days, or even weeks. I wouldn't raise the lollies more than a half turn or so per day. It will take time, but your walls will appreciate it(and you will too when you're not fixing all the cracks you'll make if you move the beam too fast). To figure out where to stop(when it's level), use a string between both ends close to the end supports(presumably...the basement walls).
 
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Old 12-24-04, 08:13 PM
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like jproffer said -- SLOWLY!

But first, use the string to figure out what sagged and how much, then determine WHY.

I'm guessing that you will also be needing new (and LARGER) footings to support the beam, assuming that is what sagged. Probably don't need to be a larger diameter, but certainly deeper. Install them first, half way between the existing ones, and once you have the beam back to level, use both the new and the old footings to support the beam.
 
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Old 12-25-04, 11:21 AM
satajet
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Thumbs up Thanx Gentlemen

Going slow is the way to go I see now.I'm hoping the footing are O.K. they are in concreate ,which I guess is a no brainer for you guys. My basement is finished,albeit done in a unprofessional manner,so is there another way of guaging or measuring any progress. note I've exposed the supports Also should the steel post or lollie have a block of wood between the beam and the lollie ,or should the lollie be directly attached to the beam. Oh yeah,what type of professional does footing work,concreate guys???
 
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Old 12-26-04, 05:11 AM
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satajet,

First, you are going to have to expose the beam or beams in order to determine what has sagged and how much.

Next, you are going to have proper footings in place BEFORE you start removing the sag from the beams(s). Spend a few hundred $ and call in a structural engineer who will tell you how large and where those footings need to be, as well as the size and type of posts you'll need to use.
 
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Old 12-26-04, 06:02 PM
satajet
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thanx lefty,merry christmas,opps I guess happy new year now.
 
  #7  
Old 12-28-04, 05:25 PM
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You Know what they say about 'assuming'!

You know what they say about 'assume':

It often makes an XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

(NO NEED TO EXPLAIN)

Might just be the case in this instance.

You door sags may simply be the result of loose hinge screws and have nothing to do with any beam sag.

Better to get a professional to examine your home and make recommendations before you do anything and waste your money and time in the process.

NOTE: Members should demonstrate progressive ideals by avoiding vocabulary considered offensive, discriminatory or judgmental. Do It Yourself will not tolerate subordination of any individual, group or culture. Disruption of the flow of discussion or posting off-topic comments, duplication of posts and/or identical posts are prohibited.

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Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 12-28-04 at 08:32 PM. Reason: Inappropriate vocabulary
  #8  
Old 12-28-04, 07:18 PM
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Thats why if he can access it, he can test it with a string, and not spend money on footing guys OR a professional to examine, so he doesn't have to assume any more....he will KNOW. If the beam is sagging, it needs to be corrected regardless if that's why his door is sticking or not. If it's not then great, THEN look elsewhere, and yes if necessary, even call in a pro to examine other possible causes.
 
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Old 12-28-04, 07:49 PM
satajet
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expossed the support

I've exposed the steel support or lollie and between the beam(wooden 2by 12's)there is a piece of wood roughly4 by 4 by 2 thick in between the lollie and the beam which appear to be crushed slightly.Should'nt the steel lollie be contacting the beam directly, or is this common practice.The footing around the lollie's seam very sound.
 
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Old 12-28-04, 08:21 PM
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The 4x4x2 piece you describe was just intended to be sacrificial in nature IMO. You can put the lollies agaisnt the beam but in another 20 years you may have the same problem as your 4x4x2 board, but without the option to replace it. Find a piece of good, solid wood to replace the crushed wood with and level away (if the beam is indeed sagging)
 
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Old 12-28-04, 08:42 PM
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Seek a Professional

satajet,

I will insert my comments and close this thread. Due to the issues that you describe, it is best that you seek a professional as homebild and lefty suggested.

I do not feel that this thread is being dealt with in a professional manner when it concerns structural issues that could cost you dearly if mistakes are made. This is not a DIY'er endeavor and should be looked at by a professional before proceding with any band-aid approach. Comments to suggest anything else are not in your best interest. This is one project that needs the attention by someone who knows what to look for.

Good Luck!
 
 

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