Do 9X9 tiles on kitchen floor have asbestos in them?

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  #1  
Old 01-13-05, 09:54 AM
kitabi
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Do 9X9 tiles on kitchen floor have asbestos in them?

I just purchased a house which was an estate sale, Not much disclosure was made because the owners had died. I want to redo kitchen which has 9X9 tiles. The person helping me thinks that all 9x9 TILES contain asbestos and must not be removed. Do you know if there is any problem with covering it with other tiles in case his hunch is true? Can that effect sale of the house when I want to sell it?
Please help.
 
  #2  
Old 01-17-05, 12:25 AM
T
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The only way to know for sure if tiles or adhesive contain asbestos is to have an asbestos test done. Some vinyl & linoleum floor coverings and adhesives prior to 1983 contained asbestos. As long as asbestos is encapsulated it should create no problems. The requirement for sellers to provide disclosure only applies to conditions that are known. If you do not know if tiles contain asbestos, then you do not know.

Asbestos-containing materials are only hazardous when they are "friable," that is, if they can be crushed with normal hand pressure and thereby release fibers into the air. With vinyl floor tiles, asbestos fibers are embedded in a solid material that prevents release under normal use. The EPA, in fact, has determined that such materials are not hazardous if left as-is. If you are planning to remove the tiles for any reason, they should be tested for asbestos content and removed by a licensed asbestos abatement contractor if the test results are positive. Otherwise, there is no need for concern regarding adverse health effects.
 
  #3  
Old 01-23-05, 12:09 PM
G
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It is pretty much 100% that those tiles contain asbestos.

Like 12-pole said, those tiles as they are present no health problems (in fact asbestos tiles are still manufactured today).
 
  #4  
Old 01-26-05, 03:30 PM
S
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While this simple statement, [QUOTE] Asbestos-containing materials are only hazardous when they are "friable," that is, if they can be crushed with normal hand pressure and thereby release fibers into the air. [QUOTE], is the basis for caution and define the potential hazard, it is well to note that there are two components. They are the VAT and the CUTBACK adhesive.

Both VAT and "TRUE" CUTBACK ADHESIVES contain asbestos as a bonding agent. Its not just the "breaking" or "crushing", it is also the scraping of the surface of the adhesive.

Make no mistake, I am not advocating this practice.

It has been my experience that VAT just pops loose and only in heavy traffic areas have I had to use a torch to loosen them. The removal of the adhesive then becomes the dynamic where the exposure is most prevalent. In the past, the alternatives were a torch and scraper, sanding or grinding, or use of a chemical such as paint/lacquer thinner and gas.

If there is a loose tile that is easily lifted, intact, there is a simple test to determine if the adhesive is a true cutback; Take a small amount of really hot water and pour a bit on the adhesive, if it bubbles, IT IS NOT, a true cutback adhesive and has been amended from that which contains asbestos.

In current practice, the product is over-laid with any number of available troweled on cementacious sealers, tempered masonite, mahogany plywoods, and/or those specifically manufactured for this process.

Another interesting tidbit, is that there is no uniformity in the applications of a remediation policy. It ranges from "any" to "below an established square footage", is exempt.

If your are planning to install new floor covering, and have a dishwasher, make sure you can remove it without haveing to remove the cabinets.
 
 

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