support ceiling joists from above?

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-10-05, 09:32 AM
bobbythehat
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question support ceiling joists from above?

I wish to remove approximately 11' of a supporting wall in order to join two rooms. I have been told that it is possible to support the ceiling joists from above so as to avoid a below-ceiling beam. The wall will be removed starting at the exterior wall. Any idea how this should be done?
 
  #2  
Old 03-10-05, 09:59 AM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bobbythehat,

Best method is to install a flush beam or header. You would use joist hangers but the span is critical to the overall size of the beam, how much room you have to install one i.e. roof pitch, if there is a second floor above, overall load,etc.. You need a professional to look at it and see what is feasible and discuss with them what needs to be done.

I can't suggest anything as I can't see what you have or how the current structure was made. Making a suggestion here would not be in your best interest.

Hope this helps!
 
  #3  
Old 03-10-05, 12:39 PM
bobbythehat
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
There is no second story, and I have approximately 5 ft. clearance in the attic. Does that help?
 
  #4  
Old 03-10-05, 02:46 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bobbythehat,

This is one example of flush beam. Note the metal joist hangers that are holding up the ceiling/rafters. THe other picture show that we now have a flat ceiling and the kitchen now has a wide open space once we removed the wall.

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/279304/1/11080045

Again, not knowing what you have and what the total span would be, load requirement, a professional should be called in to assess the site.

Hope this helps!
 
  #5  
Old 03-14-05, 07:41 AM
bobbythehat
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hi Doug

It has been sugessted that it would be possible to run a beam over the ceiling joists and using metal straps support the joists that way. The beam, of course, would be supported on either end with posts. This would be done before removing the supporting wall. Does this make any sense to you?
 

Last edited by bobbythehat; 03-14-05 at 07:55 AM.
  #6  
Old 03-14-05, 07:57 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 455
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As long as you can get it in. You might have to cut a hole in the exterior wall to slide the beam in thru, but it is a solution.
 
  #7  
Old 03-14-05, 08:09 AM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bobbythehat,

The method for doing what I provided the link for is to build a temporary support wall within 3 feet of where the beam is to be located - you need to allow room to work while this is being installed and hangers applied. The temp wall should be done to be firmly in place and if required ensure tht the point loads are supported from below to hold up the above structures until the beam installation is complete.

I have never had to cut a hole to slide such a beam in as there is enough room to get them in. There is however a "first time for everything".

Hope this helps!
 
  #8  
Old 03-14-05, 10:10 AM
bobbythehat
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks ,Guys, for your responses. Now here's one: Anybody ever done this, or know someone who has?
 
  #9  
Old 03-14-05, 01:07 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 455
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Doug Aleshire
bobbythehat,

The method for doing what I provided the link for is to build a temporary support wall within 3 feet of where the beam is to be located - you need to allow room to work while this is being installed and hangers applied. The temp wall should be done to be firmly in place and if required ensure tht the point loads are supported from below to hold up the above structures until the beam installation is complete.

I have never had to cut a hole to slide such a beam in as there is enough room to get them in. There is however a "first time for everything".

Hope this helps!
Sorry Doug, I was responding to the question about installing the beam AOVE the ceiling joists. As I said, it can be done but requires a way to get the beam in there. Your suggestion is perfectly fine but would require a little more demo plus the temp walls. Snaking a beam in above the joists can be done while the original wall is still in place, and the ceiling joists supported before the wall is removed.
 
  #10  
Old 03-14-05, 01:17 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Joe,

No problem. Thanks for the clarification on it. I have only done a couple like this and then using the tall hangers. Not knowing what is above there now could be a problem. As you suggest, sliding it in can be done. Doing this from below is easier especially if we are dealing with an attic/insulation/wiring/rafter framing, etc and in some cases low head room to even do the work. I only suggest the other due to avoiding many of these issues. They're really not that much harder or labor intensive to do it. Either way is good.

Thanks for the insight though.
 
  #11  
Old 03-14-05, 02:53 PM
bobbythehat
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
so Joe,
You've done this before?
Assume that I can get the beam up there.( I'd probably bring up individual 2x8's or2x10's and build the beam in the attic) Do you have any idea of something on the market, metal straps or some such, to suspend the joists with, or do I have to have them made? How much support would I have to add on each end:ie how big a beam? Remember, it is only an 11' open span. The floor joists rest on a support wall that rests on a concrete slab, as this house is a split ranch.Talk to me guys.
 
  #12  
Old 03-14-05, 03:03 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bobbythehat,

Both of us have. Take a look at this for hangers. A variety are offered depending on application.

http://www.strongtie.com/products/co.../THA-THAC.html

I would suggest using LVL's.

I think getting a professional in there to see what you have,what would be the best approach to this endeavor before you start doing anything.

Good Luck!
 
  #13  
Old 03-14-05, 04:14 PM
bobbythehat
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Those hangers look spiffy! I wasn't aware that you could get them that long. They look like they'd work just fine.
Taking more of your advice, I've contacted a contractor and he'll be by tomorrow. Talk about luck! Not as if he's got nothing better to do, especially knowing that I'm doing this with family and friends. Please don't hesitate to pass on any further thoughts on the subject.

Thanks much!
 
  #14  
Old 03-14-05, 04:51 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,679
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
bobbythehat,

You're very welcome!

If you look at my profile, you'll understand that I know what I'm talking about.

Good Luck tomorrow and keep us informed how you are doing!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: