Converting addition to master bedroom + second bathroom

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Old 04-18-05, 10:02 AM
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Converting addition to master bedroom + second bathroom

I have a bungalo in Michigan with a 14x17 addition, and I would like to convert it into a master bedroom and a second bathroom. My plan is to put up a wall 6 or 7 feet into the room, on one side I would have a 14x11 bedrrom, on the other I would have a toilet, sink and shower in a bathroom that is roughly 6x6, then the rest would lead to outside.

I have two questions. For one, I would like to put a whirlpool tub in the bedroom adjacent to the bathroom, is there any problem with this?

Second question is regarding running the plumbing through a crawl space... Right now, I have a basement that is heated, but a crawl space under the addition.. There is basewater heat plumbing running through the crawl space, but otherwise no plumbing. Are there any code requirements that I need to be aware of, particularly in terms of keeping the plumbing from freezing in the winter? Or are there things that should already be in place that I can see? Do I need to insulate? Or provide heating in the crawl space?
 
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Old 04-18-05, 01:40 PM
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WillK,

I would like to put a whirlpool tub in the bedroom adjacent to the bathroom, is there any problem with this?
Converting this addition as you describe is no problem as long as you are meeting code. No problem where you put the whirlpool but a seperate circuit for it with a GFI is required.

So first off, where is the permit to do so? Second, you should have some drawings done to submit to the City to do the renovations.

Bedroom must have an egress window
Bedroom electrical must have an arc ground fault interrupter installed
Bedroom must have a hard wire smoke detector as well as other bedrooms, hallway and one in the basement - all interconnected.
Bathroom must have an exhaust fan with GFI
Minimum ceiling height is 7'-6".

The crawl space should had been insulated - if not, add R-19 to the perimeter. With this in place, it would keep your crawl space to about 42-46 degrees during winter. Ensure that 6 mil poly is placed over the soils. Thus no freezing pipes. I would assume that you have access to this crawl space area and if it is through the basement, make a screened access door to allow heat from the home to assist in providing some natural flow heat to get into this space. Close your crawls space vents if open during the winter.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 04-18-05, 06:54 PM
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Small note- unless your local area has an ammendment, the smoke alarm doesn't have to be interconnected if you're not tearing up the drywall and you're allowed to put a standalone. (If you tear up the drywall enough that it's reasonable for you to hook into the other smoke alarms, it's still required though.)
 
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Old 04-18-05, 08:27 PM
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Bedroom conversion egress windows...

This project is part of my overall home improvement plan for this year. My wife is pregnant, so I planned 3 major projects before she's due (plus some other smaller projects), the one I described is the last of the 3 and right now I'm in the middle of the first which is a roofing project. At this point, I've estimated my budget and gotten a home loan to cover all of my planned projects, so I haven't pulled any permits for any of this yet. At this point I'm just starting to detail my rough plans.

I'm aware of most of the requirements you had listed.. I'm going to be facing a little bit of a challenge coming up with enough electrical circuits since I already have a pretty full panel.. I may need some creative solutions to avoid having to get into a major house-wide rewiring project, but that's another topic altogether.

The one thing you pointed out I had forgotten about was egress. This could be something I hadn't budgetted for. As it stands, there is a door on the addition that leads outside to the deck, but my plans would have put that outside the bedroom (I don't much care for the idea of the door to go to the backyard means people in my house have to go through the master bedroom...)

Aside from that door, I have 5 windows (4 are the same size, the fifth is a smaller window with 3 panes side by side, the middle one is fixed, none would be large enough for an adult to fit through)... I don't know what the size requirement of a window for egress is, but I can say even if these windows qualified, I wouldn't want to have these windows as my only escape route.

Until I just now looked it up, I didn't know the terminology.. The 4 matching windows are double casement windows, the window openning in the wall is 2' wide by 3' tall roughly, so each window openning is 1' wide and if I openned the window to try to get out, I wouldn't even have that entire width to squeeze through..

This is a pretty major consideration I missed too, being that there's 4 windows, I'd imagine it would be hard to get my wife to accept just changing 1 window from a style perspective, and 4 windows I didn't budget for goes way beyond the kind of cushion I have built in to my budget... I might have to petition the parents for a little help.
 
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Old 04-18-05, 08:30 PM
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P.S.

Originally Posted by Doug Aleshire
Hope this helps!
Yes, definitely, thanks for helping me catch this before it got to a point where I had to completely stop everything and had fewer options on reprioritizing the whole project.
 
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Old 04-18-05, 08:34 PM
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WillK,

Congrats to the Mrs.!

Take a look at this. Disregard the basement window well idea but the other info will help you.

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/245141

If you have questions about electrical, post a question in tht topic - John Nelson is real good!!

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 04-18-05, 08:35 PM
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WillK,

Sorry, You're Very Welcome!

Good Luck!
 
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Old 04-18-05, 09:06 PM
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Looks like changing windows is going to add $400-$500 if I got them myself at Lowes or Home Depot and did my own installation, then I'm guessing it goes up from there.. I can make up for it if I can find a way of cutting the tankless water heater out of the budget, my current water heater is 40 gallons, I was figuring with a second bathroom and especially with a whirlpool tub I'd want more capacity..

I think this is what they mean by ripple effect..
 
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Old 04-18-05, 09:09 PM
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WillK,

This might help,

WATER HEATER SIZING

At one time or another, we all have encountered the tragic experience of running out of hot water. This might had been while taking a bath or especially a shower. For those taking a shower, it is especially noticeable due to those that really like to take that long hot one.

So, to determine the right size water heater for your home, you need to figure out the peak demand that will be required from your water heater. The table below lists the typical amounts of water for various uses. Look at the activities that will occur simultaneously and choose a water heater that can handle the required load.

ACTIVITY GALLONS PER USE
Shower - 15 Minutes 14-16
(Shower head flow can go from 2.0 gpm to 3.0 gpm)
Bath - Adult 20-30
Bath-Whirlpool (48 gallon capacity) - Adult 25-32
Hand/Face Wash 1 - 4
Shave 1 - 2
Dishwashing (hand) 2 - 4
Dishwashing (automatic) 12-14
Food Preparation 3 - 5
Clothes Washing 10-32

The hot water supplied by a storage type water heater (typically the average home uses this type) will begin dropping in temperature before the total water in the heater is consumed due to the mixing of incoming cold water.

Example:

A family of four, the following activities may occur within 1 hour;

8:00 AM - Adult takes a shower and shaves - 18 gallons used.
8:15 AM - Adult takes a shower - 15 gallons used
8:30 AM - Two children wash face/hands - 3 gallons used
8:40 AM - Breakfast food preparation - 3 gallons used

Total hot water required for one hour: 39 Gallons

To insure full temperature hot water you need to choose a water heater that has a first hour rating of 40 gallons minimum or more. I suggest that a 50 gallon be selected for the above application due to variations of the use within the first one hour. Donít forget, that in time the recovery rate for these water heaters will decrease over time. In some cases, especially with those that have a larger family & may also have a whirlpool bath, it may be wise to invest in 2 water heaters. As you can see, hot water consumption can be very heavy just in the example used and we didnít even touch on the washing of clothes or dishwasher use.

Time to have 2 water heaters!
 
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Old 04-18-05, 09:26 PM
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Alright, I think I have some options I can mull over.. I think I can almost squeeze out the 4 windows plus a second water heater to cover the new plumbing for what I'd budgetted for the tankless water heater. That, or I'll have to wait a bit longer to get that new gas grill.
 
 

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