Load Bearing Wall???

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  #1  
Old 07-03-05, 08:19 AM
srepyuk
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Load Bearing Wall???

I want to remove a wall between our Family Room and Living Room. The opening would be approximately 10'. I am wondering if it is a load bearing wall? I had a home inspection done before purchasing it and the inspector said that it wasn't a load bearing wall. It has a hip roof. The family room, at the back of the house has a vaulted ceiling that comes down to the wall I want to remove in the center of the house. The Living Room is in the front of the house. The home inspector said the roof is a rafter system. After reviewing some of the other posts, I want to make sure of this. One of the posts from Doug Aleshire explains that usually vertical struts are placed directly over a load bearing wall. I do not see any vertical struts running the entire length of the center of the attic. The only thing on the ceiling joists through the center of the attic is the Air Conditioning ductwork. There are vertical struts, but they are offset, not running down the center.

Any help would be greatly appreciated
 
  #2  
Old 07-03-05, 11:52 AM
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Load Bearing Wall

Since this wall you want to remove is where your vaulted ceiling ends, I would have it checked by a building inspector or contractor. Do not rely on what someone else said, have it checked again. It could save you alot of heart ache and money. Houses are not all built the same, in this case having it checked is the safe way. Good Luck
 
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Old 07-03-05, 03:42 PM
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Jack the Contractor,

I talked to srepyuk and it appears that there is a concern that it is a bearing wall. As you pointed out, what one other person said may not be the way it is. Thus removal without replacement beam would be foolish.

The other is that it may have a pre-man. truss, a cathedral, as on the one side of the bearing wall is a flat ceiling and the other a vault.

Normally in this case it would also mean that the wall would be bearing. In your experience, isn't this the case even if it is a pre-manufactured truss?

I hope to have more answers by Tuesday or Wednesday on this issue. If needed, srepyuk should get a professional contractor in there once he closes on the new home to verify existng conditions.

You brought up good points that I had already relayed to srepyuk and he already has good ideas and understanding on what we may encounter with this issue.
 
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Old 07-04-05, 04:18 PM
L
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Jack, You're thinking like I am. If the ceiling on one side of the wall is flat and the one on the other side is vaulted, or cathedraled, it's almost certainly a bearing wall.

Doug, let me know if I'm wrong.

Srepyuk, Home inspectors that are used at the sale (or purchase) of a house and building inspectors are as different as night and day. IMHO, the question about whether the wall is bearing or not is beyond what home inspectors are all about. Ask a bldg. inspector.
 
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Old 07-04-05, 04:21 PM
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Lefty,

What you said is exactly what me and Jack have already eluded to as well.

I'll know more come Tuseday.

Happy 4th of July!
 
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Old 07-04-05, 07:15 PM
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Doug:

In my experience, it should be a bearing wall, and if it was not built as a bearing wall, it should have been.

We shall await further information from you.

Thanks, Jack
 
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Old 07-05-05, 08:53 PM
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Jack and Lefty,

All guesses are off and confirmation is solved! After talking with srepyuk, the following link will show what srepyuk has and my suggestions on how to provide the opening he wishes.

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/639580

Hope this helps everyone!
 
  #8  
Old 07-06-05, 02:22 PM
M
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slightly similar in topic...

I have a load bearing column and wish to remove it to create an open span of 15feet 9 inches end to end. Currently, I have this column at 13' and then another one we are leaving alone at the 15'9" point.

Turns out that, after opening up the ceiling in this 100 year old house, I have discovered some interesting things... Funny how some people live!

Looking up into the ceiling and seeing where the old meets the new, I have stood there in awe underneath 12 old floor joists meeting a mysterious place which, onthe new side, has ONE new 2x8 with 12 new joists held up with joist hangers.

Apparantly, they had added on a new section to the house and those joists are properly hung across the current span. BUT on the old side of the house, there is NOTHING holding up the current joists at all and NO beam running across from one end of the room to the column at 13'!!! Nothing. Nothing sistered to the new one, and so there's only the one holding up the new side! Oh sure, a few giant nails and bolts are there, but these are--get this--nailed and half bolted into the STUDS of the upstairs bedroom! Not into any beam that should be tied into it all.

It is still standing but if you look at the now exposed ends of these joists, they dip in the center about 1.75 inches where as the ones on the end are fine, of course. Nothing is cracked, nothing sags and nothing is rotted, but two wood experts have been in there and we cannot figure out why it hasn't caved in --yet.

Nonethless, in my efforts to expand this opening from 13 feet to 15'9", I am now going to be certain to add those joist hangers! They make ones that work for old wood (8x2' with TRUE unplanined 2 inch widths) and so those will be used on the 12 joists in that area.

I will be jacking up the series' of joists on both sides of where my beam will go, and I will be reinforcing all columns...

I will be basically inserting up into the space above, a large beam that will hold this area up and then removing my colum at 13' and all jacks when done. I will cut away the joists to meet up with it and go from there!

I was planning to use the following but I have a question about weight and this is holding up a second floor and a roof of a house so I figure it's better to go over what is required. i do not know the weight but can someone answer the general issue itself?:

1) I will be either creating a laminated beam out of 3 pieces of 16 foot hemlock, 8 inches in depth, 1.5 inch width each beam, bolted together with 1/2 inch carraige bolts after installing one beam at a time and using construction glue to laminate inbetween.

2) or I will be getting 7 1/4 deep 1.75 wide 16 foot LVL beams done the same way. I may need only 2 but may do 3.


any thoughts on what is best and if I need 3 of the LVLs or just 2?

I know it is not a fully complete question but I thought I should at least ask.

Thanks!
MM
 
  #9  
Old 07-08-05, 10:00 AM
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srepyuk,

even though this wall is bearing you have a couple of options to get your opening. You can either use a 4x12 header and frame it in like a door or window opening with a double trimmer/dbl king stud. make sure that these king studs are bearing either on a stemwall or on a pier footing.

option two is to use a flush beam on top of the plates. use 4x4 posts or dbl king studs at either end of the beam. over bearing same as above. You trim the tails of the rafters in the coffer and they hang on the side of the flush beam with simpson hangers.

Marathon Man,


If I understood the (ex) joists are face nailed into the studs of a wall. Then bolted. These studs are niow carrying the load into the wall frming. Perfectly fine the only item missing would be fireblocking and sheetrock blocking.

as far as the beam dbl or triple lvl why not just use the Mcmillan Truss Joist beam calculator built into their website or go to your local yard and have them calc. what size beam to use. You have so much going on you may even want to pay a local structural engineer and have an acurate calculation to include floors, ceilings, wall loads etc..


I hope this helps.

Brian Garrison
General Contractor/Professional Building Designer
 
  #10  
Old 07-08-05, 02:50 PM
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thank you!
I have found some specs and am going to visit the yard where I am able to buy the LVLs. Those bolts on above older joists were going not thru the joists into studs, rather, they were holding up one 2x6 on a 13foot span, its 12 joists on hangers, and THEN bolting into the 2x2 old studs only in 4 places. All old joists were hung on studs with nails and that's it. Nothing else. But the LVL should solve it all and allow for the more opened up span.

Will let you all know what the results are!
MM
 
 

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