Any dangers of moving a supporting pole

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Old 08-11-05, 05:33 PM
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Any dangers of moving a supporting pole

I had a general question, and a specific question about moving a supporting pole for an I-beam. I will get the appropriate structural engineering support, and have the permits pulled for it. But my first question is more of a fundamental question about moving a pole the main reason that we want to move pole about 4feet is because the pole is smack dab in the center our our transition area into our sitting room. There will probably be about 3 feet on one side, and 4 feet on the other side. This pole is in the middle of a 23 foot I-beam. There are 2 other supporting poles on the ends of the ibeam. Is moving a supporting pole a bad idea for an aesthic reason like we are considering? Are there a lot of down sides to moving a pole like this? (long term/short-term). Is there much expertise involved in moving a pole like this? Can any contractor who says they can move it, really do it? Obviously there will be inspections in there, so I guess I don't have to worry, but I wanted to ask the experts.

The last question, is what is the best way to get ahold of a structural engineer. I went on servicemagic, and I got a structural engineer that wants $800 for doing the calculations, and the drawing that I can submit to the county. Is this an okay price to pay. If it matters, we live in Northern VA.

Thanks.
-S
 
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Old 08-11-05, 05:58 PM
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S

First of all let me say that the fee is not out of line. If you had just asked me cold turkey how much, I would have said between $700 and $900. It is in line, and they will earn every penny of it. Now for moving the support pole.
I guess you can have it moved if you want to. It only takes money. One of the first things that pop into my head is the footing. Your floor will have to be dug up, and a new footing poured where you want the pole moved to. This is not an everyday easy job. This beam holds up your house. Now your second question. Can any contractor do this ? No they cannot. The steel beam will have to be blocked up and 20 or 40 ton hydraulic jacks will have to be placed to hold the beam while you pull the old pole out. You will probably need a new pole also. I would say this, just as a matter of conversation. Most contractors will not be able to do this, and those that cannot do it, will probably say they cannot do it. I would look for a contractor that deals in basements, or steel buildings. Probably the steel building contractor. You might contact Morton Buildings in your area and ask who they use. Just my thoughts. This is an expensive job. Good Luck
 
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Old 08-12-05, 01:17 PM
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Jack,
THanks for your feedback. I will have to make sure that I select a good contractor for the moving of the pole(by moving, I mean adding a new pole in the new location, and removing the old pole). One of the main things I wanted to determine is if moving these poles have many long-term problems, like foundation problems, or beam problems. It sounds like these are not that risky to perform, and should really not pose any long term risks.

Thanks again.
Sony
 
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Old 08-12-05, 06:44 PM
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Moving Pole

In your case there is probably not much to be concerned about since you are only moving it a few feet. If you were moving it 6 or 8 feet, it would be a whole different story.
 
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Old 09-20-05, 09:46 AM
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I wanted to ask a follow-up question to this thread. I have pulled the permits, and they dug 30"x30"x30" hole in the new spot. The old pole that we will eventually remove is 7'3" -7'6" long, with only 7' showing, so it is only going into the ground a max 6". That seems really short. The new pole is going into the ground 18", with 12" of footer. The old pole is only rated for 14,500 lbs, and the new one is rated for 17,000 lbs. The one thing that the structural engineer is stating that we should put some type of lateral brace to brace the pole against the joists. I really didn't want to do that, since that would require that I have a bulkhead, if I do that. None of the other 8 poles in the basement have any lateral bracing. Is that just overkill, or does his recommendation have merit? The other question I have is regarding removing the old pole. I know that I have to wait 25 days or so for the concrete to cure for the new pole. What I wasn't sure about is if the old pole is under tension. So what is the reocommended way of gettig rid of the old pole? Blow torch, just hacksaw it out, light saber? Should they be removing the old pole in it's entirety, or can they just open up the concrete a few inches underthe pole, and then cut it out? I'm sure in a perfect world they should remove the entire old pole, but if they can remove it safely in some other manner, than it really should not matter. Just to re-state, this old pole is the middle pole of an ibeam that has three poles, and is resting on the foundation on the very end of one side. I-beam length is 23', and the middle pole is moving 5.2 feet(acutally it is more centered now, than before)

Thanks.
Sony
 
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Old 09-20-05, 10:26 AM
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Hopefully

the engineer has calculated that the enlarged span can be handled by the existing beam.
 
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Old 09-20-05, 10:36 AM
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Any dangers of moving a supporting pole

I don't know where you got the 25 days wait for the concrete to cure. If you want a shorter time ask your engineer how soon you can put the existing load on the column. Applying loads before the "magical" curing period is done all the time.

Your existing load is not the same as the full design load with the house full of people, appliances, aquariums, water beds and 4 feet of snow on the roof with an 80 mile an hour wind blowing all at the same time.

Dick
 
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Old 09-20-05, 11:23 AM
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To Uniquename
To me there is not an enlarge span, but rather a redistribution of the existing span. So instead of the ples being at the 3, 18, and 23 foot mark of the I-beam, they will be at 3, 13, and 23 foot mark of the i-beam.
 
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Old 09-20-05, 11:27 AM
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I don't want to get into a holy war about second guessing the structural engineer. I am only wondering, because the engineer was talking about straps even before coming out for a site visit. I just wonder how much of it is "erring on the side of safeness." Or is there some well known fact within the structural engineering code, that any modications like this would need steel straps to provide lateral stability to the column?

Thanks for any help anyone can provide.

Sony
 
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Old 09-20-05, 11:32 AM
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To concretemasonry,
Yeah, I guess my question was less about the curing time of concrete, but rather what the process is for removing the old pole. I was just wondering what are the normal steps to adhree too. I have the structural engineer coming over this evening, and I like to be armed with information, so that I can understand better, and bring up valid points that may be discussed on this forum.

Thanks for your reply.
 
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Old 09-21-05, 08:57 AM
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Here's what I mean

So instead of the ples being at the 3, 18, and 23 foot mark of the I-beam, they will be at 3, 13, and 23 foot mark of the i-beam

The section that used to be from 18'-23' is now at 13'-23' so it used to be a 5' span now its a 10' span.
 
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Old 09-22-05, 07:33 AM
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yeah I guess you are right. I did have a question about these metal straps that the engineer is talking about. What he is saying is that he wants to have a metal strap that goes from the new pole to a joist. Since the supporting pole does not line up with any joist, he is talking about either having two straps go at an angle to 2 adjacent joists(maybe at 30 degree's). Are these metal straps a common thing when moving supporting poles? I get the feeling that the engineer does more commercial buildings, rather than residental. Maybe these type of straps are common on those applications.
Thanks for any info anyone can provide.

Sony
 
 

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