How About We Rebuild the Header?

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  #1  
Old 09-23-05, 11:43 AM
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Cool How About We Rebuild the Header?

See Moving Support Posts
 
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Old 09-24-05, 02:20 PM
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Star,

you have gone to the trouble of getting an engineers advice. It is to replace the existing header completely and rebuild with his reccomendations. You then come back to the forum to go around a local professionals advice. If it were me I would be asking the engineers opinion on your proposal not guys who have not been to the project and dealt with your codes.

In Florida it is the wind loads that govern your engineering. Your original concept of creating a flitch beam was improper and I am glad you have abandoned it. You need solid bearing under all splices. If you are looking for the "easy out" there is not one. If the 7' span is in the center and you are moving the center posts farther apart what you could do is cut the dbl 2x10 so that it splices over the new posts. Then insert a new dbl 2x10 header across the new midspan. Otherwise you will need to remove the entire header length and either install (1) 4x4 post at midspan per engineering or (2) per your own desire. You can always make a span smaller by adding posts you just cannot increase a span. I would use simpson pb44's at post to concrete connection. I would use pc46 post caps at the top to allow positive connections. I would also nail (2) 16d's at 16" along ther entire beam to connect the dbl 2xs to each other.

I hope this helps.

Brian Garrison
General Contractor/Professional Building Designer
 
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Old 09-24-05, 10:47 PM
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Brian - thanks for the feedback. Unfortunately, the 7' section is on one end - if it were in the center this would have been a simple fix. As to your other point, the main reason I asked about joining one lam beam to the 2x12s is that the engineer made noises like it might work, but wouldn't say go ahead and do it. I presume because he doesn't want any liability from telling me to do something that isn't per the computer specs. Sometimes there's another way to make something work, even if it isn't the "best" way to do it - perhaps not in this case. <shrug>

Thanks again to everyone who's weighed in on the issue. I'll be sure to stop back by and let everyone know how it turned out.
 
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Old 09-25-05, 06:40 AM
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Star,

As Brian indicated and I as well in this thread,
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=232833

I provided the same information. Difference is that the engineer suggested "two 1 3/4" x 9 1/2" x 27' lam beams nailed together to replace the 2x10s. Using those lams, he tells me I'd actually only need one 4x4 support in the center."

I suggested, due to current conditions, 3 posts, 2 - 2x10s with the posts directly under each spliced area. (overlapping) Lam beams are not cheap and using 2x10's would be more economical and considered more than adequate for what you have. For an engineer not to say go ahead and do it makes me question his experience when he makes such a recommendation.

Using or making a flitch beam is acceptable but it must be done correctly. Using the 2 lams would be better but there is cost involved. As Brian mentioned, this would reduce the amount of posts to 3 total.

But as Brian said, asking us the questions, we provided feedback - consistent with the Engineer and then consulting with an engineer after asking here seems to be an insult to us, IMHO. On the other hand, maybe the question should not had been asked here to begin with.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 09-25-05, 03:08 PM
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ut oh...

Holy mackerel! I at no time meant to insult anyone - least of all Doug who went above and beyond the call of duty to offer his advice in this situation.

I placed a call to the lumber yard engineer on the advice of some of the posters, which contradicted the advice of some of the other posters - then came back to cross check what the engineer told me with some real world pros. I'm a girl - we're concensus builders - I figure if five of you agree it'll work and two say it won't, I feel pretty safe moving ahead with the majority. I also presumed that each piece of additional information I could provide to the group would help in clarifying my issue, might spark another solution idea or potentially reveal a fatal flaw in my plan. Apparently, I just succeeded in ticking people off.

In any event, I apologize if my actions seemed to discount or disrespect anyone's input on this matter. I sincerely appreciate the time and effort each of you took in helping me find solutions to my problem. It was certainly never my intention to make anyone feel otherwise.
 
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Old 09-25-05, 03:13 PM
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Star,

No problem. We just seemed confused, not ticked off, at what steps you took but understand what your intentions are now. And either being a girl or boy, your reasons are quite valid.

Thanks for clarifying things. I (we) appreciate it. Thank you

We really are here to help, so don't be a stranger, ok?

Good Luck!
 
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Old 09-27-05, 12:02 PM
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Star,

you go girl. Building by consensus has only one problem. Ultimately no matter what the five say you have the liability. My only point was not that you came to us. But that you had sought out a local professional. Koodos for that. We cannot see the footing size and layout which you have not discussed. The engineer should have spec'd out something for you to do to the slab (cut it out and add some sort of footing to distribute the load). Unfortunately the easiest fix is not always right. You may have to temporarily brace the ceiling while you demo that beam. Pour new pier footings and then install new posts and header. Ultiamtely you will have satisfaction knowing it will last 50-100 years. We really do not take offense at too much. I was just asking why if oyu have a licensed professional whose stamp and liability are on the plans would you second guess him. If anyhting goes wrong you have him for the recourse. When I see lams spec'd loads are greater than we all figured.

good luck on your project.

Brian Garrison
 
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Old 10-03-05, 09:44 PM
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Thumbs up Mission Accomplished!

Utilizing Doug's advice and considering Brian's comments about the header lengths, we cut down the middle 10' section to 7' and installed a new 10' section at the end, installed new kings, jacks and center supports, etc. using a combination of the techniques suggested. It's solid as a rock and oddly enough, though it wasn't what I originally planned, I think it may actually be better! Go figure...

I just wanted to say thanks again to everyone who contributed their guidance, wisdom and grace in helping me realize this project. We couldn't have done it without you.

Star
 
  #9  
Old 10-04-05, 05:29 AM
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Star,

On behalf of all of us, you're very welcome!

I hope you enjoy the improvements for years to come!

We're always here to assist!

Thank You
 
 

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