Removing load bearing wall

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  #1  
Old 12-11-05, 10:57 AM
sjpiro
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Removing load bearing wall

I want to remove a load bearing wall that separates a dining room from a living room on the first floor of a two story home. The wall to be removed is a 17 1/2 ft. wall. I want a concealed header to replace the load bearing wall. I've got 9 1/4 in. floor joists that span 12 ft in each room. The roof is stick frame, not trusses (I think that makes a difference). Can I get a 9 1/4 in. wide laminated beam that will span the length I need or will I need on with a sandwiched steel plate between the two beams?
 
  #2  
Old 12-11-05, 02:52 PM
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Removing load bearing wall

Since this type of job fortunately requires an permit, you should get an engineer to design the appropriate support. It is a lot cheaper than just going out and buying the wrong support or method of support.

He will aslo be able to come up with the right connections.

Because of liability, some dealers will not sell a beam without a signed design.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 12-13-05, 08:50 PM
L
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Another way to state what Concretemasonry said -- we can't see it.

The conversion WILL require a permit. To span 17+ ft., whatever you can use for a header is going to HAVE to be engineered. A glulam MAY work, or it may have to be a microlam, or it may have to be a steel I-beam. There are simply TOO many other factors involved for anybody in here to tell you the RIGHT answer. (Where do you live? What CODE do you have to build to? What's the load factors that you are dealing with? How are you going to support the beam? What type of soil is involved? And that's just STARTING to scratch the surface of the factors involved!!!)
 
  #4  
Old 12-19-05, 03:16 PM
C
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As someone looking to do a similar project in the next 5 years or so, how much would the design of something like this run?

I've never worked with structural engineers, and have no ballpark idea of what 'doing it right' would cost.

Any (really really) rough estimates?
 
  #5  
Old 01-01-06, 09:47 AM
5
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I am not an engineer, but am just offering a guess:

Site visit: 2 to 3 hours. Office design time: 3 to 5 hours. $150 per hour = $750 to $1200. I think a lot depends on the existing foundation. This project may require some footers for the posts.

Depending on where you live, I suppose the hourly could range anywhere from $100 to $350.
Remember that you need a registered professional engineer, who will have to put his stamp (and reputation, and liability) on the drawing.
 

Last edited by 594tough; 01-01-06 at 09:50 AM. Reason: add
  #6  
Old 01-02-06, 10:37 AM
sjpiro
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Thanks to all. I just had a structural engineer review what I wanted to do and removing a bearing wall that long will require some type of mid-support of the beam considering I want to use a 9 1/4 in beam. I think I'm safer with a 9 ft opening going from one room to the other.

Like you guys have ben saying it's a lot more compicated than meets the eye. Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 05-24-07, 07:39 AM
R
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What Did He Say

Are You Using A Microlam.......what Are You Supporting It With,
 
  #8  
Old 05-24-07, 07:02 PM
L
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rockaru,

Look at the dates when this thread was started. It's 18 months old!! Some of those who posted here are long gone. If you have a question regarding a similar project, start a new thread and ask it.

Thanks,

Lefty
 
 

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