Splicing a ridge board

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  #1  
Old 12-12-06, 09:31 AM
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Splicing a ridge board

I am making an addition to my house, and will be roof framing shortly. For a gable roof with a 30 foot, 2x12 ridge board with 2X10 rafters, 16" oc, 8:12 pitch, what is the BEST way to splice a ridge board? I haven't found any details of this on other plans I have seen, and I think the cost and delivery of this piece of lumber would be very high (if I can find it). I live in the Los Angeles region in a high wind area, and of course, earthquake measures are necessary too. Any help would be appreciated. By the way, this is a great website!
 
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Old 12-19-06, 02:01 AM
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Follow the same general rules of splicing wall dbl top plates, 48",
Cut the ridge to length to fall between the 1st common rafters on each side of the splice.
Rip two pieces of 2x10x46-1/2" @ 33-3/4 degrees, glue and nail between the common rafters in a manner similar to pressure blocking.
Make the length adjustment to the four common rafters affected.
 
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Old 12-19-06, 05:29 AM
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I am not trying to throw water on your fire, but you had better check with your building permit department to see if splicing a ridge board is even allowed there. For some reason that brings up a red flag in my mind. They may make you put up trusses instead of rafters. The safe thing and smart thing to do is to check with them first. Then if they say its ok, then ask them how they want the splice made. They are the inspectors and they will want it their way. Good Luck
 
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Old 01-26-07, 11:04 AM
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Thanks, Jack.
I have gotten into the habit of writing down questions on correct procedure as they come up, to ask my inspector. He's gotten used to it, and I implement (nearly) all his suggestions on optional methods. Still, I like to propose ideas rather than just ask him what to do, so he will not get annoyed at having to school a DIYer.
Have you used Snoonyb's technique or any other splices without trusses? I want to maintain some clear attic room to use as recreational space.
 
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Old 01-27-07, 08:04 AM
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In a properly raftered building, the ridge carries no vertical load so the splice is not structurally significant. You just need to keep it from shearing horizontally until the sheathing is on and everything is tightened up.

Start framing from your gable end and work backwards towards the perpendicular ridge with the dimensional lumber that works for you. Tie in another length of ridge between the rafters and just keep everything plumb and level. You can use full blocking glued and nailed between rafters and ripped to the angle of your roof pitch.
 
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Old 01-27-07, 08:15 PM
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GRUNGE_RIDER,

You are here in California where some things are not the same as other areas in the country. In California the ridge is considering load bearing in normal cases. The CBC wnats to take half the load to the ridge to stop the downward forces from the rafters on the top plates. 2x10 may not be adequate for insulation unless you go to rigid insulation or the special r-30 that fits in 7 1/2". Ridge splicing is not normally allowed here unless you post up at the joint which may or not be possible depending upon the spans. For all these reasons it may be more suitable to truss the roof.

I would definately check wioth the inspectors as you are in one of the toughest regions to build even in California.

I hope this helps.

Brian Garrison
 
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Old 02-06-07, 10:53 AM
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Brian,
My inspector came yesterday, and answered the question. Very simple: an angled butt splice with the sharp ends toenailed. The splice should cross the ends of rafters. Since we know that the ridge of a (non-trussed) roof is in compression, this splice is fine, and is acceptable in my area.
This brought about a discussion about drainage, and all the water collected on the roof must exit to the street. The street is uphill. More digging. Pumping. AAAARGH!! I feel another new thread coming in a few months . . .
 
 

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