pipes interrupting firecode drywall

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Old 07-27-10, 04:49 PM
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pipes interrupting firecode drywall

I've been fixing up the ceiling in my garage, which is under living space. The ceiling joists need to be covered with 5/8" drywall since the furnace is in the garage.
But there are plumbing lines going in and out of the space between the ceiling joists, and running parallel to the ceiling joists, where the drywall would go.
So the best I can do is to fill up the space between the pipes with pieces of drywall.
Is it code-legal for the drywall to be interrupted by pipes?
The drain pipes from the bathroom have to go through the garage ceiling, so there must be some kind of allowance for the drywall being interrupted by pipes.
Also, I suppose to satisfy the building code, I should seal up the gaps between the drywall and the pipes with something. What? Some kind of fire-retardant foam? "Great stuff"?
thanks
Laura
 
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Old 07-30-10, 04:38 AM
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Laura, the drywall can't be interrupted. What you should plan on is building a small soffit around where the pipes run along the ceiling and have continuous drywall. If the pipes penetrate the drywall, you should not use great stuff, but an approved fire code red sealant, after you put drywall as close to the pipes as possible. You can find it in the caulking section or in the electrical section of the big box stores.
 
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Old 07-30-10, 06:44 AM
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The drywall can be interrupted, but it must be firestopped correctly.They sell fire seal rings that go around your pipes and attach to the drywall. then the whole assembly gets fire caulked. I agree, dont use great stuff. You can get approved fire caulk in a caulk tube or in a bucket and use a spackle knife. Check this site out

this is a system i think will work for you.

Through wall firestopping

and this is there main site

firestop systems selector
 
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Old 07-31-10, 06:08 AM
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So basically the drywall can't be interrupted because you are firestopping the interruption, right EJ? I would still soffit any area where the pipes run horizontal and below the sheetrock plane, even if just for aesthetics, unless the drywall can be fit between the pipes and joisting.
 
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Old 08-01-10, 01:41 PM
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I'm planning to build a box around the worst part, but it's complicated. It's going to look like three boxes joined together.
I asked at Lowe's for "firestop caulk" and they showed me a silicone sealant in a tube. It's expensive. This makes sense if you are sealing around pipes that are small and flexible going up into the ceiling.
I didn't know there was firestop sealant in buckets. It's similar to joint compound?
For sealing next to the wall and around fixtures that aren't movable, it seems like joint compound ought to be OK - since it's what people would use to seal junctions in the drywall ceiling. I don't quite know what to do around the huge drain pipes that go up into the ceiling, into the bathroom above. They aren't movable, but joint compound doesn't seem like the right thing, and it would require huge amounts of the firestop silicone sealant. Firestop foam perhaps, there was some of that at Lowe's. The huge drain pipes slowly slope up into the ceiling, and I'd rather not box around them.
 
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Old 08-02-10, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler View Post
So basically the drywall can't be interrupted because you are firestopping the interruption, right EJ? I would still soffit any area where the pipes run horizontal and below the sheetrock plane, even if just for aesthetics, unless the drywall can be fit between the pipes and joisting.
Correct. There are only a couple of situations where a soffit is actually needed by code. The only one i can remember off the top of my head is elevator machine rooms. Those rooms by code cant have anything else in them except for whatevers required by the elevator itself, i.e: no plumbing pipes, electrical pipes, HVAC ducts, unless they are for the elevator. Usually when it comes to firestopping walls and floors, that 3M stuff i linked earlier is the key. Ive never seen a silicone firecaulk, nor would i trust a silicone firecaulk. Traditionally, firecaulk is intumescent, meaning it swells when it heats up.

They also sell fireblock pillows that can be used to fill in big voids and then you can firecaulk around the pillows to save the amount of caulk you actually need.
 
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Old 09-09-10, 09:22 PM
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Second ElectricJoeNJ's suggestion on using the firestop. Don't really like the pillows though, always seem a little precarious to me..
 
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Old 09-10-10, 05:46 AM
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Nothing wrong with the pillows, in fact, if the void is over a certain size you have to use the pillows. There made with the same material that rotten cotton is made from, it doesnt burn. You can blow torch the hell outta it, it wont burn..
 
 

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