What do Mechanical Drawings need to include?

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  #1  
Old 12-02-17, 04:48 PM
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What do Mechanical Drawings need to include?

I am doing a bathroom remodel and replacing the main electrical panel. City needs before and after drawings for electrical, plumbing and mechanical. Electrical and plumbing is easy, well sort of. But mechanical......What does that need to be. I won't be altering anything structural, or HVAC. What do I need to show in a before and after mechanical drawing?

skeeter
 
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Old 12-02-17, 04:51 PM
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Mechanical Plans

New dwellings require:
heating/cooling load calculations
duct layout
complete mechanical layout and the equipment list (type and size) including exhaust system for kitchen, baths and dryer, venting systems and combustion make up air for fuel-burning appliances prepared and signed by a licensed HVAC contractor, or architect or mechanical engineer with sealed drawings.
For alterations or additions to existing dwellings, the same requirements apply. However, the applicant has the option of attaching the Mechanical Plan Requirement Waiver form, signed by the property owner, to all sets of drawings. This allows the required information to bypass mechanical plan review and be reviewed at a later date by the field inspector at the time of the mechanical inspection.
When adding or replacing exterior units, a scaled, certified plat is required. It must clearly indicate the location of the new or replacement unit(s).
Basic idea but every local is different...
 
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Old 12-02-17, 06:00 PM
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So just remodeling doesn't require all the licensed sealed engineering drawings stuff. Just need to draw up what I currently have on the before drawing and what modifications I am making on the after drawing. The only thing I am adding in the ventilation section is a bathroom fan, so that would be added. I saw on one youtube video that Mechanical drawings must also include electrical and plumbing too. That would make that a busy drawing. Is that correct?

skeeter
 
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Old 12-02-17, 06:07 PM
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Do I need to show the entire house or just the areas I am remodeling, ie bathroom and main electrical panel?

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Old 12-02-17, 09:59 PM
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The answers to your questions depends entirely upon what your local AHJ (Authority Having Jurisdiction) requires. This would be the agency or department that issues the permits and makes the inspections. Generally speaking, for a homeowner doing his own work a simple hand-drawn sketch of the work is sufficient but ONLY your local official can give you the correct answer for your location.
 
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Old 12-03-17, 04:17 AM
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I did mine seperate when I did my bathroom addition..

1. A plumping simple line drawing ( Showing piping /venting only isometric plumbing diagram
2. An electrical drawing. Showing outlets, lights, switches etc.
3. A mechanical drawing showing windows, bathroom fixtures shower etc
4. Elevation of house top and side view in relation to the new dormer. ( Basically a survey . Our surveys were lost in a fire at town hall in 1977. So town is trying to make all homeowners do their own when renovations are made)







 
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Old 12-03-17, 08:23 AM
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That's good to know. I am making a small list of questions to ask the city, but trying to be as prepared as I can. I am not changing any structure or vent pipes or sewer lines. Just replacing the plumbing with pex to the bathroom, electrical to the bathroom but I am replacing the entire electrical panel. Hope that doesn't create to many problems. LOL

Thanks for your help.

skeeter
 
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Old 12-03-17, 08:33 AM
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Just replacing the plumbing with pex to the bathroom,
Once you add pex to a home often an additional relief valve of 100 psi needs to be added somewhere... FYI

And with electrical AFAIK there are all new GFCI AFCI rules out and about..

But your electrician should know... ( Im just a plumber)
 
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Old 12-04-17, 11:58 AM
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What are good spots for a relief valve?

skeeter
 
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Old 12-04-17, 12:17 PM
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098268010145 0185209 1/2 53-100

Anywhere on the water system...

53 Pressure Relief Valves, Pressure-Only Relief Valves, Water Safety & Flow Control - Watts
 
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Old 12-04-17, 03:27 PM
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Does it need to exhaust to a drain, outside, garage floor, bathtub.

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Old 12-04-17, 03:34 PM
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Thinking about it, maybe before the hot and cold water split. That way it would handle both hot and cold water systems at the same time.

skeeter
 
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Old 12-04-17, 04:36 PM
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The water systems are all connected... It dont matter where it goes...

Common spot is near HWH because that also has a relief valve... Where ever that relief valve goes the new relief valve is piped alongside it...
 
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