Did my contractor remove a supporting post?

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-06-20, 05:23 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Did my contractor remove a supporting post?

Hello all,

​​​​​I have a contractor from hell who is for sure getting fired, but I've already overpaid and want to at least have him complete enough work before I send him out the door. The main issue we are arguing is the post he removed may have been load bearing.

The project was basically to remove a pantry wall in order to expand the size of our kitchen.

There is a big metal beam running from the beginning of the kitchen and ends where the post for the pantry used to be. My guess is the beam was also overlapping with one from the garage side.

The contractor's main argument is that he only removed a 2x4 which could not have been load bearing. Be that as it may, can anyone here tell if the post had to stay? Any advice would be highly appreciated.


Full project

Different angle

Beam from garage side on the left looks to be cut. The metal beam ends with no support of any kind.

Different angle

Showing kitchen width where the last support point (wall) is for the beam.

Floor where post used to sit. You can see a footing and the house foundation.

Ceiling of basement underneath, shows another beam above where the original post was.
 
Sponsored Links

Popular Reply

 
11-06-20, 05:38 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
XSleeper
XSleeper is offline
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,199
Received 714 Votes on 661 Posts
Structural changes, such as the remodeling you are doing, typically require the input of a structural engineer in order to get permits, and the work is inpected along the way to ensure it is done correctly. If you haven't gotten the advice of a structural engineer, I would advise you to do that as soon as possible.

I don't think there is any amount of photos that can allow anyone to figure this out without being there in person. If you are doing this without permits, that's not very smart.
 
  #2  
Old 11-06-20, 05:38 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 26,199
Received 714 Votes on 661 Posts
Structural changes, such as the remodeling you are doing, typically require the input of a structural engineer in order to get permits, and the work is inpected along the way to ensure it is done correctly. If you haven't gotten the advice of a structural engineer, I would advise you to do that as soon as possible.

I don't think there is any amount of photos that can allow anyone to figure this out without being there in person. If you are doing this without permits, that's not very smart.
 
marksr, PJmax voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 11-06-20, 06:48 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 59,717
Received 1,180 Votes on 1,093 Posts
I'm not a pro in this forum but I can see a problem there.
There is no visible means of support for the end of the steel I beam.
 
  #4  
Old 11-06-20, 10:19 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,687
Received 394 Votes on 368 Posts
Steel beams do not simply float in space like what you are showing, I question what the heck is supporting that thing as it stands and personally would be putting something up there as a temp support until this is resolved!
 
  #5  
Old 11-07-20, 06:28 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, yes already spoke with one who agrees the beam shouldn't just float and that the issue is rather obvious. He advised to get a supporting column in place until i can get a professional contractor and the appropriate permits which I honestly did not know were needed not was I informed of any structural changes. I literally just found out about this yesterday and trying to get it fixed asap. Thanks for the input.
Also the smart guy who did this work was fired.

 
  #6  
Old 11-07-20, 07:05 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,408
Received 128 Votes on 119 Posts
I would get a structural engineer in there asap. Steel beams are rarely unsupported at their ends. That steel beam is likely supporting a significant load, and you don't want to leave it unsupported for long.

I don't want to be alarmist, but it's this kind of thing that cause houses to fall down. I have no idea how bad it may or may not be... but I hope it's not as bad as it looks.
 
  #7  
Old 11-08-20, 05:39 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,984
Received 681 Votes on 628 Posts
Go to the home center or lumber yard and get a steel lally column. They are easily adjustable, steel support posts and would be easy for one person to install temporarily under the end of your steel beam.
 
  #8  
Old 11-08-20, 04:20 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2020
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Done, the beam had come down a good inch and a half. I was able to bring it up about an inch before my terrible wrench gave up, I need a bigger wrench for better leverage for the last bit.

Thank you all again for your quick advise.

Now waiting on an engineer and permits. But at least that beam rests on something other than my drywall ceiling.

One more lesson learned.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: