Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Flooring, Floor Coverings and Coatings Center > Bamboo and Exotic Wood Floors
Reload this Page >

Floating solid tongue and groove Bamboo flooring--can it be done???

Floating solid tongue and groove Bamboo flooring--can it be done???

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-15-12, 10:12 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Floating solid tongue and groove Bamboo flooring--can it be done???

Hi all,
I've been led to believe that floating solid tongue and groove flooring, bamboo or otherwise, won't work. That was until I found this post on another site:
[TABLE="class: tborder noskimwords, width: 100%, align: center"]
[TR]
[TD="class: alt1, bgcolor: #FFFFFF"]This must be a young installer.
Before locking mechanisms were used, you had tounge and grove that would be glued together and that will still work. Not as easy as a locking mechanism, but possible. The solid bamboo doesn't expand the same as solid wood flooring and so it will be ok, you must have a underlayment as was mentioned.
[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
Right now, my floor is concrete with old linoleum tiles glued onto it. I floated a click-lock engineered bamboo floor in one of the room, but it's expensive!

Can I glue "solid" bamboo together and float it? What glue would I use? Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 12-16-12, 12:16 AM
S
Member
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 83
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Check the manufacturer's installation instructions. Many can be installed as a floating floor, when using Elastilon underlayment. However, remember that it's also an added cost.
 
  #3  
Old 12-16-12, 04:50 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
As Seattle2k alluded to, I believe by the time you buy the bamboo in 5/8" thickness (it can be glued), the cost of the additional glue and time to install will far surpass a good click lock engineered flooring, since there will be no glue and installation will zip at a pace far quicker than the glue up.
 
  #4  
Old 12-16-12, 07:37 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
When purchasing the flooring, there should be markings on the sample board as to whether or not you can float the floor or if it needs to be glued. If no sample boards exist, consult someone at the store or as mentioned, go online and determine best practices. If you can float, each manufacture recommends an appropriate glue for the species you have chosen. Choose a good vapor barrier and sound deadening underlayment. I think cost wise, it works out in the wash, if it is easier to put in, it costs more. If it is harder to install, it cost less, but makes up for it in labor to install. Many times a wash.

The advantage of a click and go is that you can pull it apart and replace sections that show wear of damage if needed in the future a lot easier than if is is glued together.
 
  #5  
Old 12-16-12, 12:27 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 23
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks guys,
My business usually goes down during the winter holidays, so what I have right now is more time and less money. Plus, we've got a new baby coming in Jan, so I'm trying to get the house up to par. I actually considered laying down inexpensive masonite and finishing it! But my wife panned the idea...

Seattle2k, I hadn't heard of Elastilon. It looks like a great product but comes to about $2 / square foot, offsetting the savings of not buying a click-lock floor.

I'm going to be calling around to sellers/manufacturers trying to find a T&G floor that can be floated, as czizzi suggested. In a sense, ALL "solid" bamboo is engineered and stable, though, so I don't see why it couldn't work with most of these floors. My concern is that the pieces are usually laminated in the same direction--which won't be as strong as a cross lamination... Then again, maybe I could go with the stranded bamboo. That stuff seems to be tougher.

Have any of you guys floated a glued, tongue and groove floor, of any kind, before? I would also consider gluing the whole thing down, but the trend seems to be toward floated floors for good reason.
Thanks again for the suggestions.
 
  #6  
Old 12-17-12, 07:48 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,388
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Yes I have floated glued floors with excellent results. Work with your flooring supplier to find a product that suits your situation. Again, using the correct adhesive for your floor helps to provide for superior bonding and a long lasting result.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: