Looking to install Bamboo!

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  #1  
Old 09-26-14, 10:15 PM
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Looking to install Bamboo!

Hello again,

First, I'm a total novice when it comes to flooring so I have no objections to asking for help.

I'm currently removing all the old flooring on the main floor, carpet and vinyl. When finished, my plan was to have the local shop install a Pergo wood with a laminate in the kitchen and baths. However, in my other thread on removing that stuff it was suggested I look into bamboo. I'm liking what I have seen so far but I would certainly listen to any advice.

What's the best backing?
Is there a preferred seller or brand or type?
What's the best way to cut the pieces to fit?
Has anyone made patterns from the boards?

These are just a few of the many questions I expect to come up. Is anyone willing to share?
 
  #2  
Old 09-27-14, 05:15 AM
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OK, this is an extension of your other thread. I can't copy and paste until Apple decides to fix IOS8.



1). I used the red backer with white dots from HD. Runs about $55 for 100 sf
2) dealt with in the other thread.
3) cut using a miter saw and table saw, or jig saw, or circle saw. Cut from the backmside when possible. Kiss allyour blades before you start,asthey will,be too dull to cut butter when you are through. Aluminum oxide is tough.
4) due to the locking mechanism built in, which is required to keep is all together, you won't be able to pattern the wood like you can cleat/staple down flooring.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 08:20 AM
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Is there an existing install thread?
 
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Old 09-27-14, 08:29 AM
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No, but the same train of thought. Having everyone on the same track helps sometimes. By referring to your old thread, much of your preliminary information is available. You're good. Carry on.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 09:27 AM
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Can someone link the other thread? Oops, never mind. Here it is for background...http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ru...ml#post2328710
 
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Old 09-27-14, 06:00 PM
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Remember in your search, that not all bamboo is created equal. Look up reviews and things like Janko(?) hardness.
 
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Old 09-27-14, 06:13 PM
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Yes, I've noticed that already.
 
  #8  
Old 09-29-14, 11:13 PM
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It looks like bamboo has lost out to a hardwood.

Chandler? Would it be best if I started yet another thread in Hardwoods?
 
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Old 09-30-14, 04:11 AM
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Oh, gosh NO. We read all the threads. Tag any of your questions here on this thread. We'll keep up with you.

Are you planning on staple/cleat down full 3/4" hardwoods? Good choice. You do have wood subflooring and not concrete, yes?
 
  #10  
Old 09-30-14, 02:09 PM
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I don't know what you mean by "tag".

No no, I'm not that ambitious. It's a 3/8 click lock from HD. It was the right color and style.

I plan to do the entire main floor, except the bathroom. It's about 800 sq ft. I would like to do it as one continuous floor, but I'm told you can't do that. You have to put a transition in each doorway. Is this correct? Any way around it?

What about non-doored passageways like a hall coming off an open room? Does that require a transition? Several rooms also have doorless passages.

How about very small "rooms", like closets?
 
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Old 09-30-14, 02:22 PM
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Anytime you change directions, or go over a certain length, you probably need a transition.

Uhhh...not to rag on you...but the 3/8 stuff is pretty low end from what the Pro's say here. I think 5/8 is the better choice.

You can mention brands and provide links...that's allowed.
 
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Old 10-01-14, 11:18 AM
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So what's the big problem with 3/8?
 
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Old 10-01-14, 05:38 PM
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GotToGO, and Vic, in engineered flooring, 3/8" would be a minimum, and 5/8" a plus size. Due to the way the engineered flooring is made, it has strengths that laminate only dreams of. The bedroom we did last week is 3/8" over a good underlayment. It laid superbly fast and wifey liked it. Very good point.
 
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Old 10-01-14, 05:50 PM
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Good to know Larry...boy that just seems thin.
 
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Old 10-01-14, 07:34 PM
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Ok then, 3/8 it is!

I'm approaching an actual timeline for this so there will be more very soon.
 
  #16  
Old 10-02-14, 04:11 PM
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And we're off!

Ok then,

With delivery and acclimation I am looking at 2 weeks to lay my first board. I have read the manufacturer's instructions, watched a few install videos, and read a few "How To's" (surprisingly I didn't see one on this site).

Everything is pretty generic, and I understand that the majority of this is pretty generic. But I've been trying to think this project through and and I feel like I need more info, so let's start here.


1. Sheet Rock Gap - My sheet rock doesn't go all the way to the floor. It leaves about 3/4" to the plywood and about 1/2" to the wood behind it. I expect this is normal, but what does that mean for my 3/8 perimeter gap? Is it 3/8 from the face of the sheet rock or from the wood behind it?

2. Underlayment - Lowe's has a 100' roll of "regular" stuff for $25. Is this adequate or do I need to spring for the $50 a roll stuff?

3. Appliances - I heard I shouldn't put the flooring under the fridge and stove. Is this true?

4. Fireplace 1/4 Round - How do you attach the 1/4 to the stone of the fireplace?

5. Table Saw - What blade do I need for cutting boards?

6. Fine Cuts - Any tips on cutting boards to fit into odd angles? I have few. Coping saw? This type of work is one my biggest shortcomings.

7. Transitions - This is a sore spot for me. Transitions are the single worst aspect of this type of flooring. I hate them. But I've heard they have to be in every doorway (I mentioned this earlier). However, the manufacturer states nothing
about transitions. Only that spans longer than 24 linear feet need an increased gap. Is there some specification on where and when transitions are to be used?

That's it for now.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 04:36 PM
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1) Lay your flooring flush with the face of the sheetrock. That will give you the appropriate expansion space and your base will cover any boogers.
2) I like the Roberts flooring underlayment. Just a preference Roberts AirGuard 100 sq. ft. 40in. x 30ft x 1/8 in. Premium 3-in-1 Underlayment-70-105 at The Home Depot
3) It is OK to put the flooring under appliances, just not under cabinets. Appliances generally are movable units, whereas cabinets are not.
4) I usually scribe the flooring to the convolutions of the stone. If it is relative smooth, like brick, you can apply the shoe molding with PL Advanced 8X adhesive.
You can also undercut the mortar joint on the floor with a grinder, allowing you to slip the flooring under the edge.
5) A blade you can afford to kiss goodbye I prefer a 60 or 80 tooth carbide blade on the table saw as well as the miter saw. Cut the flooring from the bottom if possible. Less stress on the carbide from the aluminum oxide that way.
6) A jig saw is usually good for the odd cuts.
7) You can get away from the "written in stone" in every door way edict. Provided it doesn't exceed the manufacturer's maximum run. If it does, then install a threshold in the doorways. You don't want to fight it.

8) Don't forget to undercut all your door trim and facings to allow the flooring to slip under for a neat transition from the main floor to the obstruction. I use a multimaster with a piece of flooring scrap glued to a matching piece of underlayment to obtain the correct height.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 07:57 PM
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Excellent info, thanks!

You kinda lost me on #4. But I'll wait until the carpet is pulled up so I can see exactly what's there.

A jig saw eh? I got one. Any special type of blade?

8. Is there some trick to figuring out how to mark those special cuts (like a "V" cut) on a board so they fit into those special places? I skipped that day in wood shop.
 
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Old 10-02-14, 08:32 PM
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You'll see what I mean when you get the carpet pulled, I believe. If not, we can elaborate. What type jig saw blade?? Several, cheap, 6 or 8 TPI will work. Now, you lost me on #8. I was speaking of your door jambs. No V cuts, flat straight cuts to allow the flooring to slip under it.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 01:24 PM
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I was referring to special cuts when the end of a board needs to butt up against something not straight. In my case its a fireplace. It juts out at an angle so the end of the board will need some kind of "V" cut.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 04:31 PM
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Got it. Lay the flooring in place, slide it up to the obstruction, use a straight edge to trace down from the end. Then, lay the flooring as close to straight in the position it will rest in and do the same thing on the other dimension. Don't worry about pencil marks, as they will wipe off. Sharpies...not so much.
 
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Old 10-03-14, 07:19 PM
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Sorry, I don't follow you.

Have you got a diagram of what you mean?

Is there a name for it that I can lookup?
 
  #23  
Old 10-07-14, 09:33 AM
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I guess I can figure out the cutting later. Let's move on.
 
  #24  
Old 10-07-14, 10:42 PM
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So, as usual, plans change.

The cost of the bathroom tile install from HD kept going up, eventually doubling. That just wasn't acceptable so I had to fall back to plan B. Which is me installing a vinyl floor. It's not that big of a deal, I liked the vinyl I found. It's just that I'm a little busy with that at the moment as I want the bathroom done before starting on the wood floor. But I should have the bathroom done tomorrow, I hope, and then get back to figuring out the wood floor install.

Thanks again to the people on this site. I'm sure I could do this on my own, it just wouldn't be done right.
 
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Old 10-08-14, 04:07 AM
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If you are installing the bamboo you can also do the tile. less than 100 dollars of tools and you can have a tile floor for close to the installed price of vinyl.
 
  #26  
Old 10-10-14, 07:51 PM
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I looked at doing the tile myself and decided it was above my skillset.
 
 

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