Refinishing Duro Design Cork

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Old 04-12-15, 05:11 PM
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Refinishing Duro Design Cork

From the instructions it looks pretty easy. Does anyone know the shelf life of Duro Design MP765 Varnish after the catalyst is added?
 
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Old 04-12-15, 05:57 PM
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I don't know anything about the product you mention but generally when you have a catalyzed product, a two-component product that is mixed just prior to use, the term used is pot life and it is generally measured in minutes to hours depending on the product. Shelf life is how long the UNmixed components remain viable.

I have some 100% solids epoxy paint that I was given some thirty years ago. The individual components of each can have separated over the years but I have tried mixing them individually and then taking approximately the correct proportions from each can and mixing them together. I tried to find information on this product via the Internet and while I couldn't find the exact product number I did find that the US Navy recommended a shelf life of only one year. The instructions I did find mentioned a pot life of about 45 minutes, depending on ambient temperature (70 degrees as I recall) with higher temperatures giving a shorter pot life and lower temperatures giving a longer pot life.

Well, after testing I found that in my garage at about 50 degrees it took two days for the material to harden when spreading to a rather heavy coating and the material left in the cup would take at least four days to completely harden. I suspect that it continued to harden for several more days but it is all as a result of a chemical action and not due to the evaporation of any solvents.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 04:51 AM
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It should say on the paint can label what the pot life is after the catalyst is mixed in. Often the paint needs to 'work' for a set time after being mixed before it's ready for application. You then have a set amount of time where the coating is considered good for applying. Sometime after that time frame the coating will become unusable. How much catalyst is mixed in, climate conditions and how the coating is formulated all play a part in determining the length of pot life. Once mixed, the coating should never be returned to the container as any left over mixed material will contaminate the rest!

Shelf life can vary greatly - it all depends on how/where it was stored. I've opened and used cans of paint that were several yrs old that were still good and have had paint that was only a few months old go bad.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 11:06 AM
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Thanks Mark

Shelf life was an incorrect term. Pot life is much better and what I was looking for. I am doing this for a neighbor and they bought the material. I haven't seen it yet. I downloaded instructions which say add all of the catalyst, but don''t mention what the useful working time is. It must be long enough to apply two coats 2-3 hrs apart. Thanks again.
 
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Old 04-13-15, 11:56 AM
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Not sure I'd mix the entire amount at one time, it's ok to mix half at a time [or any portion that you can reasonably keep the portions correct. Surely it states on the paint can label what the pot life [or working life] is. That info is probably available online also but sometimes they hide stuff making life harder for some of us
 
 

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