storage?


  #1  
Old 10-04-02, 05:56 PM
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storage?

2 story townhouse, 2 years old, 2X4 trusses, can i raise a floor above the blown in insulation and keep old junk up there? or are these trusses too weak. not too much junk, just Xmas stuff, etc
 
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Old 10-06-02, 12:03 PM
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Arrow Old Junk

Other than seasonal items the best thing to do is GET RID OF it.
If you haven't used it in a year, you probably won't ever use it.
Sell it and buy new stuff IF you need it.
Most ppl just end up buying new stuff anyway becasue it's easier than searching through 15 boxes in a hot attic.
 
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Old 10-07-02, 06:37 PM
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amen to that

unfortunately my new bride does not see it this way, wonder if i could store her up there?
 
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Old 10-07-02, 06:59 PM
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Talking Well

If she wants to be aropund her "junk" that bad LOL
I just had a garage sale last weekend, everything that I couldn't sell went to goodwill, NOT back in the house !!

But to answer your question, I don't think you would have a problem storing LIGHT boxes up there.
Try to build up over a near a wall if possible, the wall will help support the load.
 
  #5  
Old 10-08-02, 07:09 AM
gubs18
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general rule of thumb on trusses

I am also thinking of doing the same. Found a very gd book (Stanley Home Improvements at Borders Books) that answers that exact question.

Recalling from memory (which isnít so good, but can reconfirm), Iím pretty sure they said a 2x6í trusses that were 8í or less in length, would support a floor and some storage (i.e. greater than 8ílong would need a sister trusses attached (sister trusses is where you screw the larger width board to the side of the existing smaller brd).

If you would like, I can go back and reread(?).

Also, how is the ventilation up there? by looking at your member name, I assume you did that homework already(?).
 

Last edited by gubs18; 10-21-02 at 10:22 AM.
  #6  
Old 10-21-02, 10:00 AM
Tuberocity
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and I have not laughed yet while on this site, but this thread broke the streak. As Gubs18 stated, the attic over my garage in a previous house had an area about 9 ft wide. I bought cheap 1 x 4 pine boards, and spaced them about 2" apart. You could walk around if bent over, and I assumed if the joists would hold my 240 pounds, and I felt secure walking on the joists, it would support quite a bit of weight spaced out. I stored quite a few heavy objects up there for years, and saw no ill effects to the structure. Every situation is different, I think common sense comes into play here. I'm sure you would not want to store your car up there, but most attics are suitable for at least objects of less than a 100 pounds, and if you walk around up there avoiding stepping into the ceiling and all feels secure, go for it. I would be remiss If I did not state this is in S.California with very little humidity and moisture. You may want to seal objects with trash bags or not use the space at all in some areas.
If using my advice do not use the cross boards as stepping areas, use the joists, you may fall through the ceiling. I couldn't fit large pieces of plywood, so used the boards instead.
 
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Old 10-21-02, 09:10 PM
bungalow jeff
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Attic framing will support 10#/sf at a minimum, which is good for luggage and boxes of Christmas ornaments.
 
  #8  
Old 10-22-02, 06:36 AM
Tuberocity
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Yes on average I would agree, but the previous poster refered to an 8 ft width, and I was refering to a 9 ft width, but in any case my 240 pound body was up in the attic walking around do this and that all the time. It's a furnace up there here in CA! I was walking around on widths up to 14' wide with no problem, but your right I don't think I would store heavy objects there. This is probably most peoples case, as I had an attached garage 9 ft wide, 2 car lenghts long with plenty of bracing. Like I said common sense should prevail here, if not sure, don't do it! Tom
 
 

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