Water in the house and slopes

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-26-00, 10:31 AM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

I have some water in the basement with the recent rain showers. I have been reading about what to do next outside. I was going to raise the slope outside, but is that the correct thing to do? My gutter downspouts need to be extended too, which I am in the process of completing. If the slope needs to be increased, how do high do I increase it?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-24-00, 09:19 PM
Guest
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Cool

You may be jumping to conclusions. You didn't say if it always happens or is a one time deal.

Simple answer 5 degrees will do. Anything above that is gravy.

Generally the first thing is to collect all the drains off the house in some manner and direct them away.

Can be simple or can be a system like a buried 4" PVC slip drain pipes made for the purpose.

I like those systems. Sometimes its just extending the individual drainpipes using elbows to turn the direction and put it horizontal say at least six feet away from the foundation.

Or just use what called Frog Foot. Thing that looks like a frogman's flipper. Lays on the ground at a sloping angle and directs the downspout water into a horizontal direction away from the house.

The slope should be sufficient so the water can't find a path to run back toward the house. Ten degrees is super, twenty better yet. It just shouldn't able to run back.

Generally it finds a sneaky little path when the overall slope looks good.

Once a drainage system is built to ensure all water is directed away and the leakage continues it on to other things.

Usually getting the water some distance away, it does not soak in enough to perk back to cause problems. If it does, maybe a dedicated buried piping system to carry it far enough away to stop the problem.

Lots of options, many different ways to get into problems, the big picture always the same.

Collect and account for all drains, ensure the slope is enough so the actual flow can only go one way. Five degrees should be enough.

If you have a perk problem or high ground water or a spring running through the yard when its different solutions.

No simple one answer fits all situations but those are the general approach.

If its a one time deal, maybe super heavy storm or somebody changed part of the drain direction system while mowing the yard.




[This message has been edited by Rambler (edited May 25, 2000).]
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: