Basement Bath


  #1  
Old 12-29-02, 05:42 PM
Diesil_60
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Basement Bath

I have a roughed in bath in the lower level of my split level foyer. Which means that I have one large capped hole and one small capped hole. I want to put a toilet (no questions here) a tub and a shower stall. The question is, how do I drain both of these down the single hole? The drain is placed in a position for a shower stall, but is not in the right place.

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I would like to put the tub over the next to the Toilet with the shower stall at the end of the tub. How do I rig the drain pips?
 
  #2  
Old 12-29-02, 06:04 PM
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Diesil_60,

I hate to tell you this, it's called jackhammer time! There is no easy way to do what you propose without re-plumbing to accommdoate what you want. I would suggest laying out the exact locations of your fixtures and then go from there.

It may be easier to first check the small line and determine if this is a 2 inch line. It should be and this is can be used for the sink and tub/shower/sink. Don't forget about venting of these fixtures and this does include the toilet drain if it is more than 5 feet away from the main stack.

You should be obtaining a permit for this work and if necessary seek a plumber, if needed.

Hope this helps and Happy Holidays!
 
  #3  
Old 12-29-02, 06:53 PM
Diesil_60
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This is my first online bulletin board experience. I am impressed with the fast answers, thanks Doug.

I figured that I would need to jackhammer or maybe build a platform for the tub and shower stall. The opening in the floor is 2 inches. There is another capped off drain in the wall behind the toilet (next to my cloths washer drain) for the sink.

Desperation begs that I ask about the feasibility of the pedestal concept. If this will work, how much of a drop does the drain line have to have from the tub bottom to the roughed hole?
 
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Old 12-29-02, 07:09 PM
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Diesil,

Regarding the pedistal sink concept, this is feasible as long as you plan ahead - Pedistals can vary in how the stand is and this will effect your drain line location. you may want to purchase this first before doing your lines. I have attached a link for this application;

http://www.familyhandyman.com/200006/pedsink/

Issues regarding the tub is simple, it is based upon the p-trap that is used one attached to your tub drain assembly - simply put..dig some dirt out and provide room to and access to get to this when installing. You'll have to measure but I think I have always used approx. 12" from tub drain to bottom of hole.

I have attached some notes to think about regarding what you are proposing - Relatively common codes for plumbing in basements;

PLUMBING FIXTURES

Showers: Hinged shower doors shall open outward. All glass which encloses a shower shall be safety glazed. Shower heads shall be water-conserving with a maximum flow rate of 2.5 gallons per minute. All shower control valves shall be anti-scald with a hot water limit of 120F.

Lavatories (bathroom sinks): Lavatories shall have waste outlets not less than 1 inch in diameter. A strainer, pop-up stopper, crossbar or other device shall be provided to restrict the clear opening of the waste outlet. Faucets shall be water-conserving with a maximum flow rate of 2.2 gallons per minute at 60 psi.

Water closets (toilets): water closets shall be water-conserving low consumption at 1.6 gallons per flush and shall be provided with a flush tank or similar device designed and installed to supply water in sufficient quantity and flow to flush the contents of the fixture, to cleanse the fixture and refill the fixture trap.

Bathtubs: Bathtubs shall have outlets and overflows at least 1 inches in diameter, and the waste outlet shall be equipped with an approved stopper. All bathtub control valves shall be anti-scald with a hot water limit of 120F.

Sinks: Sinks shall be provided with waste outlets not less than 1 inches in diameter. A strainer, crossbar or other device shall be provided to restrict the clear opening of the waste outlet. Faucets shall be water-conserving with a maximum flow rate of 2.2 gallons per minute at 60 psi.

ACCESS

All cleanouts, valves, shut-offs and mechanical joints shall be accessible. Minimum clearance in front of cleanouts shall be 18 inches on 3 inches and larger pipes, and 12 inches on smaller pipes. Concealed cleanouts shall be provided with access of sufficient size to permit removal of the cleanout plug and rodding of the system. Cleanout plugs shall not be concealed with any permanent finishing material. Fixtures having concealed tubular traps shall be provided with an access panel or unobstructed utility space 12 inches in the least dimension

Again, your local building officials will have directions to what is required.

Hope this helps, if not let me know! You can send me e-mail if you want to have me look at a drawing!
 
  #5  
Old 01-02-03, 08:38 PM
1packrat
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Diesil_60
Just wondering how you decided to approach your problem. I have a very similar problem in that my shower drain is located in the wall framing ( which happens to be a 6" load wall). I would like to add a shower, which means that I will either have to build the shower on a platform or get out the jackhammer. I am leaning twards the platform. From what I read you need to put the shower on a 2x6 platform to get clearance for the trap. I only need to run the drain about 24" to get to where my drain is. Were you asking about putting the shower on a platform or buying a pedistal sink? Let me know what you are doing, or if anyone else has experiences with showers on platforms. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-03-03, 06:35 AM
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1packrat and Diesil_60,

Just for your information, regarding the platform concept, keep the following in mind;

Minimum ceiling height to be 7 feet. Clearance under beams and ductwork may be reduced to 6'6".

Bathroom showers are to be minimum 30" x 30" and are required to be finished 70 inches above the shower drain.

Didn't know how much room you had to play with for finished ceiling heights.

Have a great day!
 
  #7  
Old 01-04-03, 01:09 PM
1packrat
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Doug,
Thanks for the reply, I currently have 85" from the floor to the finished ceiling in the bathroom. I think I would have room for the platform. Does anyone know of a low profile shower drain/trap combination that would reduce my platform height? Or a shower pan with an integrated drain/trap? I see that they make items like this for the European market, but I can't seem to find anything in the US. Any suggestions? Can the 2x6 height be reduced any? Or am I just crazy and need to cut up the concrete and get it over with. Ouch! Thanks for the help!!
 
  #8  
Old 01-04-03, 03:25 PM
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1packrat,

From what you said in your first post, wouldn't it make more sense to break up the concrete and do it right? This platform idea still doesn't work in my mind and the plumbing issues will be difficult, at best. You're going to have to have a larger step (if not 2 steps) than a 2x6 and you still the p-trap and you still need it the right position. To top it off, you need to have the shower base on a solid base and it must not move. It seems that if you are going to do all this work that the bathroom should look like a nice bathroom, not done haphazardly.

What is stopping you from breaking out some concrete?
 
 

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