Enclosing the Basement Furnace Room

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  #1  
Old 02-22-03, 10:19 AM
JAKlaassen
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Enclosing the Basement Furnace Room

I would like to wall-off my furnace room. I am concerned about 3 things:

1) What is the min. door width required for a furnace room?

2) What do I need to do regarding ventalation? Both the hot water heater and furnace are in that room. The furnace has a type of pipe that gives the impression it takes in outside air for combustion, but the hot water heater does not. Can I simply put a "grill" or two in the door or wall?

3) We have a walkout basement and no very safe place for my family to go during a storm. Do you see any problem with using cement bricks instead of wood framing? Or is there a better way?

Thank you!
 
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Old 02-22-03, 10:53 AM
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JAKlaassen,

Hope this link helps, it does correspond to existing code requirements. You may also want to check with your local building inspector to confirm this or provide any additional requirements..

http://www.cityofmarion.org/bldg_ins...nt_finish.html

The link answers 1 and 2. #3 question has got me puzzled. I am assuming that you are talking about using brick or block to make a seperate 'safe room"? I see no harm in doing this but again you can ask your local inspector for advice on this issue. Just ensure that you are providng some type of ventilation within this room.

Hope this helps!
 
  #3  
Old 02-23-03, 01:00 AM
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Also framing in a furnace/utility room here. I was flipping through the hardware store ads & spotted a Louvered door with the following description:

~Provided ventilation for closets, bathrooms & furnace rooms.

Kinda makes sence I guess. Although I've never heard/seen a bathroom with a louvered door though.

Pro's & Con's of a louvered door for the utility room?
 
  #4  
Old 02-23-03, 05:33 AM
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Bluestraw,

I'd only use it for the furnace room but it's your choice. Depending on your heating system and how your heat ducts are run you may want to use a louvered door to allow more return air to be drawn out of these rooms as long as you have heat ducts going into them, it's your choice but the furnace room is a must.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 02-23-03, 05:53 AM
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Bluestraw,

I'll retract my statement. It is not a requirement to have a louvered door on the furnace room since you have fresh air intake available from the outside. You also may have to have a steel door for the furnace room. Similar also to the the other rooms - it is not a requirement but a suggestion on my part only.

Just wanted to make sure you understood the difference. Any doubts on any of this, as mentoned before, contact your local building official for confirmation.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 02-23-03, 11:35 AM
JAKlaassen
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Thanks for all the quick assistance!



This has really been helpful already. Much appreciated!
John
 
  #7  
Old 02-23-03, 01:39 PM
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JAKlaassen,

We aim to please!

Good Luck!
 
  #8  
Old 02-23-03, 03:58 PM
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Sealed Combustion Furnace

Your furnace is apparently a unit that has a fresh air supply and an exhaust flue pipe. To accompish this, it uses an inducer fan and the entire combustion compartment is sealed to prevent any contact with inside air.

If you have a forced air system, the blower moves air from inside the home to the furnace, where it is heated and then distributed throughout the home.

The water heater has what is known as an atmospheric draft flue. Unlike your furnace, the water heater uses air inside the utility room for combustion and since there is no inducer fan, it usually uses an equal amount of air that it uses for combustion to maintain chimney draft.

An average water heater will be about 40,000 BTU/hr. and that will require 1,200 cubic feet of air per hour for combustion.

I strongly recommend you check with your local building department for ventilation requirements.
 
  #9  
Old 02-24-03, 05:09 AM
dantis
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Fresh Air not a Problem..wanna conatin water

Hello,

Have finished the subfloor and begun framing. Will also be making a laundry/furnace/hot water heater room. Ideally, I would like to contain any water from leaving this room should something fail (hot water heater, washing machine etc) so it can't get to the rest of the basement considering that will be carpet, and this room will be vinyl (I think). Any suggestions? Obviously i can't seal up the door...but I would like to contain as much as possible. Thanks.

 
  #10  
Old 02-24-03, 11:46 AM
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Dan,

Maybe you did this backwards? Subfloor? This should have been done after ensuring you have a place for water to go to. It sounds like you have a raised floor system yet your water heater and furnace is sitting at a lower level?

It sounds like you have no floor drain within this room at present. I would recommend that you install a floor drain within this room. You could tie this into the existing laundry tub drain lines within the concrete. This is assuming that your floor will be pitched towards the drain.

Usually when a water heater fails, it is not a complete rush of water so if it ever did fail or a plumbing leak occurred within the room it would have a place to go.

Hope this helps!
 
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