basement studs


  #1  
Old 02-26-03, 01:10 PM
rose8878
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basement studs

Can someone help me out on installation of metal studs ? I am finishing my basement and have built all of the walls with wood. I am considering using metal studs for the wall around my gas hot water heater. I only need 8 studs and I know that I don't have to use metal but its just me. I don't know how to install them! I would continue to use a treated base plate. Are metal studs a different size than wood and do I need to worry about insulation size ?

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 02-27-03, 04:12 AM
B
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steel studs have the same dimensions..

Steel studs have the same dimensions as wood studs.
You will need c-channel tracks ant the top and bottom. The steel studs slip inside of these. Then you use a 7/16 fine thread drywall screw to attach the stud to the channel, one screw at the top and one at the bottom.


You can use the same insulation batts. Wider batts are available but not needed. Just stuff extra insulation in the stud cavity. I used spray adhesive on the flaps to hold the insulation in place until the drywall was up.

Use aviator tin snips to cut the studs to length.

It wouldn't hurt to use treated wood under the bottom c-channel. If your jurisdiction requires it for the wood studs, then use it under the steel studs. Then attach the c-hannel to it with 1-1/4 fine thread drywall screws. You'll need these same screws to attach the drywall.
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-03, 04:22 AM
B
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Wood 2x4 studs are 3-1/2" wide and metal studs are 3-5/8" wide; at least that's what US Gypsum and National Gypsum say. So the question is: does the 1/8" really matter in your case or are there other manufacturers with 3-1/2" metal studs?

Bruce
 
  #4  
Old 02-27-03, 05:35 AM
rose8878
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Thanks for the reply......Do I stud corners with metal studs the same way as with wood ??
 
  #5  
Old 02-27-03, 10:43 AM
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Yes
 
  #6  
Old 02-28-03, 04:56 AM
tmarcoux
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I have another opinion on the installation of steel vs. wood.

In general, the installation is the same. But there are differences that make a long term difference; especially on the inside corners.

It's difficult to explain in words, but I will try my best. On an interior corner, with wood, you set a corner nailer on both incoming walls and hang the drywall to the corner. Because of the steel's lateral weakness (although it firms up when drywalled), that same corner will not be nearly a solid. After drywall is hung, you will be able to press on the wall and see visible movement in the corner.

Alternatively, when I frame the corner with steel, I make one wall a "base" and the other the "connector". When framing the connector, I leave it 1/2" shy of touching the base wall, with the last steel stud installed, but not connected (floating). The base wall is framed as traditional wood is done.

Why all this? When I hang the drywall, I hang the base wall first, extending the drywall past where the finished corner will be, through the 1/2" gap, almost to the other end of the wall. The drywall gets screwed into the furthestmost stud, towards the exterior wall (hence, beyond the finished corner). It creates a solid base, less resistant to moving. Next, I screw the "floater" on the connector wall to the drywall on the base (and hopefully into the stud, but not necessary). Then hang the drywall on the connector wall flush to create the finished corner. I promise that this corner is significantly superior to a traditional wood corner in a steel environment.

Sorry if this is confusing. A picture would work much better.

One last comment on your question of using a 2x4 base plate. I always use one because code will sometimes dictate it, it's a good idea anyway, and most important, nailing the wood to the floor then screwing the track to the wood allows you more lattitude to move the bottom track to gain plumb. If the bottom track is nailed to the floor, your only correction can be done from above.
 
  #7  
Old 02-28-03, 05:04 AM
rose8878
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Thanks for the input. I think that you explained your corner system well...at least I understand what you do and it makes sense.
 
 

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