framed wall support strip?


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Old 04-15-03, 09:08 AM
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Question framed wall support strip?

The builder installed some kind of metal strips on all the framed walls...they cut a n indent in the wood and nailed them to the 2X4's. They look like they are some kind of support strip to keep the 2X4's from bowing.

I think they will make hanging drywall a little difficult. Should I remove them and install 2X4 blocks inbetween the studs or keep them?
 
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Old 04-15-03, 02:46 PM
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bverdon,

Do not remove them! Horizontal blocking is not a substitute for this bracing. Metal Kerf type bracing is required when Foam sheathing is to be applied.

I assume your Builder is going to be installing Foam Sheathing to your exterior walls. If you're building a foam-sheathed home: metal strap braces and 1"x4" let-in braces is to prevent racking as what structural sheathing would be providing.

Plywood, oriented strandboard and waferboard are staples of light-frame construction. Wall bracing is not required when these structural sheathings are used. But remove structural skin from the skeleton of the frame kettle and you create a vastly different animal.

For example, walls sheathed exclusively with rigid foam panels need lateral bracing to resist wind loads. To reinforce the corners, diagonal bracing in metal, Kerf type wind bracing provides the ability for the walls to sustain the resistance of the wind force.

Builders may turn to let-in and metal braces as substitutes for structural sheathing when exterior rigid foam is used. Use of these bracing systems probably will not result in catastrophic failure. I do know that they may provide a steady diet of callbacks related to cracked plaster and windows that bind when opened. This is usally in areas where high winds are present and this can cause some problems.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 04-15-03, 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by Doug Aleshire
bverdon,

Do not remove them! Horizontal blocking is not a substitute for this bracing. Metal Kerf type bracing is required when Foam sheathing is to be applied.

I assume your Builder is going to be installing Foam Sheathing to your exterior walls. If you're building a foam-sheathed home: metal strap braces and 1"x4" let-in braces is to prevent racking as what structural sheathing would be providing.

Plywood, oriented strandboard and waferboard are staples of light-frame construction. Wall bracing is not required when these structural sheathings are used. But remove structural skin from the skeleton of the frame kettle and you create a vastly different animal.

For example, walls sheathed exclusively with rigid foam panels need lateral bracing to resist wind loads. To reinforce the corners, diagonal bracing in metal, Kerf type wind bracing provides the ability for the walls to sustain the resistance of the wind force.

Builders may turn to let-in and metal braces as substitutes for structural sheathing when exterior rigid foam is used. Use of these bracing systems probably will not result in catastrophic failure. I do know that they may provide a steady diet of callbacks related to cracked plaster and windows that bind when opened. This is usally in areas where high winds are present and this can cause some problems.

Hope this helps!
Thanks for the info Doug. My builder installed them on all the interior walls as well...I was just wondering why? Will I have any issues when I start hanging the drywall? Also...dio I need to install them on any new interior wall I build? I assume the foam sheathing is the real light stuff made of foam?

Thanks
 
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Old 04-15-03, 05:16 PM
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bverdon,

I'm surprised that they are installed on the interior wall too. Normally just the exterior corners are needed.

What is going to be used for wall insulation?

These won't interfere with drywall installation at all. There is no need nor requirement to place these metal braces on interior walls.

Foam sheathing is made of foam and you may have foil faced one side. Great for added insulation but has no streagth required for a sound structure.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 04-15-03, 07:12 PM
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Originally posted by Doug Aleshire
bverdon,

I'm surprised that they are installed on the interior wall too. Normally just the exterior corners are needed.

What is going to be used for wall insulation?

These won't interfere with drywall installation at all. There is no need nor requirement to place these metal braces on interior walls.

Foam sheathing is made of foam and you may have foil faced one side. Great for added insulation but has no streagth required for a sound structure.

Hope this helps!

I plan on using R-13 paper pack fiberglass on all the exterior walls....and some of the interior walls too. The county inspector missed having this kind of support in one of the corners of my basement...my inspector found it and I had the builder install it in that corner. Glad that was discovered before I closed up the wall.
 
 

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