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drywall getting wet in basement due to faulty sub-pump

drywall getting wet in basement due to faulty sub-pump


  #1  
Old 07-02-03, 05:30 PM
ecd123
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drywall getting wet in basement due to faulty sub-pump

I was finishing off a room in my basement I was doing trim and baseboard when this nightmare occurred. My sub-pump went in my basement and I had about 1 inch of water which I ran to the Home Depot and got a subpump and installed it within about a half hour. I used the pressure treated wood for the base of the wall so that should be fine But about 1 inch of the sheetrock got wet I quickly sucked all water out of basement and began to use a heat gun to dry the sheetrock to prevent it from molding and becoming toxic. I also testing for mold and it came back negative. Now before I get carpet, I would greatly appreciate any information on this matter whether it is safe or should I cut the base of the sheetrock out and replace it? Also, what do you think is the best way to go as far as subpumps get the two where one backs up the other and runs off a battery if power goes out? I hope to get some informative responses thanks ecd123
 
  #2  
Old 07-02-03, 07:32 PM
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ecd123,

If only an ince of water was in the absement and you quickly cleaned up everything and have fans going, the issue of cutting out the bottom may not be necessary. If you have dehumidifier this along with fans should be fine. Once things dry out, take an assessment then.

I guess if I were you I would not even consider a "Battery Back Up Sump Pump". Reason you may be asking is that it is not a guarantee that they will work when needed. As with most homeowners, we don't always check on things when we are supposed to. If it is out of sight, it definitely is out of mind!

I would recommend a good water powered sump pump backup like the Guardian, normally available through a plumber since they don't sell these over the counter through a plumbing distributor. They are not cheap, runs about $450 - $500 but this must be plumbed into a 3/4" line, and installed before going to any fixtures or tees. Labor on these can be $350 plus. The water pressure from the city powers this and does quite well - for every gallon of water used, 2 gallons is pumped out. It requires a 1 1/2 PVC pipe for discharge.It does come with a Backflow Preventer for the water inlet pipe but you will need to get a check valve for the 1 1/2" PVC line. It can lift the water up to 15 feet at 407 GPH. At 10' it is 580 GPH. It does have an adjustable float that is placed adjusted just above your existing sump pump. So when the power does come back on, your's would kick on and the back up automatically shuts down. Simple and very effective.

I am an advocate of this and have installed many, especially after a client calls and says their battery back up failed. What usually happens is the batteries fail or if wired in on its own circuit, the power goes out, breaker trips and it doesn't recharge. Other cases, the batteries have just failed. If you don't check on it, you will have problems. At least the water pressure is more of a guarantee than the battery backups. I stress this is just used as an Emergency Back Up.

Hope this helps!
 
  #3  
Old 07-02-03, 08:13 PM
ecd123
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Thanks so much for your thoughts on this matter take care and have a nice holiday
 
  #4  
Old 07-03-03, 07:33 AM
J
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Drywall manufacturers say that drywall that gets wet with water that does not contain organic material does not need to be replaced.
 
  #5  
Old 07-03-03, 02:34 PM
ecd123
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Learn something new everyday. thanks for the responses they were certainly helpful.
 
  #6  
Old 07-06-03, 08:06 PM
swegman
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I have a question. I have an ejector pump for my basement (the rest of the house is gravity fed). I am parinoid about the unit failing, and the storage tank over-flowing. Would it be possible to use a water powered sump pump to evacuate the liquid waste should the ejector pump fail? I understand that it would not be able to pump out solids, but if it could get rid of tghe liquid, that would be an adequate backup.

Steve
 
  #7  
Old 07-06-03, 08:28 PM
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Steve,

The Guardian is used for pumping out water only. This works great for water infiltration issues to prevent damage to the lower level when power outages occur and you need to drain the sump basket.

The main issue that I would have is how to ensure that solids would stay down and the water waste, if you will would be pumped out. If I am not mistaken, your ejector pump and storage is a Self-Contained unit, for obvious reasons. The storage tank is vented to the roof or tied into a waste stack, I assume. I am assuming that if you ever had a power failure, someone will know it. Thus the use of the upstairs bath would be used - everyone would be off limits to the downstairs bath until power returns.

For what you are asking, I would think that this would not be required or needed.

If you'd like, post this question in the Repair Forum under Plumbing for better expert advice as they are real good over there!

Hope this helps!
 
 

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