Painting basement floor?


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Old 11-30-03, 05:27 PM
RunMonkeyRun
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Painting basement floor?

Hi their, wright now my house is only in the foundation stage but I would like to paint the basement floor once I move in. Now it being brand new would I have to use and acid cleaner before I paint or can I just pressure wash it with water? also I was told by the gentlman at home depot that it is recommend to wait a year before I do this, but as it being a new development I am trying to reduce the dust in the house. Then I am not sure if I should put water base or oil? any info much appreciated. thanks
 
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Old 11-30-03, 05:42 PM
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RunMonkeyRun,

For new concrete floors, old uncoated floors or the complete removal of existing coatings, proper surface preparation is your most important process.

New concrete must be tested for curing compounds that are frequently applied to new concrete and can interfere with coating adhesion.

You must test for moisture in the concrete. If moisture is present, the floor should not be coated until the source of the moisture is determined and eliminated. This is critical.

Depending on when you do want to paint the floor, it may be impossible due because it will contain a high moisture content which will effect the adhesion and durability. It may be at least a year before I would recommend painting. This is depending on what is used as a sealer within the foundation. Some sealers will also cause problems in adhesion and this should be addressed. Get name of any sealers that will be used as the paint that you choose may not be compatible.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 11-30-03, 05:51 PM
RunMonkeyRun
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Thumbs up

Well this is one step forward to know what the heck I am doing.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 06:02 PM
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RunMonkeyRun,

Hope it helped and by the way Thanks!
 
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Old 12-05-03, 12:15 PM
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Doug - what advice would you give for painting old concrete floors? Is there a recommended method for cleaning it first, or it soap and water ok? Any particular type of paint? I won't be finishing the basement, but I'd like a surface that will help keep the dust down and will be easy to clean in the future.

Thanks for your posts!
 
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Old 12-05-03, 06:38 PM
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Irishguy,

Well here are a couple of options to your question as long as we don't need to be concerned about color. Each can easily be done. I agree that all concrete lets off cement dust every time you sweep and walk on it.

Bear in mind that if at anytime you desire to use ceramic tile or self stick vinyl or glued down carpet, that the floor will require a process called etching. This chemical cleaning process cuts the sealers and prepares the concrete for sound adhesion.

Etching can be done for basements or garages by most do-it-yourselfers by first degreasing the surface with detergent and water. One method to use once this is done, is to mix 1 part muriatic acid to 3 parts water. Use gloves,long sleeve shirt and goggles as this will harm your skin. Ventilate well. Then rinse with clear water and let it dry.

The other method of etching is using Sulfamic acid which is in a powder. This is dissolved when poured into hot water. Much less dangerous to work with than the other acids as that of muriactic acid and the best choice. Mix one pound of Sulfamic Acid with 1 gallon of hot water to treat 300 square feet of concrete.

So if you want to etch it, then you can either apply the below sealers or apply epoxy paint which costs more than sealers but you have color options available.

1. An inexpensive approach is to use a pump up pressure weed sprayer. Buy some concrete sealer and apply a thin spray mist over your floor. Let this dry, ventilate accordingly.

2. For an easier maintainable floor as the sealers will wear out in time depending on what you are doing is to use a clear moisture cure Polyurethane product. The secret is to cut a standard product with about 5% thinner and let it soak into the floor. It will seal the floor making it easy to clean but again won't help the looks. The urethane should just soak into the floor, ensure that no puddles are on the surface. You may have to adjust the thinner to obtain the proper dilution. The fumes from the urethane may be a problem be sure to take precautions with proper ventilation.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 12-11-03, 11:45 AM
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Several weeks ago I found an epoxy product at Home Depot, and painted my garage with it. (Epoxy brand – comes in a two can kit) It wasn’t cheap, $79 for 2 gallons, but boy was I impressed. It painted on super easy, and looks great, and it sure looks like it is going to last for quite a while. They also had the Epoxy product for basement slabs that emulated that tile you used to see in schools. They have some “chip additive” in the system that you can use. I was very happy with this product. I think that I am going to use it for the kids new Rec-room I am finishing.


Will
 
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Old 12-11-03, 12:44 PM
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Will,

Thanks for the feedback. Let us now how it holds up through the winter. Not sure where you live but knowing would be helpful.

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-11-03, 01:06 PM
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Doug,

I sure will let you know how it survives the winter. I live in Northern Virginia, and the garage is actually going to be a non-heated workshop. No automobiles driving on the surface, but a lot foot traffic and “workshop” debris on it. It sure sweeps up nice after a project. I’ll let you know!

Will
 
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Old 12-17-03, 10:09 AM
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I have used a product called U Coat in a basement and on my front porch, and was impressed with the results. The moisture in basement flooring was a concern for me, and this product is moisture insensitive, I actually had to apply it to the floor while it was damp!(as per instructions). It used two coats of the epoxy paint to get the desired finish and says it will expand and contract with the concrete, making a permeable coating that resists hydrostatic pressure. Have had it down for six months, live in a suburb of Detroit, with snow and inclimate weather on the porch constantly, and have had no problems. I am satisfied. Of course the prep work was the most laborious part of the whole job, but this done right (as with all paint jobs) will assure the proper adhesion of the coating. Hope this helps you or gives you a new option. Check out their website. Happy Holidays!
 
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Old 12-21-03, 08:18 PM
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Will,

I used the same stuff for a unheated workshop on my basement concrete floor this past weekend. Like you said, once the floor was cleaned it was easy to paint and it looks great. 16 hours after I painted I moved heavy stuff on in, things slid like a charm. I'm thinking this will last a long time. It was a Rustoleum product.

N. Virginia. Sorry to hear that.

Bob
(from suburban MD ).
 
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Old 12-21-03, 08:22 PM
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Bob,

Was this an epoxy product or something else? How much was it and any approx sq. footage coverage numbers?
 
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Old 12-21-03, 08:31 PM
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Doug,

It was an epoxy product, 2 part that you mixed together. You are suppose to use all w/ in 5 hours. It covers 250 sq. ft. I had 150 sq. ft., letting the rest go.

My neighbors did this w/ two containers, it did cover 500 sq. ft. It runs around $39 per unit (covering 250 sq. ft.). Looks great! HD did have another epoxy 1 step epoxy product, but I went w/ the 2 part.

Happy holidays!!
 
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Old 12-21-03, 08:38 PM
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Bob,

Thanks for the feedback.

I am hearing that some like epoxy and others are going with staining routine. There are others out there but may I ask what prompted you or Will to go with the epoxy?
 
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Old 12-22-03, 06:32 AM
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Doug

My Garage slab is very old, over 50 years, and has some cracking in it. I wanted something that would actually have some substance to it, and not just change the color and seal the cement. The Epoxy filled the cracks very nicely.

Will
 
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Old 12-22-03, 06:35 AM
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Will,

Thanks for the info.

If you can, let everyone know how this holds up come spring. I assume you are parking your car in the garage?

Much salt use where you are at?

Thanks again!
 
 

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