Leveling a basement floor


  #1  
Old 01-12-04, 11:00 AM
chadt
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Leveling a basement floor

I have a fairly unlevel basement floor. I plan to put dricore down, but i dont want to have to buy 300 packages of levelers to keelp the whole floor level.

Is there a certain type of floor leveler that is like a light mixture that can be poured on the floor and then self level itself? All the stuff i find is a fairly thick and would have to be spread out. I though i had heard fo a product that could be poured onto the floor and levels out in seconds, then hardens in a few hours?

Any suggestions?

Thanks,
 
  #2  
Old 01-12-04, 12:26 PM
I
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What you are looking for is basically a self-leveler cement. you get it in bags, mix it with water and pour it on the floor.

It is mostly used by people in the carpet industry, so you can ask there.

I use Sika Products. They have several types of levelers, some expensive, some very cheep. I would prefer Sika Levelcm.
for a list of Sika suppliers see the below link:

http://www.sikaconstruction.com/con/con-dis.htm

check for other producers too and compare prices. You basically need a simple product, like for carpets.
 
  #3  
Old 01-12-04, 12:52 PM
Stacy
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Are you wanting to self level with a concrete type mixture or does it not matter to you? For instance, are you looking for a self leveler that can also be used as a finished surface floor? (Without the concrete look?).

Stacy
 
  #4  
Old 01-12-04, 02:01 PM
chadt
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All i am needing is something that will level out my current concrete floor. I will be placing Dri-Core 2x2's on top of then then carpeting. It doesn't have to be anything pretty, just something hard enough so the floor will stay level. It doesn't matter if the leveler is concrete or not, just something that will not fail over time.
 
  #5  
Old 01-12-04, 02:17 PM
I
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Cool, just use the self leveler cement. Get the cheepest kind you can find. it will hold for long.
 
  #6  
Old 01-26-04, 11:40 AM
B
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Floor Leveler

I recently used one of those self-leveling floor underlayment products. I can't remember the name, but I got it at Home Depot $25 for a 50# bag. Mixed it with a 1/2 inch drill with a paddle mixer in a 5 gal HD bucket. Got it to "pancake batter" consistency and just poured it into the corner that was about 1 - 1 1/2 in low. The next morning it was hard as a rock and smooth as glass. Couldn't have been easier. I could probably use another bag, but I'm gonna put luan plywood and then a carpet down on top of it, so a little unevenness won't matter. the rest of the basement is similarly uneven, this was just a particularly low area.

I would definitely recommend this stuff. Very simple to use. Wear a mask though when mixing. Good luck.
 
  #7  
Old 01-27-04, 06:05 PM
kannobe
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leveling a basement floor

I have read your thread with great interest, as I have just begun adding a basement bathroom. Unfortunately in the area I selected the floor slopes about1 1/2 inches from the outside wall to where the plumbing wall studs will be. The bath area is approx. 11' X 5 1/2' in size. I pictured a liquid cement mix of some sort, but did not see anything that fit that description at the home depot. I would expect to use 2 or 3 bags to achieve the level I want, mixing it with a wheel barrel into forms. the problem is, I was hoping that the mix was almost like water so I knew exactly how much to use right away and then I could always add more to achieve the right height. If I have to wait for it to settle, I might apply too much and then I'll never get the excess stuff off the floor. Finally my question. Which product did you use, and am I right, do you have to wait a long time for the product to settle in to the appropriate depth? I want to get this level so that I can tile the floor.........Any advice you could send my way would be appreciated, all those bags of quickcrete looked the same to me.
 
  #8  
Old 01-28-04, 02:46 AM
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Well, promotion is not allowed in the forum, but If all else fails in your search, look at the following link for a distributor near you, and buy a "Sika Levelcem". And , yes- its an easy job- water like fluid with no need to wait for anything to settle in. In fact- you have to pour it slowly so you dont pour too much. The material does not contract or changes after it dries, so what you see while pouring, is what you get at the end. http://www.sikaconstruction.com/con/con-dis.htm
 
  #9  
Old 01-28-04, 06:35 AM
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Floor Leveler

The stuff I used was called LEVELQUIK, I think. It was in the tiling section at the Home Depot. The instructions say that if you need to add more after pouring, not to wait too long. If it has cured for more than 4 hours, you just need to paint it with a latex primer to ensure proper bonding (HD also carries the primer). And it doesn't settle, it just flows to finds its own level.
 
  #10  
Old 01-28-04, 04:41 PM
kannobe
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re leveling concrete

Thanks, I'll look for it tomorrow. All the times that I have been in the Depot and I never thought to look in the tiling dept....
 
  #11  
Old 01-29-04, 08:23 AM
mdemott
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drain in basement

While we are on this line of questions...I have a drain in my basement, where the floor dips down in a room that I want to carpet and use. I am thinking about covering up the drain to protect it, and leveling the cement all around it. Does this idea seem reasonable, or does anyone else have a better solution?
 
  #12  
Old 01-30-04, 12:30 PM
B
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Something tells me that that drain is there for a reason...perhaps to drain something??? Covering it and leveling it doesn't sound like a very wise idea.
 
  #13  
Old 01-30-04, 01:41 PM
mdemott
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Actually, we have two drains within 10 ft of one another. We have one in our laundry room and one in this separate room. Our house has never had any problems with flooding/water in the basement. So, my dilemma is...should I cover this drain or not? It would be nice to actually use the second room for something useful...
 
  #14  
Old 02-03-04, 06:25 AM
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I hate to belabor this floor leveling issue, but I do have one question. In the room I'm building in the basement, there are low spots in the floor as much as 1/2". What I hope to do is use enough leveler to basically cover the entire floor. So, what do I do in the doorway? Do I need to put in some sort of "form" to keep the leveler from maybe running out into the rest of the basement in the event the floor slopes that way?
 
  #15  
Old 02-03-04, 07:08 AM
I
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Cant you cut the door a bit to make it fit ?
 
  #16  
Old 02-03-04, 07:33 AM
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Well yes, I can certainly cut the door to fit if the leveled floor turns out to be significantly higher. That wasn't the question.
 
  #17  
Old 02-03-04, 10:08 AM
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Yes, put in a form to prevent the self-leveler from flowing where you don't want it. I would make sure it is high enough so that the self-leveler doesn't flow over it.
 
  #18  
Old 02-03-04, 10:22 AM
M
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Great, thanks. A leveler sounds like the answer to my problem, but also like a big mess in the making if not done properly.
 
 

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