Fixing a cement basement floor


  #1  
Old 01-19-04, 01:19 PM
unique3's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Winnipeg, MB Canada
Posts: 188
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Unhappy Fixing a cement basement floor

I am in the starting stages of remodeling my basement of my house I just purchased in November.
I have almost completed removing the old walls and sub floor and in the process I have noticed that the cement is cracked and the center of the floor is higher then the outside.
The previous owners said they have never had a drop of water in their basement and there is nothing to suggest that there has been any.

Anyways I when I finish the floor I want to install a fake wood floating floor for the majority of the basement and ceramic tile for the remaining parts. I looked into putting a sub floor down again but the loss of head room is an issue.

Any ideas of how to fix the cracks and somewhat level the floors is apreciated. I have read about using the self leveling compounds but I think that the difference between the outside and the center would require to much compound so I just want to make the floor somewhat level so that the floors dont fell like they are sloping and so that the the finished floor doesn't crack

Would using a thin set cement and applying it myself be the best/most cost effective method or what are my other options
 
  #2  
Old 01-19-04, 02:09 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 2,999
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If you wuld tell us the difference in elevation, or how high the hump is, we can better answer your question. Different elevations, require different fixs.
 
  #3  
Old 01-19-04, 05:15 PM
unique3's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Winnipeg, MB Canada
Posts: 188
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Difference in height

I have not measured the difference yet because I dont have any tools to do it with, not even a level. Anyways the basement is 23 feet across the narrow way and 37 feet the long way, the floor slopes up slowly across the whole basement and then aprox 5 feet out from each wall in a corner the crack splits up a couple different directions and the cement slopes down towards the walls, the difference across the 5 feet from the peak to the walls is about 1" to 1 1/2"

I cant level out the entire basement to the height of the peak wihtout spending a fortune so I figure its probably easiest to level out the steep slope in the corner to the height of the peak and then leave the rest of the basement alone. That way the floating floor will be ok. It does have some tolerance to unevenness.

Also what product would you suggest to seal the cracks with. I have seen several different products but I have no idea which is the best.
 
  #4  
Old 01-20-04, 07:37 AM
unique3's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Winnipeg, MB Canada
Posts: 188
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
More info on the floor

I asked a friend of mine who has a house in this area and he says that the ground here is very rich clay (close to the red river in Winnipeg MB) and that almost all basements crack within the first couple years and heave and settle for a while but that after the first few years (my house is 40 years old) the floor stays relatively the same.
This worries me because in part of the basement I wanted to use ceramic tile and my friend said that if the floor shifts at all that the tile will crack. Is this true for the smallest movements or only for large shifts in the floor and should I consider a more flexible option like peal and stick, or lenolium tiles?
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-04, 10:05 AM
I
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Israel
Posts: 56
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Sounds true. Houses usualy moves in the first one or two years and than they settle down.

You can treat the cracks with a flexible material which will move with the floor, or you can treat it with special cement mortars but if the floor will move- the mortar will too.

How about breaking that slope and leveling your floor that way ?
Its more work- but will probably be best...
 
  #6  
Old 01-20-04, 09:28 PM
unique3's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Winnipeg, MB Canada
Posts: 188
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Non option

From what you said I understand that you mean breaking up the concrete on the slope and then leveling it out and pooring over that? Maybe I missunderstood what you meant. Anyways that is a lot more work and expense then I am willing to undertake. I am either going to level the floor out as best I can with topping cement or I am going to use drycore panels as a subfloor and forget the whole thing.

Actually I bought some flexable crack sealer and some topping cement and am going to start fixing it this weekend, I will post how it turns out.
 
  #7  
Old 01-21-04, 12:39 PM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 141
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If you want to do tile you can try using a Ditra membrane between the floor and the tile. It will absorb small movements to prevent cracking of the tile/grout and only adds about 1/8 - 1/4" to the height of the floor.

Ditra is a product of Schluter Systems.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: