Basement Framing & Ceiling


  #1  
Old 04-15-04, 05:44 PM
Godzilla2
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Question Basement Framing & Ceiling

Hi,

Just to be absolutely sure I'll be doing the work properly without redo upon inspection. I have a couple of questions regarding the framing of the top plate and drywall ceiling.

When applying for the permit from the township, I have sketched and approved the following framing of works to do:

TO-DO-LIST:

1)Since I plan to use drywall ceiling, 5/8" is required from our local township.

2)I was told that the drywall for the ceiling has to push all the way to the pressurized base of the lower plate(the existing plate that has joist on top of it, which right on top of the concrete).

3)I plan to cut the 4x8-5/8" drywall in 3 slices (16" each width) to mount perpendicular to and just right on(under) the joists.

4)I was told to nail or screw the top plate on the drywall mentioned #3 above. Both the top plate and the lower plate(treated wood) of the frame that I will be building will be about 9" away from the concret wall(just to stay away from a vertical pipe from the ground which about 4"diameter and is a few inches away from the concrete wall).

QUESTIONS:
1) On #4 above, is okay to have 9" + away from the wall?
2) On #4 above, is it right to have the drywall in between the joist and the top plate of the frame that I will be building?
3) Since the drywall has to be pushed against of the lower plate(mentioned in TO-DO-LIST # 2) to protect against fire from getting up to the first floor structral, how do you usually run electrical wires?

Question #2 is my real concern here regarding framing & drywall ceiling.

Question # 3 is to find the best and the safest way of running wire withou leaving any holes behind

Any suggestion and comments will be deeply appreciated.
Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 04-15-04, 09:34 PM
J
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1) 5/8" isn't requried very many places, but I guess you live in an area with very restrictive fire codes.

2) I assume that by "pressurized plate", you are referring to the sill plate that sits on top of your foundation. Running the drywall all the way to the sill implies that it is being used as a firestop.

3) You plan to cut this drywall into strips why? Perhaps it's the only way you can get it into your basement? With all those butt joints, it's going to be very hard to hide all the seams on your ceiling. You'll need to skim-coat the entire ceiling with drywall mud. Try to use bigger pieces of drywall if there is any possible way to get them down into the basement. Is a window available?

Question #1: Yes, certainly, as long as you don't mind the wasted space. Check local codes (which appear to be quite strict) to see what kind of horizontal firestops are required. You will likely be required to block off this 9" space (from floor to ceiling, from stud to foundation) about every ten horizontal feet.

Question #2: It's unusual, but okay. Seems your township wants it that way.

Question #3: If you need wiring in the ceiling, you're going to have to cut holes in that ceiling drywall to drop the cable down into the walls. Seal around the holes with fire-rated caulk. But this job is going to be very tricky, since you must put the cable in the ceiling before your drywall, you must drywall before you frame, and you must frame before you can put the cable in the walls. That leaves open the question of how much cable you leave hanging down from the ceiling. I think it best to minimize the cabling in the ceiling, and try to run as much of it through the walls as you can.

I must say that your plan would be considered bizarre in most areas. You might want to discuss with your inspector alternative ways of providing the required firestopping.
 
  #3  
Old 04-16-04, 09:45 AM
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Id Take this down to code again and go over it to just make sure thats just how they want it . Dont foget to put a block of R-19 insulation up there on the sill plate in each joist space all around the home there.

2) On #4 above, is it right to have the drywall in between the joist and the top plate of the frame that I will be building?
Ask code there . I dont see why not its not a bearing wall. If you are going to use wood instead of steel studs. I would build the wall on the floor. With the top plate near the outside wall. Raise this up first to the ceiling and tap the bottom plate over in place.

On #3 after the 16" drywall is there on the ceiling and you have the top plate up there then drill a hole through them for the electric wire to drop down to a box in the wall.then seal around the holes with fire-rated caulk.

ED
 
  #4  
Old 04-16-04, 06:59 PM
Godzilla2
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Thanks all. It's very helpful.

To John's comment:
The reason I have to cut the 4x8-5/8" drywall into 3 strips was to allow myself room to do work inside and on top of the ceiling area. It also allow the inspector to see clearly how and what works were done. The cutted 16" strips only will be used to build the frame around the whole basement. The rest of the ceiling will be 4x8-5/8" and shouldn't have any problem taking them down to the basement.

About the 9" wall away from the concrete wall. I could actually build the wall 1" away from it but when gets to the vertical pipe(about 3" to 4" diameter and about 5" away from the concrete wall), I just need to build the wall around it. Any other suggestion?

To Ed's comment:
About "I would build the wall on the floor. With the top plate near the outside wall. Raise this up first to the ceiling and tap the bottom plate over in place." Not sure I understand this....especially the first two parts, afterall this is my first home improvement project. Can you someone help me out here?


NEW QUESTION:
1) I was told by a friend that I can buy 4X6"-5/8" drywall instead of 4x8-5/8". Is this true?

Thanks again.
 
  #5  
Old 04-16-04, 10:20 PM
J
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Drywall is commonly available in 4x8, 4x9, 4x10, 4x12, 4x16, 4.5x8 and 4.5x12. I've never seen it in 4x6.
 
  #6  
Old 04-17-04, 10:33 AM
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To Ed's comment:About "I would build the wall on the floor. With the top plate near the outside wall. Raise this up first to the ceiling and tap the bottom plate over in place." Not sure I understand this....especially the first two parts, afterall this is my first home improvement project. Can you someone help me out here?
When you go to build a wall for a home. You take the top plate and bottom plate put them side by side and lay out where the studs go. Then spread them apart put the studs in and nail them then raise the wall up. Now here in the basement and with the fire stop drywall up there on the ceiling. Have the top plate by the basement wall when you build it. Raise that top plate up to the ceiling first. The bottom plate will come to the wall and all you have to do is tap it over to your line on the floor.
3)I plan to cut the 4x8-5/8" drywall in 3 slices (16" each width) to mount perpendicular to and just right on(under) the joists.
Here Id cut the 4X8-5/8" to 2'X 8' and put the cut side to the sill plate. This will give you a good tape edge out in the room to butt to the rest of the ceiling drywall when you put it up. Also you can reach over that to the top plate for and wires you have to pull down there in the wall.

ED
 
  #7  
Old 04-17-04, 07:15 PM
stooge
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6 footers

Zilla2, I'm not sure about 6 footers being available to the general public or your typical supply yard but they are made for NY (Manhattan) market for getting up high rise buildings in elevators. Maybe they're used in other city areas too, not sure.
 
 

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