Frame Ductwork for Drywall


  #1  
Old 05-06-04, 06:16 PM
doxansoph
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Frame Ductwork for Drywall

We have ductwork 57" wide by 21' long, which also includes the I-beam. The span has only a few openings above(1" wide between ducts) where a 2x4 could be braced in the middle. Headroom is only 82" so that is an issue. Can we use 2x4's turned on their side to span the 57" for 1/2 drywall without any support in the middle? If so, should they spaced 16" or closer together?

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 05-06-04, 07:29 PM
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doxansoph,

Since you have minimum ceiling height this might be an option. Why not look at page 19 of this PDF - flat ceiling Drywall suspension tracks?

This get's it up close and you can drywall, paint. It's fast and easy! It takes less room than 2x framing.

http://www.usg.com/expert_advice/pdf/Chapter_01.pdf

Main Track is approx $4.20 for a 12 ft pc.
4 ft tees are $1.45 each.
Wire hangers (don't know price)

Figure out your room based upon what you need and you'll find this a very inexpensive way to go. If you want to do only the duct work area, that is fine. Don't forget about the wire to hang all this!

This can be done by a novice and if you rent a laser level, this will make installation easy and fast.

I use these allot in basements with low headroom or even those with high ceilings to get around all the things that get in your way. Makes for a clean look - hang drywall and tape - Done! Faster than all the wood framing and costs are far cheaper in both labor and material. Also, this is not a HD item, contact a local drywall supplier or a good lumber yard. This is USG Drywall Grid System when you ask if they carry it.

The other issue is that 1/2" drywall should not be suspended over 16" O.C. unless you are going to pay for the drywall that can sustain this.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 05-07-04, 05:06 AM
doxansoph
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Thank you. It does help.

Are there different grades of 1/2 drywall? What thickness or grade is recommended for a 16 O.C. drywall ceiling?
 
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Old 05-07-04, 08:38 AM
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doxansoph,

This is open for debate but traditionally, REGULAR SHEETROCK, 1/2" for ceiling joists @ 16" O.C., 5/8" for ceiling joists @ 24" O.C. . I have seen 1/2" placed on ceilings where the spans are 24" O.C. but give it time, it will sag. especially when it becomes an insulated space and with poor ventilation, it is a disaster waiting to happen.

Drywall comes in different forms depending on application it is to be used. Walls and ceiling need to have the proper product for the application desired. Below is the various types that USG manufactures. All of these are to be used per manufacturer’s recommendations. Unfortunately, many are not used for the right purposes and many have problems.

Regular 1/4”, 3/8”, 1/2”

Ultracode 3/4”

Firecode 5/8”

Firecode C 1/2”, 5/8”

Foil-Back 3/8”, 1/2”, 5/8”

Water-Resistant 1/2” , 5/8”

Interior Ceiling Board - Sag Resistant 1/2”

Exterior Ceiling Board 1/2” , 5/8”

Vinyl Covered Panels 1/2” , 5/8”

Abuse Resistant 1/2” , 5/8”

Gypsum Sheathing 1/2” , 5/8”

To prevent objectionable sag in new gypsum panel ceilings, the weight of overlaid unsupported insulation should not exceed 1.3 psf for ˝” thick panels with frame spacing 24” o.c.; 2.2 psf for ˝” panels on 16”o.c. framing (or ˝” SHEETROCK Brand Interior Ceiling Panels—Sag-Resistant on 24” o.c. framing) and 5/8” panels 24” o.c.; 3/8” thick panels must not be overlaid with unsupported insulation. A vapor retarder should be installed in exterior ceilings, and the plenum or attic space should be properly vented.
During periods of cold or damp weather when an independent vapor retarder is installed on ceilings behind the gypsum board, it is important to install the ceiling insulation before or immediately after installing the ceiling board. Failure to follow this procedure may result in moisture condensation on the back side of the gypsum board, causing the board to sag.
Water-based textures, interior finishing materials and high ambient humidity conditions can produce sag in gypsum ceiling panels if adequate vapor and moisture control is not provided. The following precautions must be observed to minimize sagging of ceiling panels:
a) Where vapor retarder is required in cold weather conditions, the temperature of the gypsum ceiling panels

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 05-07-04, 08:44 AM
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doxansoph,

By the way, for all the details on drywall and it's applications, go to this link

http://www.usg.com/Product_Index/_pr...oducts&sp=true

and under the black background SEARCH bar, in the gray area, go to

Gypsum Panels

SHEETROCK® Brand Gypsum Coreboard
System Catalog (CLick this for full PDF details)

Hope this does it!
 
 

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