Sewage Injector Pump / Pit

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  #1  
Old 09-29-04, 09:15 PM
Mfrihp
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Sewage Injector Pump / Pit

Primary questions: Can a hole in a sump pit liner be fixed with out a complete replacement and without the area around the hole being dry? If my pit used for an injector pump for sewage is only 22 inches deep am I going to have problems? What kind of problems?

Background:

The basement in my house recently flooded during a heavy ran storm when the power went out. The house is six years old and Iíve lived there for 2 years. The poured concrete basement is unfinished but we plan to have it finished, including a bathroom, in January. I have a sump pit for drainage and a sump pit for sewage (plumbing for a bathroom is roughed in already). I plan to get a batter backup system for the drainage pit. When I inspected the sewage pit I noticed the following: the pit which is about 22 inches deep always has about 8 inches of water in it. When I set off the pump I noticed water shooting back into the pit from a small hole in the bottom side of the pit. Iíve been told there should not be a whole in the pit by two plumbers as well as the builder (who happens to be a neighbor). Both plumbers told me the pit should be 30 inches deep to work properly for sewage. Both plumbers said the only way to fix the hole was to replace the pit which meant breaking the concrete $$. I got one quote for 1,500. Common sense tells me if I plan to add a bathroom I need to fix the hole otherwise 1)the pump will be going off every flush (since the water level is only about 2 lower then whatís necessary to set off the pump 2) sewage could flow back out of the hole. If the pit really needs to be 30 inches deep then I have it replaced anyway. I was told the water source was likely just the water table since the bottom of the pits is about 12 below grade and my gutters drain away rain water away a good 6-10 feet. I live in the Midwest. Any answers or comments appreciated.
 
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Old 09-30-04, 09:20 AM
S
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Not sure I completely understand your situation with the sewage ejector pit, but I am putting one in my basement. I have broken up the floor and have the ejector pump kit ready to go. The pump/basin was $300 not including check valve and related fittings. My hole is more like 34" deep though.

Based on my experience so far, I know there is a small hole in the discharge pipe just above the pump inside the container to bleed off air bubbles. I also know the basin will always have some level of effluent in it. It does not pump everything out, but maintains the water level between two levels controlled by float switches.

Also, the basin and pump will be completely removable after installed. I will not have to break up concrete to remove it, just disconnect fittings, and lift.

Perhaps if you could explain the leakage situation a bit more clearly, I could compare that to mine. If the leak is causing sewage to get into the pit outside the basin, then that is not good. I would think you'll need to remove the basin, disconnect the pump, and then put the pump into the pit to pump out the sewage in the pit. Might need to dispose of some soil/gravel after that to freshen the pit

I would run a bunch of clean waste water through the whole mess first, though.

I have no doubt the whole repair could be done for well under $500 if I were to do it. Assuming you could reuse the pump, a new basin is like $150, if that. So, then it would be less than $200. But it could get a bit messy, so get some rubber gloves.

As for needing to break up concrete, I rented an electric jackhammer for a day and a half (Sun 3pm to Monday 8 am) for $60 which was more than enough time to trench for the rough-in plumbing for a toilet, bathtub/shower, lavatory and ejector pump/basin.

So, even adding that cost would seem to be well within my estimate.

Another thought just occurred to me - perhaps the fitting at the inlet to the basin is leaking. Might just need to tighten a clamp or replace that fitting, assuming you can get to it. But, I would still seriously consider finding a way to clean the pit if doable, even though that might be a lot of grunt work.
 
  #3  
Old 10-01-04, 12:24 PM
Mfrihp
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Sewage Injector pit

I'll try to explain better:
The plumbing for a bath including a pump was put in at time of construction so the owner could later add a bath without having to deal with busting up the concreate. But I don't have a bathroom yet. So the pit should have no water in it now.

There is a hole/rip/tear near the bottom of the liner (not on the discharge pipe) letting in water from the water table. Since I want to add a bathroom I need to decide whether I need to fix the hole. I thought there might be some kind of adhseive I could use even the though the hole will be wet or even under water.

Currently water stays about 2 inches below whats necessary to set off the pump. If I add a bath without fixing the hole the pump would probably go off after each flush and its possible sewage could flow back through the hole under the slap.

Also, I need to find out if the pit depth of 22 inches is going to be a problem. Plumbers have told me it will but I really don't understand why.

Thanks
 
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Old 10-04-04, 08:26 AM
S
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OK, now I am not sure about the "liner". I have a basin, about the size of a plastic trash barrel. There is no liner in the pit. I will be adding gravel at the bottom and on the sides. There is no possible way anything can get out of the basin except through the discharge pipe or if the fitting were to leak. This is the inlet fitting about 1/3 of the way down from the top of the basin.

If you plan to add a bath including toilet, I would seriously consider going to a basin approach. Without seeing your setup, hard for me to imagine how it could hold up for raw sewage. Wouldn't you have odor probelms as well? What seals the pit?
 
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Old 10-05-04, 09:06 PM
Mfrihp
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By "liner" I meant basin. I've had two plumbers tell me there shouldn't be a hole there and it should be fixed and the only way to fix a hole in a basin is to replace it.
 
  #6  
Old 10-06-04, 06:15 AM
S
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I think a new basin is fairly cheap. That is what I would do. I cannot imagine the trouble of pulling the existing one, cleaning it and the pit, dissassembling it, patching it, then reassembling and reinstalling only to have it leak again down the line. For that much work, just fix it one time and sleep peacefully.
 
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