Seal tile floor

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Old 11-18-04, 01:45 PM
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Seal tile floor

I have a similar situation to Levelling over old tile:
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=187676

Bought my house last June and am "refinishing" my basement and want to seal the floor. It had foamback carpet glued to some type of floor tiles - don't think it's ceramic or vinyl - 12 X 12, thin, but will break if you bend it. I am worried it may have asbestos since the house was built in 65 so don't want to tear it up (room's also about 13' X 30' which is the main reason). I got the carpet up and discovered some mold spots on some tiles. I believe I currently don't have a water problem - have redone outside walk, graded yard, sealing walls, no water since I've been here, etc. and wondered what would be the best way to proceed. A small area of tiles were loose so have broken them up and have an occasional corner missing here and there. Was going to use a leveling compound. After that, do I strip and seal the tiles as the menard's kid suggested. Do I spray bleach mixture and scrub all the tiles and then seal? Can I just paint something on and forget about it? My contractor uncle said to use a "bioseal" and then waterproofing sealer. Not sure what to do, what kind of sealer I need, etc. I don't plan on covering the entire room with a leveler compound. I will be putting carpet - probably rubberback - down and don't want it contacting what's there currently.

Thanks for any suggestions.
 
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Old 12-05-04, 04:01 PM
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Nobody has any suggestions?
 
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Old 12-06-04, 08:06 AM
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Some states allow the removal of asbestos tiles by a homeowner. If yours does, I would. But that's just my opinion. If not, probably you can use a leleing product and carpet over. Asbestos is stable unless it becomes airborne by breaking up/ sanding tiles. You should be fine to carpet over. But I'd consider an indorr/outdoor carpet if there's a history of water problems. They don't all look like astroturf anymore.
 
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Old 12-06-04, 08:18 AM
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Thanks for the help. Did you mean leveling product or is leleing something different? I have broken up a few loose tiles, but for the most part, it would be chipping away at the corners and breaking off a quarter-sized piece at a time. Thought that may cause insanity. That and the possible danger to my family, then having to seal the floor anyway, etc.

I did use a little bleach solution on a tile, it got the adhesive/fuzz a little loose, and used a screw driver and was able to scrape the adhesive and mold off the tile. Perhaps there is a chemical solution I could use with an ice scraper or brush that would do a quicker job? If I just clean off all the tiles I could probably just level the bad areas and carpet over, right? A lowes person suggested a porcelain outdoor paint that would be a kind of an enamel/rubber coating as another option.

I too hope the water problems are gone. The entire room's gutted so at least I'm starting from scratch. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-06-04, 08:41 AM
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No I'm spelling challenged i guess. It's leveling--like you planned.

Here is a site with several ideas to help remove tiles in one piece. It's only when you shatter the tiles that you create a health risk (and frankly even then not much in my opinion, all of the research showing hazards has been with people who worked with asbestos products regularly). This site is from Nebraska's department of health and human services

http://www.hhs.state.ne.us/enh/asbestos/floortile.htm

from that site:

Some of the methods for breaking the bond of the adhesive that holds the tile to the floor are as follows:

Flood the floor tile with water, (preferably warm), for a day or two, longer if required. Rags or pieces of burlap placed over the flooded area may be used to hold the water and to slow evaporation. Many times this breaks the bond or at least allows for an easier separation with a wide blade tool such as a carpenter saw.

Heat sources, such as an electric infra-red heater, a propane torch, weed burner, or blow torch, when used with a wide blade tool, will allow the tile to be scooped up and flipped over, like turning pancakes on a griddle. Make sure that the room where the work is performed is well ventilated to avoid the accumulation of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and other fumes and gases released from the wax on the floor tile as it is heated.

Extreme cold such as dry ice combined with a wide blade tool will also break the adhesive bond. The dry ice can be broken up, spread around on the floor so that the floor is covered, and then covered with an insulating blanket to reduce evaporation. Or the dry ice may be sliced into slabs and moved around on the floor and covered with an insulating blanket. Sliding the wide blade tool under the tile will pop the tile up when the dry ice has done its job.

The use of solvents suitable for indoor use may also be used. Do not use flammable solvents because of the spontaneous ignition and fire hazard. When solvents are used, another environmental hazard is created and proper disposal may be a problem.
 
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Old 12-07-04, 04:52 AM
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Seal tile floor

Try a google search, "cut-back adhesives".

There is a simple test to determine if what you have is a true cut-back. Pour hot water on a small area, if there is no reaction, its a true cut-back.
 
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Old 12-07-04, 05:40 AM
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Thanks for the info. I think I'm going to go the clean/seal existing tiles route, however. Just not sure what's the best way to do it.
 
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Old 12-07-04, 07:04 AM
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FYI, I am going to go ahead and put leveler over my old tile (I asked the original "sealing tile" question). From everything I have read and heard (talked to people at the EPA etc.) one should not try and remove asbestos tile by themself. And professional abatement can be pricey. Also, I have heard that asbestos tile was generally 9X9 so there is a good chance you do not have asbestos. In any case, I think you are wise to seal it and put new flooring over the top. Just remember its there in case you ever want to make additions to the room, i.e. add a bathroom, that involves disturbing the tile.

Good luck.
 
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