Window Framing

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Old 12-08-04, 04:58 AM
J
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Window Framing

My basement windows will be set in the foundation and the walls will be framed to allow an inch behind the studs, meaning the walls will be a good 10 inces in from the windows. This another one of those elements that reminds one that you're in a basement. How have folks framed around the windows? Are there any "tricks" to try to minimize the appearance of the setback?

TIA,

Joel
Bayside, NY
 
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Old 12-08-04, 05:11 AM
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cosmetic window

I have seen some people put a (another) window, flush with the inside with curtains over it, just for appearance sake.
just a thought!
 
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Old 12-08-04, 05:22 AM
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I used a very simple technique (simple minds, simple answers) that actually still looks pretty good three years down the road. I simply framed even with the cut in the concrete, then drywalled back in and butted up against the actual window. Bottom first, then sides, then top. Made them all a tight fit since I only 'attached' the drywall to the studs (maybe I could've used adhesive caulk to glue to the concrete sills) Then used a simple painters caulk (pretty sure its inside/outside) at the butt joint against the windows. I painted the window sills white, the windows were new and white also and it looks pretty good.
 
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Old 12-08-04, 06:38 AM
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Framing around basement window

Jim --

I agree with Joel. When I did this in my old house, I made the opening in the framing a little wider than the window on the sides and bottom to allow more light in. It just makes the angles harder to get tight as there won't be any straight cuts except against window and in the side flush with the framing. I nailed to the inside of the studs and used caulk and joint compund in the corners. Held up great (At least until we moved! ). Put up a small curtain and it changed the whole look of the room.

Problem in new basement...I don't think metal hopper-style window frames are wide enough to allow even 1/2" drywall on the sides without restricting the opening of the windows. Any suggestions short of replacing them?

Thanks,
Tom
 
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Old 12-08-04, 03:35 PM
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You could just frame it with plywood of your choice too.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2004-...hobasement.jpg
 
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Old 12-08-04, 07:07 PM
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Tlogan brought up a good point about 'standard' basement windows. I suppose you could just use 1/4" plywood or even luan and then practice your plastering technique with drywall compund?

I felt the aluminum frame windows in the basement looked crummy anyway. Even the simple vinyl framed sliders available at Lowes or Homedepot for $30-40 were better looking than what I had. I just decided that replacing them was worth the money - whatever I did would neve look very good if I kept the old ones.
 
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Old 12-09-04, 06:34 AM
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Yeah, I saw those replacement windows and that's what made me think about just replacing the original ones if I couldn't find a better way to finish them off. Luann might work but just seems like it would be more trouble than it's worth. The originals are single pane the replacements are double so more energy efficient to boot! I've only got five in the entire basement. They would probably pay for themselves. It sounmds like a drop in the bucket over the cost of the entire project.

Tlogan
 
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Old 12-09-04, 12:09 PM
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Replacing the Windows

For my project, there really is no option to keep the original windows. They are so rusted and leaky that it makes no sense. I just didn't like the idea of the deep offset between the wall and the window, which is very unlike all the windows on the other floors.

Thanks, all, for the advice,

Joel
Bayside, NY
 
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Old 12-10-04, 05:31 AM
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Since they are all going to be replaced anyway, can you have them set on the inside edge of the concrete, instead of the outside edge? Depending on the thickness of the concrete (or blocks) you might get them in another 6 inches or so. I'm probably going to call a pro to replace mine and it doesn't hurt to ask the installer. I'm guessing it would work as long you can be sure that the ledge will drain water away from the window. A little patching concrete would probably fix that for you. It's shouldn't take but about a quarter inch slope from the window to the outside edge. Hmmm...I think I have a plan!
 
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