Heated garage insulation

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Old 12-19-04, 07:09 PM
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Heated garage insulation

I am currently in the middle of heating my garage. I have insulated all walls with r-19 pink panther faced insulation. I also put plastic over that for extra barrier, then put drywall on. Waiting for warmth to mud and tape. The attic to this 2 stall garage has no insulation. I have a continuous soffit, so I plan on putting a baffle every third space to insure ventilation. I plan on spreading celluose insulation around with a rake or something. Do I need to put plastic down first for moisture barrier? Also, its currently about 10 degrees outside. Should I check into insulating the garage door? If so, is there something out there that is not gawdy looking? Last question. I haven't mud and taped the drywall. I do plan on it in the spring. Will I have a problem with moisture or anything while I heat the garage upon waiting for the nicer weather to do this? I also plan on painting after the mud and tape with an oil base paint for even more moisture barrier and heat containment. Does this sound like I'm going in the right direction?
 
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Old 12-20-04, 04:26 PM
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How much do you plan to heat the garage? Do you want to occasionally take the chill off when you are working on a car or are you turning it into living space?

Generally I would not go to the trouble of trying to create double and triple vapor barriers. The living space in your house probably only has the craft paper on the insulation for a vapor barrier.

If you have continuous soffit vents I would put the insulation dam up in every bay. There is no reason to insulate the soffit, it will save you insulation and imporve the airflow. It might be easier to roll out fiberglass batts in the attic. Generally the loose cellulose and fiberglass are blown in. Carrying bags up and spreading it with a rake may be more work.

Insulating the garage door will be a huge help in keeping the room warm. You can get rigid foam insualtion in 4'x8' sheets to insulate the door. Don't forget that the door probably has a joint horizontally every two feet. Most of the rigid insulation is pink, blue or some other un-pretty color. You can glue fabric or canvas to the insulation to make it a bit more durable and improve it's look. Make sure you use a glue that will not attack/dissolve the foam.

Moisture in your garage will depend on what you are doing in there and what you are using for heat. An unvented heater like a vent free gas stove or kerosene heater will put a lot of moisture in the air. Electric heat or a forced air system (traditional furnace style) will not put moisture in the room.
 
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Old 12-23-04, 12:56 PM
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Thank you very much for the reply. I have finished the heating install. It is a Cayenne 45k BTU by Advanced Distributor Products. I have put a probrammable stat on it. I maintain it at 50 from 8pm to 4am. Then it goes to 60 for about 2 hours. I have a 3 year old daughter that is sensitive to the cold and sub-zero temps are in the forecast. At 515am, it drops to 50 again. At 200pm, it goes back to 60 til 8pm and starts over again. I am, however, still playing with the programming of it all to zero it in to where I like it. I cannot program below 50 with the stat I have. And in order for my higher temps to be where I want them to be and when, I have to have a low programmed in in order for the stat to be used at all.
As far as the insulation, the R19 in the walls, was free from my parents addition they did a year ago. The ceiling is cellulose. This was also free from my wifes brother which works for an insulation co that he provided from extra he had at his house. Free is good. I have currently put in about a 1/3 of this and is at approx 15" deep. I still have some electric and some storage work to do before I finish off the insulation and finally install the attic ladder. I use plastic to seal off the hole for the attic ladder which seems to help tremendously. I am trying my best to hurry every chance I get, but with the holidays, time is very hard harnass. With just what I have done so far though, the temp seems to stay relatively good. Meaning the temps do not drop quickly like I thought they would after the heater has reached programmed temp. I am very happy.
Moisture is what I am waiting on now. Our van gets parked in there every night and snow melts all over the place and introduces moisture 24/7. I didnt plan on mud and tape til spring in which I will then paint with an oil base paint for some moisture protection for the drywall. Or do you think I should make this priority?
Anyway, please feel free to write back and let me know what you think. Criticism is very welcome. I really do not like learning the hard way. I don't think any of us do. So any help at all is well appreciated.
Thank you again,
sdietz
 
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Old 12-23-04, 12:59 PM
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Forget one thing,
My continuous soffits are now vented every other spot. I didn't catch the advice until I was done. I can still, however, do this on the side I haven't gotten to yet. I did stuff some unfaced batts cut to size in the area where the blown in stuff can get into my soffits. Hopefully I did this right since it was my first time. My brother-in-law was not around to ask after he gave me the insulation and baffles.
sdietz
 
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Old 12-23-04, 01:11 PM
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Wink

I didnt make out if you put a V/B up on the ceiling then the drywall Id say you should have. BUT BUT If you did get all of the insulation up there right now . Are the drywall we start to cup On you from moisture there on it, If you cant let the temp stay dont mud and tape now.

ED
 
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Old 12-23-04, 05:24 PM
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Attached or Detached Garage?

Is this an attached or a detached garage?

Where do you live?

Generally speaking plastic should NEVER be used as a vapor barrier for heated spaces because it prevents necessary vapor flow thru the walls and provides a surface upon which moisture will condense too readily, will pool downward to rot framing members, and encourage mold and mildew growth.

Vapor Barriers should go on the outside of the building envelope in warm humid climates and on the inside only in cold climates.

How you insulate and finish the walls depends on whether the garage is attached or detached.

Need more information about particulars to provide proper answers.
 
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Old 12-24-04, 12:28 PM
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I think you are over estimating the problem you will have with mosture. You can cause more problems by trying to vapor barrier the mess out of the room. It is good to let a certain amount of the vapor escape, otherwise it is trapped inside.

With the 50 to 60 degree temps in your garage you will have a reduced amount of evaporation from the snow & mud. A normal home has much less of a vapor barrier and with people breathing, cooking and bathing there is much more water in the air.

I would not even bother with the oil based paint as a vapor barrier. Just use plain water based home latex.
 
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Old 12-24-04, 08:26 PM
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Thank you all for the input. It has been very helpful. For the answer to Homebild, this is an attatched 2 stall. Approx. 24 x 24. There is only one vehicle that parks in there. I have got the heater set to go no lower than 50 degrees. It is currently Christmas Eve @ 1130pm. The temp outside is -1. This is northern Indiana. A lot of nasty weather up and down. We get a lot of lake affect weather from Lake Michigan. I wanted to use oil base paint because I was told by others I would have a terrible moisture problem from the melting snow and ice off of the vehicles. Which I do. There is constantly a puddle of water around the vehicle. As far as the ceiling, there is already some bowing of the existing drywall. I didn't want it to get worse. I plan on adding screws to help straighten them out as much as possible before I mud and tape.
 
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