Water in my basement

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  #1  
Old 01-10-05, 06:44 AM
Truett Harris
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Smile Water in my basement

Good morning!

I'll be brief with this one. We live in Louisville, KY.

On January the 5th I was awaken by my wife with a kiss and her saying, "Good morning honey and happy birthday! By the way, I was working out in the basement and I noticed some water on the floor. You better go check it out." What a birthday present!

Anyway, I found water seeping in where the floor meets the basement walls. This is the only place where water is coming from. All of the water drained out the drain as it is supposed to. Our house is 41 years old and does not have a sump pump. All of the gutters have 4" tubing attached and drain away from the house. The house sits on a plateau with the grade running away from the house. The floor has the usual surface cracks with no water coming in from them. The walls have some cracks as well (much bigger than the floor does) and no water came in there either.

After visiting with several neighbors and some folks at Lowes and Home Depot, the leading suggestion is to apply a sealant along the joint where the floor meets the basement walls. They say there is a sealant which bonds to the joint just like mortar. It is not an epoxy. I haven't checked it out yet as I want to make an educated decision.

Also, I have always painted my garage floors and I would like to do this in my basement with the floor and walls. Also, over the weekend, I pressure washed the entire basement and dried it to a "T" in order to prepare for the next steps, whatever they may be.

Please advise me as I am open to all suggestions!

Thanks for your kind attention to this matter!!!!!
Truett
 
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  #2  
Old 01-10-05, 06:53 AM
darren_1974
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See this post:

http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=195302

I think a sump pump might also cure your problem.They really aren't that hard to install. It also might be a good idea in your case to seal the joint from the floor to the foundation wall, but obviously you also have a high water table. The water table rises and falls with changing weather conditions too. Has a bunch of snow melted lately?
 
  #3  
Old 01-10-05, 07:06 AM
Truett Harris
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Darren,

There was 12" of snow on December 22nd followed by 6" of rain since December 30th. This past year the Louisville area was about 55% over it's average annual rainfall and we had 19" of rain in May (although the official report was 15") and we have never had this issue. The amount of rain we recieved over the 6 day period is nothing unusual as compared to the last years rain events. My inital thought is because the snow lasted for about 8 days and then the rains came this is the cause for the ground to become completely saturated. The Metropolitan Sewar District has set up pumps throughout Saint Matthews to eliminate water, which is causing them problems too.

Tell me more about the process I am thinking of and If you can add some commentary on sump pumps related to the process of how they work, how you install one and the approximate cost I would be greatly appreciative. For me, the cost is really not an issue. The issue is making the best educated decision.

Thanks again for your kind attention!

Truett
 
  #4  
Old 01-10-05, 07:35 AM
darren_1974
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Sounds like you know where the water came from

I installed my sump pump before the floor was poured. We dug a deep hole, and dropped in a premade, preforated plastic sump basket. We had to dig down maybe 3', or a bit more. My weeping tile drains into my sump pit, but thats not necesary iy your weeping tile isn't there. Backfill with rock, then fill around the top of the basket with quick cement level with the slab. As the water table rises, the sump pit will fill with water, and when high enough, will raise the float on the pump, turning it on. The water level will be reduced by at least 1' or more. There are actually several ways to do this, and alot depends on the type of material you find when you dig down. If it is very granular, you are in good shape. If it is clay, you might never get water in the sump pit.
 
  #5  
Old 01-10-05, 07:41 AM
darren_1974
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  #6  
Old 01-10-05, 07:41 AM
Truett Harris
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Darren,

Thanks for the input!

Have a great week!

Truett
 
  #7  
Old 01-12-05, 12:08 PM
R
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I would call someone to look at it first a get some opinion to see what they think like I don't know Permanent Solutions that way you get some good professional advice
 

Last edited by Rima Boutros; 01-12-05 at 12:33 PM.
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