Basement Subfloor Question(s)?

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-27-05, 10:08 AM
jgumber
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Basement Subfloor Question(s)?

I'm looking for expert advice on the subfloor. My basement is unfinished. I've done some tests and I don't appear to have any moisture problems. I was looking at using Delta FL with either T&G or OSB as the subfloor(eventually carpeted). I don't like the idea of a moldy carpet so I think I really want a subfloor. Opinons on this approach? Will it last? Is it spongy? Are there better approaches, I need to save as much headroom as possible and looking at the most cost effective approach.

Another question is the order the work should be done? Do you do the subfloor before the perimeter and interior walls and fasten the baseplates to the subfloor and to the concrete?? Or do you put up the perimeter walls and interior walls and then put the subfloor inbetween? I'm getting conflicting advice on the order, just looking for some clarification.

Any advice/help would be appreciated.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 01-28-05, 06:06 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Westbrook, ME
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Basement subfloor

I'm in the process of doing this myself, so I can't speak for the long-term results. I used Platon, same thing as Delta from what I could see. It went down easily enough. But a big word of warning, make sure your floor is flat! I wasn't careful enough, and now I'm dealing with a couple 1/2" "bumps" in the floor that are causing me enough grief to consider ripping it all out and starting over.

I read an interesting idea in Fine Homebuilding the other day. He put down 1" foam insulation (instead of the Delta), then laid the plywood directly on that. He didn't approve of using a vapor barrier under the floor or anywhere else for that matter. Not sure about that. But one idea I definitely liked was use two layers of plywood. Don't bother with tongue and groove. It was far more bother than it was worth in my opinion after cutting around all the barriers I had in my basement. But if you lay the membrane down. Then lay 1/2" plywood down on top of that. Secure it with tapcon screws to the concrete. Probably wouldn't need to do much, just enough to keep it all solid to the floor. And you don't want to pierce the membrane more than necessary. Keep 1/8" expansion gaps around each sheet. Then you lay 1/2" plywood down on top of that at right angles to the first sheets, overlapping the seams. Screw the second layer to the first one. This would make a nice solid subfloor with no shifting boards if your concrete floor isn't perfectly flat.

I already did 3/4" plywood on top of the Platon, but I like the layering approach enough, I'm going to pick up some 1/2" plywood tomorrow and add that on top to tighten it all up.

As far as order, I'd definitely put the floor down first, then build on top of that. With Delta or Platon, you can do this. With the sleeper approach, maybe it doesn't work as well. But this makes it so your floor goes all the way to the concrete walls (with room to breath at the edges), and you don't need to use pressure treated wood.

Just some ideas from someone in the same position.

Good luck!
-Sean
 
  #3  
Old 01-28-05, 06:33 AM
tick221
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by sfpc2770
I'm in the process of doing this myself, so I can't speak for the long-term results. I used Platon, same thing as Delta from what I could see. It went down easily enough. But a big word of warning, make sure your floor is flat! I wasn't careful enough, and now I'm dealing with a couple 1/2" "bumps" in the floor that are causing me enough grief to consider ripping it all out and starting over.

I read an interesting idea in Fine Homebuilding the other day. He put down 1" foam insulation (instead of the Delta), then laid the plywood directly on that. He didn't approve of using a vapor barrier under the floor or anywhere else for that matter. Not sure about that. But one idea I definitely liked was use two layers of plywood. Don't bother with tongue and groove. It was far more bother than it was worth in my opinion after cutting around all the barriers I had in my basement. But if you lay the membrane down. Then lay 1/2" plywood down on top of that. Secure it with tapcon screws to the concrete. Probably wouldn't need to do much, just enough to keep it all solid to the floor. And you don't want to pierce the membrane more than necessary. Keep 1/8" expansion gaps around each sheet. Then you lay 1/2" plywood down on top of that at right angles to the first sheets, overlapping the seams. Screw the second layer to the first one. This would make a nice solid subfloor with no shifting boards if your concrete floor isn't perfectly flat.

I already did 3/4" plywood on top of the Platon, but I like the layering approach enough, I'm going to pick up some 1/2" plywood tomorrow and add that on top to tighten it all up.

As far as order, I'd definitely put the floor down first, then build on top of that. With Delta or Platon, you can do this. With the sleeper approach, maybe it doesn't work as well. But this makes it so your floor goes all the way to the concrete walls (with room to breath at the edges), and you don't need to use pressure treated wood.

Just some ideas from someone in the same position.

Good luck!
-Sean


Mind if I ask where you ordered your Platon from? and also can you give me an approx. thickness of the membrane, I'm trying to determine how high to raise my rough door openings and this would help.

Thanks

Alec
 
  #4  
Old 01-28-05, 07:08 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Westbrook, ME
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I'll have to check when I get home tonight. Don't recall where I ordered the Platon. It was a concrete supplies online site. I'll have to measure it. I think it's about 1/4" thick. Just seems to me with the 3/4" plywood, I was looking at 1" thick for the floor.

I'll post later tonight with the info.
-Sean


Originally Posted by tick221
Mind if I ask where you ordered your Platon from? and also can you give me an approx. thickness of the membrane, I'm trying to determine how high to raise my rough door openings and this would help.

Thanks

Alec
 
  #5  
Old 01-28-05, 05:31 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Westbrook, ME
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Platon

OK, here's what I found. I ordered from www.dalaco.com. It was about $130 plus shipping for a 6'9" x 65' roll. The shipped it right out to me nice and fast.

According to the platon site www.systemplaton.com, looks like it's about 1/4" high. That seems right to me.

Enjoy,
-Sean
 
  #6  
Old 01-28-05, 07:01 PM
jgumber
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the advice Sean. Platon does look similiar to delta fl. The biggest difference I found is Delta states it can support up to 6000 lb/sq ft where the Platon only supports 1000 lb/sq. ft otherwise it seems like the same product but slightly cheaper.

I would really be interested with any info on long term usage of either product.

Thanks
 

Last edited by jgumber; 01-28-05 at 07:15 PM.
  #7  
Old 01-29-05, 10:55 AM
tick221
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally Posted by sfpc2770
OK, here's what I found. I ordered from www.dalaco.com. It was about $130 plus shipping for a 6'9" x 65' roll. The shipped it right out to me nice and fast.

According to the platon site www.systemplaton.com, looks like it's about 1/4" high. That seems right to me.

Enjoy,
-Sean
Thanks for the response, how bad did they nail you for shipping the roll, I need about 1000sq feet and just want to know what to expect

thanks again

Alec
 
  #8  
Old 01-29-05, 01:24 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Westbrook, ME
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Shipping

Hm, well I paid $166.49 total, so shipping must have been somewhere around $25-30 since there's tax somewhere in there as well. But that was shipping the 6'9" roll with UPS. If you go up in size to say the 8' long roll, shipping goes through the roof since UPS doesn't take that big a package. So you'd need to order a few of the smaller rolls if you didn't want to get hit too hard by shipping. If I had ordered the 8' roll, shipping jumped up to $111.83 by common carrier.

Just finished unloading 10 sheets of 1/2" plywood, two sheets of 3/4" plywood, two sheets of 3/4" MDF, three 2x12x16' boards for stair stringers, and several dozen board feet of poplar on my own from the rented Home Depot truck. Isn't home improvement fun?

Enjoy,
-Sean
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: