sump pump


  #1  
Old 01-31-05, 02:34 PM
stormy
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sump pump

Hi, I am new here.

I am living in Chicago. I just bought a first brand new house in north surburban. I found my sump pump works very often( almost every 30 minutes in the dry season). I can see the water keep coming into my house even in the dry season. one interesting thing is that if I disconnect the sump pump. the water will stop raising in the well when the water reach the incoming hose's lower edge. I let my builder to look at it and he said it is the underground water or water stream........ but my neigbor's house(my house is even in higher position) is dry.

Can someone give me some advices? Any solutions for this case? Thank you very much in advance
 
  #2  
Old 01-31-05, 04:24 PM
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stormy:
sounds like your sump pump may need an adjustment.
Is the builder willing to have a plumber look into this
for you? Sounds like it could be covered by your
warranty or at least a courtesy call would be nice.

BTW, I'm from Chi town too. Also, I had an active sump pump, but
I never bothered to investigate. Sounds like you
took it a step further. Good job.

-jasper
 
  #3  
Old 02-01-05, 07:21 AM
stormy
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Thank you for your email. the plumber rised the pump three weeks ago by adding a brick under the pump. but nothing change.
 
  #4  
Old 02-01-05, 10:30 AM
123456
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Just a long shot thought....but..... Where does your sump discharge to? I assume in the burbs it is going to the city storm drain, but if the pipe just outside the house is busted (or not installed tightly), it could be draining right back into the sump pit. Or if not attached to the stormdrain, is it discharging far away from the foundation?
Maybe not, just something to check.
 
  #5  
Old 02-01-05, 10:36 AM
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I agree with 123456,
you're getting quite a bit of water for some reason, and sounds like your sump pump is doing his job. Not sure what else I can recommend other than ensuring you're diverting as much water away from your house as possible, i.e. ensure proper grading, gutter downspouts, sump pump discharge. You may want to add extensions if necessary. I have a solid PVC pipe extending 10' from my sump pump discharge because the plastic flexible ones usually crack and leak. And the same for my gutter downspouts, I don't use the splashers anymore, I have 6' extensions on all those as well. But I imagine your builder and/or plumber may have looked at (or suggested) these things?

Anyway, sorry I can't be of much help. I'm not sure what else can be done to eliminate the problem, especially if its high water. In any case, its always a good idea to have a reliable backup sump pump. I just purchased one for my new house and my sump pump rarely runs, but I'm planning to finish my basement.

Hopefully, some of the experts will chime in. Good luck.

-jasper
 
  #6  
Old 02-15-05, 11:41 AM
weave
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you could also try a gravity based backup system. works like a toilet, when the water gets to high it triggers a float that flushes the water out. Good for if you ever lose power and your electric pump won't work.
 
  #7  
Old 02-26-05, 07:40 PM
lost_ring
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Water table?

It sounds to me like your sump pump is just fighting the water table. It seems like the water is raising only to the level that it wants to be at and no further. Like, all around your house it's at that level. When you suck a little bit out of your sump hole, you've just gotten rid of a very small amount of an endless supply. The way I understand (or maybe misunderstand?) water tables is that they follow the contour of the land to a certain extent. So your neighbor on lower ground may find the water table is just below his basement floor as well. So maybe you just need to raise your sump pump just above the level that the water reaches on a normal dry day and leave it there for the occasion when it gets higher with the rain or snowmelt.
 
  #8  
Old 02-28-05, 07:47 PM
mooregr
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Normal?

Hello,
I have a similar situation at my house. My sump pump runs a lot it will fill up the sump fairly quickly. but when it reaches the bottom of the inlet pipe it slows down. Also let me say that I have hooked up an additional sump pump and have pumped the water way out in the yard. Here is what I think is going on I think that you have quite a bit of water flowing in just like I do. When the water level is below the level of the inlet pipes pretty much all of the water that is flowing is going right into your sump and not hanging around your foundation and under yout floor. When the water level rises to the bottom of the inlet it has lots of other places to go! All under your foundation and floor!. If you raise your sump pump then it allows water to stay under your house. You will notice that onec the water level gets say half way up the inlet pipe there are thousands of gallons around your house. It would take a really long time to make the water level to rise. There have been a few times that my sump pump has failed. Once because we had power outage caused by a thunder storm (power was off for 16 hours). We got flooded byt about 12" of water. Since then I have installed a battery powered sump pump. that wait until the water gets higher that the other pump. The other time we got a small flood was when the switch that turns the pump on failed. Since your pump is active I would recommend a backup pump in case of emergencies. I would also lower the level of your sump pump so that you have a head start incase it fails you will have more time to fix the problem and less of a reservoir under your house. Hope it helps!
 
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Old 03-03-05, 05:56 PM
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Why did your contractor build your house on a stream? Water has amazing power and to think you can fight it's will is absurd. If your sump pump is running in the winter, which I am assuming most things are frozen in Chicago right now, then you are going to have a battle on your hands when the spring thaw comes around. Get a second pump in there and make sure the hose runs all the way to the street(storm sewer) for discharge. Although I don't understand how that hose is not frozen right now...
 
  #10  
Old 03-08-05, 01:50 PM
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sump pump

Anytime you dig a hole and put a house it you face the possiblity of living above a swimming pool that empties into your basement. You never know how the ground looked before building and what kind of soil there was.

It sound like your excavation or the grading somewhere on your property may have intercepted a very permeable soil layer that provides a source of ground water.

I had a house 20 feet above the street with a driveway steep enough to have my car slide down into the street in the winter when the warm tires melted the snow. I had clay soil and a water level about two feet above my basement floor. I found this out when I poked a hole into the block cores to investigate. I applied Thoroseal on the inside of the wall and kept the basement dry until we had a heavy rain and the water built up in the soil around my house. It then leaked about twice a year.

I put in perimeter drain tile in a continuous loop around my basement. The sump pump took care of the water except for a very big storm. I then put extensions on all my downspouts and eventually had a dry basement.

Perhaps you need two sump pumps and some time. The water level may eventually drop to a reasonable level
 
  #11  
Old 03-08-05, 04:40 PM
paul1532
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I also installed a battery backup pump. It has saved our basement on three seperate ocasions and had nothing to do with power failure. The float broke once, the pump was unplug etc... Addtional I put a sensoer to our home alarm so now if the alarm fails, I know for sure.
Welcome to the burbs.
 
 

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