Paneling on ceiling?

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Old 04-14-05, 11:22 AM
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Paneling on ceiling?

Our basement is relative humid (empty a dehum once a day). The previous owner had ceiling tiles that are now falling apart and drooping. I was going to replace them when I noticed that it is suggested that the area that they are installed has less then 70 percent humidity. I think the type they had is becoming a sponge to the moisture.

There are ferring strips on all the joists to hold the tiles and I thought that a light colored paneling on the ceiling would be good. The walls are a dard panel now.

Do you see any problems with putting a panel up on the ceiling. I have a brad nailer/compressor that uses 2" brads. Can I use this or do I need a bigger nailer (er, for this job)?

Pete
 
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Old 04-14-05, 06:28 PM
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The only problem I see with putting paneling on the ceiling is that because the panels are so thin it would be hard to keep it from sagging here and there. Other than that I guess it would be ok.
 
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Old 04-15-05, 05:13 AM
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Ferring strips are every 12". And I have a lot of brads. I was thinking of a brad every 12" every direction.

Pete
 
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Old 04-15-05, 07:18 AM
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Might want to use screws to put up the paneling just in case you need to access the pipes and wires in the joists. You could use the silver screw caps to give them a nice look.
 
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Old 04-15-05, 07:48 AM
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With the humidity that high down there. I think panel will sag also. Id just paint it all up in the joist there.

ED
 
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Old 04-15-05, 07:54 AM
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Forgot to mention that this is an unheated basement and there is insulation in between the joists (well most of them). Tough to paint that.

I considered a drop system but because of some exercise equipment (height), I can't go lower than where it is.

I saw a drop ceiling that hugged the joist but can't remember the name and have no idea how much it cost.

Suggestions are gladly accepted. I won't be able to follow everyone's suggestion and may use a combination of them but they are all accepted, so please help me out here.

Pete
 
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Old 04-15-05, 08:02 AM
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Forgot to mention that this is an unheated basement and there is insulation in between the joists (well most of them).
If insulation is up there is the paper side up to the floor above. It should be. Is the insulation dry when you feel it. could this humidity come from the floor above and not the basement in winter time??????????

ED
 
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Old 04-15-05, 08:20 AM
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I haven't felt the insulation but the little that I did see, it doesn't have facing on it. Looks like pink both sides. I will look closer tonight.

And it is not humid in the winter, just the summer. So I would think the humidity is definitely from the basement.

Would redoing the basement with insulation, paper side toward the floor above, help the humidity in the basement?

Pete
 
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Old 04-15-05, 09:28 AM
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Would redoing the basement with insulation, paper side toward the floor above, help the humidity in the basement?
For the winter for sure. Thats how it should be. But for the summer I cant say.
How are the gutters and down spouts on the home does it get the water away from the home?? Ground slope away from the home ok?

ED
 
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Old 04-15-05, 09:53 AM
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No visible signs of moisture present at this time. Even with several very heavy rains. It's just extremely humid during the summer. However, it is nice and cool, too. The dehum makes it tolerable but needs emptied every day.

There are no windows to open either. When we bought the house, radon was very high, the previous owner and I agreed to a radon mitigation system and that knocked the radon down. I wonder if it is possible to do something like that for the humidity?

Pete
 
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Old 04-15-05, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc
If insulation is up there is the paper side up to the floor above. It should be. Is the insulation dry when you feel it. could this humidity come from the floor above and not the basement in winter time??????????

ED
No, the insulation has the paper side facing down toward the basement floor. The insulation felt soft to the touch but was dry.

Should this be reversed?
 
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Old 04-16-05, 11:37 AM
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Its like what to say here. If there is no heat in the basment then its like out side in the winter. Then the paper should be to the room side or floor above here. Dont know what you have down there in the basement but have you tried and put down a 6mil poly on the floor and see if that cuts down on the humidity.


ED
 
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Old 04-16-05, 05:00 PM
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Ed,

There is carpet on the floor. Paneling on the wall with styrofoam behind it.
So should I take the insulation down and reverse it so that the paper is to the floor above?

Pete
 
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Old 04-17-05, 12:48 PM
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In cold climates, the vapor retarder faces the heated area(s) of the home. Humidity in home should be between 35-55% for occupancy. Measure with hygrometer (sold where they sell thermometers). Use dehumidifier to lower humidity.
 
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Old 05-05-05, 06:42 PM
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I recently purchased a grid system that mounts to the joists called ceilinglink. I haven't installed it yet though so I can't report how well it works.

Al Z
 
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Old 05-06-05, 03:35 PM
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Let's hope psal2 reports back on this DIY project so that it will help all of us in case we are ever confronted with the same challenge!

Some builders cut corners and fail to put vapor retarders beneath concrete. Thus, vapor emissions through concrete can be very high. Although concrete appears to be dry and there are no obvious moisture issues, vapor emissions through concrete can be very high. Installing a vapor retarder over concrete and updating floor covering may resolve most of your humidity issues.

As indicated, all gutters and downspouts should be clear and moving water away from structure. Downspouts should not have splash guards but be drained into pits or drains at least 10 feet from the structure. Soil around structure should be sloped to carry away excess water during rain away from structure.

If humidity is maintained between 35-55% (measure with hygrometer sold where they sell thermometers) and insulation has vapor retarder facing basement ceiling (heated area above) then there should be no problem installing wood panels or ceiling tiles. Note: high humidity can create swamp conditions that will make any ceiling covering sag.

It may not be very aesthetic to knock a hole in basement wall, if possible, and installing an air conditioner unit to provide circulation of air and reduce humidity may be an option. Installing electric baseboard heaters that can be turned on and off during times basement is used will provide heat in the area when in use.
 
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