Basement building procedures

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  #1  
Old 05-08-05, 05:06 AM
Mudball
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Basement building procedures

I just started digging a hole for our basement. Could someone tell me what steps I need to keep in mind that will effect the procedure of digging the hole ?
Or does someone know of a building procedure check list of steps to take when building a basement ?
Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 05-08-05, 12:08 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: South Dakota
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Basement

Boy, you need alot of information in a short area we have to answer. Try this. Go to your local building permet department. They usually have brochures showing all the steps. If you still need help come back and we will try to help you. You might ask specific questions, because those are easier to answer. Good Luck
 
  #3  
Old 05-08-05, 12:17 PM
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WITH Jack get some books and read up on it all. If you are digging. Call around for some one that does footings and wall for basements ask them for a bid and where they think best to put the dirt from the hole now. so trucks can get in.

Ed
 
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Old 05-08-05, 02:19 PM
Mudball
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Thank you both very much.
I know my question is general but there has to be something to consider when digging the hole ONLY.
Thanks for the one answer: "Make sure there is a place for the trucks to get in".
I already have most of the hole dug and I'm keeping an eye on the level of it as I go. I'm using a tractor so I cant go too fast. I'm building a basement house with a gabled roof and one end is open to the hillside. The house with be about 1/2 buried and then back filled a little higher for water drainage purposes.
I am making the hole 3' wider on each side more than house for enough room to back fill with gravel and also have enough room to sealer.
I'm just wanting ideas of things to consider in the near future that when digging the hole with effect the outcome...Like a way for trucks to get in.
Any others ???
Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 05-08-05, 03:05 PM
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On earth contact homes we lay a drain tile around the back and 2 sides of the home on the outside footing Then lay another drain tile inside down next to the footing along the back and go alone both sides under the footing and out on each side so you have good drain from out side and also inside under the floor.

ED
 
  #6  
Old 05-08-05, 07:44 PM
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Basement building procedures

Keep the interior and exterior drain line below the top of the footing or lower if possible.

To avoid placing the footings on fill where you put pipe in to tie the drain lines together, run 1 or 1-1/2 inch (no larger) diameter pvc pipe crossways through the footing every six feet or so. You can stuff newspapers into the pipe to keep the footing concrete out of the pipe. Tie the pipes to the footing rebar to prevent them from floating.

For extra insurance you can knock a notch in the bottom face shell of the first course of block and insert a piece of flexible 3/4 inch poly pipe to drain any water out of the cores and into the gravel around the larger drain pipe. Lay the block with face shell bedding and not ful mortar bedding. This is something extra the only real conscientious mason contractors and builders do. This is an example of what a DIYer can do for little extra cost (the extra pipe will cost less the a coat of Drylock or Thoroseal).

Dick
 
  #7  
Old 05-09-05, 04:02 PM
Mudball
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Thank you both for the ideas. I want to plan for good drainage for sure. Does it sound like a bad idea to pour the footer on washed gravel ? Any opinions on "form-a-drain" ?

Concretemasonry; I didn't want notch out a hole on the bottom layer because I thought I would use 12" block for the areas that would have backfill against them and fill those with concrete...bad idea ?
What do you mean by "lay the block with face shell bedding and not full mortar bedding" ?
 
  #8  
Old 05-09-05, 07:56 PM
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Basement building procedures

Notching the bottom of the face shell for additional drainage tbe would only apply to unreinforced block basement walls.

Your 12 inch reinforced wall will be more than adequate.

Face shell bedding refers to putting mortar on the longitudinal parts of the block on both the inside and outside of the wall. Full mortar bedding means putting mortar on the face shells and the cross ties (webs) also. Normally, the first layer or course of block is laid with full mortar bedding and the rest of the wall is laid with just face shell bedding. For the drainage application I mentioned the mortar on the cross webs can be omitted since the vertical load on a basement wall is very low (the block weigh more than the entire house).

12 inch walls are used for lateral load resistance and not vertical loads. If you had no lateral load, you could just use a 6 inch block. Masonry walls in the U.S. are horribly overdesigned for vertical loads.
 
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Old 05-13-05, 07:09 PM
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Thanks concretemasonry.
I would also like to ask how you would insulate the blocks. Most all the sites I've read has suggested that the best procedure is to insulate the outside of the walls with rigid foam board.
Would you consider filling the blocks with concrete or more insulation ?
Any thoughts ?
Thanks
 
  #10  
Old 05-13-05, 08:46 PM
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Basement building procedures

I would go with rigid insulation on the outside of the block wall. You will have to cover the exposed portion from UV rays or it will age prematurely. Use extruded polystyrene and do not use expanded polystyrene (bead board). The thickness is up to you. Since you are insulating between soil and the inside the amount of insulation is much, much less. The average soil temperature is about 55 degrees depending on the depth and loaction. You also don't have to worry about infiltration also. One or two inches is more than enough and any more is not cost effective.

After the wall is done parge it (plastered with a mortar mix) or apply Thoroseal for waterproofing. You can also apply a waterproofing membrane (sheet, roll-on or brush). The best waterproofing is the use of drain tile, granular backfill and proper grading.

There is a fairly good site that gives some solutions for basement moisture problems. Go to Google and search for "an overview of of solutions to basement moisture problems".
 
  #11  
Old 05-14-05, 05:45 AM
Mudball
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Thanks Concretemasonry. I will do just that. I think I want to seal the block then put foam board and then maybe parge it as you mentioned. I'm not sure of the exterior yet...brick ???
So would you leave the concrete blocks hollow ?
 
  #12  
Old 05-14-05, 04:22 PM
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Basement building procedures

I wouldn't bother with filling the block in your case if you are using rigid polystyrene. Block walls filled with concrete are no better than hollow block or solid concrete.

I you do want to fill the blocks, you could fill them with polystyrene beads (sold in bags), but not with vermiculite or perlite and never, ever with foam. All of these will increase the insulation level, but I do not think you would recover the cost.

Dick
 
  #13  
Old 05-21-05, 02:49 AM
Mudball
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Thanks Concretemasonry.
I talk to a guy earlier this week and I'm suppose to meet with him today. He is about 50+ years old and has alot of concrete experience. Ive heard from other here locally that he is very good. My point is that he can show me a lot and make suggestions on what to do and how to do it. I will more than likely just contract the work out to him. I realized that even more when I heard some of the terms you used when it comes to laying block. It sounds like you have a lot of experience with it as well. I was blind to think that there wouldn't be that much to just putting down and laying block myself. Thanks again and I'm sure I'll be back soon. Trying to work on this house and go to work every day and do other everyday things sure takes up all my time.
Thanks
 
  #14  
Old 06-01-05, 08:31 PM
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I'd dig it extra deep (one block deeper than normal) so if you decide to finish it, you won't bump your head on the ceiling.
 
  #15  
Old 06-03-05, 04:21 PM
Mudball
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Thanks BlackOnBlack.
I know it sounds crazy but this is going to be our one level living quarters.
I talk to a mason block builder a couple of days ago and I think he'll lead me in the right direction. Thanks for the suggestion though.
 
  #16  
Old 06-03-05, 06:31 PM
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Basement building procedures

I am in total agreement about the extra course of block. The minimal extra cost is well outweighed by the advantages.

I just bought a 25 year old townhouse with a 13 course walkout basement (full 8 inch high block also, not 7 5/8 inch high). It make a world of difference when it comes to finishing and options.

Dick
 
  #17  
Old 06-04-05, 08:58 AM
Mudball
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Thank you both so much for your concern. Your inputs are very important to me.
I couldn't agree more with your comments. I haven't dug the footers or set the septic yet but when I talk to the masonry guy I told him that the blocks had to be high enough to finish the interior for 8' high walls and still be enough room up above for heat/air duct work ect...Does this make sense ?
Thanks again. I need all the help I can get.
 
  #18  
Old 06-04-05, 03:50 PM
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WE do all basement walls at 10 ft pour now. So we have room. No more 8 ft pour.


ED
 
  #19  
Old 06-05-05, 06:25 AM
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Thanks Ed Imeduc.
A 10' block wall should be enough room for a 8' wall and still have enough room for the duct work...right ?
 
  #20  
Old 06-05-05, 01:13 PM
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Should work ok for you You lose 4" for the basement floor. All duct work is 8". So that lets you have 9 ft clear. We use a drop down ceiling for the basements so you can get back in to them and fix or move stuff around. Later on . And you will

ED
 
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