Attic Flooring for storage

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-22-05, 07:59 PM
BootHill
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Attic Flooring for storage

I am considering putting a flooring in the attic above our garage, but I'm not sure if the structure is sufficient to support it properly. I would use the area for storage of some small items and for our empty boxes.

The attic area has rafters and trusses; the layout is like a 'W' and it looks like they are all 2x4s. Would putting in a particleboard flooring and some lightweight things on them be too much weight?

Thanks in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-23-05, 06:18 AM
Family Guy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Brandon, MS
Posts: 1,070
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Can I piggyback with a similar question?

What type of boards should I put down to be sufficient for walking on? Should it be plywood vs. particle board, and should it be 3/4", 1" or what? Not for constant use, but of course I don't want to fall through for using the wrong thing. I'm thinking plywood would be a necessity, right?
 
  #3  
Old 08-23-05, 07:34 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,130
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Attic Flooring for storage

Normally trusses are not designed loads, such as storage, on the bottom chord. There may be a little "extra" in the design, but only and engineer or truss designer would know. You can't just look at it and an error could be disasterous if you have heavy roof loads (snow, extra layers of shingles, etc.).

The best way to find out is contact the original truss manufacturer if you know who it was. An alternate whould be to take measurements of the truss and go to another truss manufacturer or an engineer. Also, take a photos of the trusses and truss plates (usually steel plates that attach the top botm and diagonal members together) . The plates vary and the method of manufacturer can have an effect on the strength.

Your odds on getting a guarantee are low, but not impossible.

Dick
 
  #4  
Old 08-24-05, 09:35 AM
Family Guy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Brandon, MS
Posts: 1,070
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
For me, I'm just talking about light duty storage like everyone has (christmas decorations etc). Also, flooring is to help me access parts of the attic I need to be able to get to, like the attic fan I need to swap out.
 
  #5  
Old 08-25-05, 02:56 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Even 1/4" plywood flexing underfoot will be safer than 5/8" particle board. I would go with 1/4" ply *and no thicker* just so people aren't tempted to overload the loft.
 
  #6  
Old 08-25-05, 10:20 AM
Family Guy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Brandon, MS
Posts: 1,070
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
1/4" sounds pretty thin, is that strong enough to walk across to access parts of the attic? Not high traffic by any means, I rarely go up there, but I want to be able to stand on it to swap out/install my attic fans.
I'll keep to plywood though.
 
  #7  
Old 08-25-05, 11:05 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,210
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've walked on rotten old 1/4" fir ply that was supported every 24", in the course of roofing. It flexes a lot, but then again that's it's strength. If you only need to store light loads and creep through occasionally, good enough.

Solid underfoot just makes the floor *seem* stronger than it really is, as limited by the *framing*.

A low grade of 3/8" sheathing will be about as strong as 1/4" fir.
 
  #8  
Old 09-02-05, 05:37 PM
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: santa Rosa, California
Posts: 194
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
BootHill & Family Guy,

5/8" cdx or osb t&g is normally the minimum for a walking service. if it really is just light storage x-mas decorations, that kind of stuff I would be willing to go down to 1/2" 5 ply plywood.

It is as everyone warned the 2x4 ceiling joists are a little light and every time you walk on ceiling you take a chance on floor bounce which in turn creates nail pops at the ceiling gyp board.

I hope this helps.

Brian Garrison
general contractor/professional building designer
 
  #9  
Old 10-27-05, 09:24 AM
S
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 930
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I found a product called Attic Dek (available on Amazon.com). It's made of a hard plastic material and comes in sizes for 16" and 24" on center. It's interlocking, and attachs to the joists with wood screws.

It's grated so it's not as heavy as plywood and it enables you to walk and place light storage without compromising insulation underneath. It is a little pricey but good if you only plan to do a small area.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: