Basement Framing Basics

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Old 09-14-05, 01:52 PM
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Basement Framing Basics

1. Can I build the walls on the floor then raise them up? For walls that are perpendicular to the joists this looks like it won't be possible. In the process of raising the wall I would surely hit the back edge of the header 2x4 on the bottom of the joist. Any solutions to this?


2. I'm working in a basement with i-beam engineered wood joists. Can I use a nailer to attach the walls to these and not split the joists?

Thanks.

Jeff

P.S. I couldn't find a way to just search this basement forum. or else I would have searched for these answers.
 
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Old 09-14-05, 02:30 PM
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Build the walls one stick at a time... It's tough to raise a completed wall in a confined space (if not impossible).

A nailer will work just fine.....

Just finished a new basement remodel that justified a new compressor and nailer (honey, I really need it).. and had no issues with the joists splitting...
 
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Old 09-14-05, 02:55 PM
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Building them one stick at a time was actually how I did it with my basement http://www.supraman.org/gallery/album04 . But now I'm doing my father-in-law's basement and I was thinking there might be a quicker way, sadly not .

So do you just use a plumb to line up the header and the footer? Sounds a little too inacurate, and I don't have an 8' level, maybe I should invest in one?

I just used the same justification menthod to get my new nailer and compressor .

To attach the header board to the i-beam wood joists won't split that bottom piece of wood?
 
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Old 09-14-05, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by supraman215
Building them one stick at a time was actually how I did it with my basement http://www.supraman.org/gallery/album04 . But now I'm doing my father-in-law's basement and I was thinking there might be a quicker way, sadly not .

So do you just use a plumb to line up the header and the footer? Sounds a little too inacurate, and I don't have an 8' level, maybe I should invest in one?

I just used the same justification menthod to get my new nailer and compressor .

To attach the header board to the i-beam wood joists won't split that bottom piece of wood?
Plumb line works great. One end, then the other, and a chalk line to set your header/footers.

Didn't split a single joist during my project..... (Gawd, I love that nailer).............
 
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Old 09-15-05, 10:28 AM
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Most people around here build them on the floor and raise them up. The codes here require P/T lumber for anything in direct contact with the concrete, so builders will attach this piece directly to the concrete and then set the pre-framed wall on top of it. Since the wall is shorter it can be stood up and slid into place - the back edge doesn't hit in this case.

Don't know if it is better or faster, just a different method to consider.
 
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Old 09-15-05, 12:10 PM
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Same code requirements here... probably everywhere.... not to mention I have to "float" my walls 2 inches off the base plate.

With my "floating wall" , I could have raised the entire section... However, ceiling joists tend to get in the way if you're using them for your top plate....
 
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Old 09-16-05, 06:10 AM
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I built all my walls on the floor and raised them up. It is so much easier then building them one stud at a time and so much easier to get it plumb. You lay out the studs, bottom and top plate on the floor and then top nail the plates into the studs. It is so much stronger than toe nailing.

I screwed the top plate into the bottom of the joists with no splitting issues.

The one thing I don't like about PT lumber is that it is still wood in contact with concrete. Wood rots eventually, no matter what kind it is. The code in my parts allow us to wrap the bottom plate in 6 mil poly. This virtually guarrantees you 100 years without an issue as plastic does not deteriorate easily.
 
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Old 09-16-05, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by em69
I built all my walls on the floor and raised them up. It is so much easier then building them one stud at a time and so much easier to get it plumb. You lay out the studs, bottom and top plate on the floor and then top nail the plates into the studs. It is so much stronger than toe nailing.

I screwed the top plate into the bottom of the joists with no splitting issues.

The one thing I don't like about PT lumber is that it is still wood in contact with concrete. Wood rots eventually, no matter what kind it is. The code in my parts allow us to wrap the bottom plate in 6 mil poly. This virtually guarrantees you 100 years without an issue as plastic does not deteriorate easily.
The plastic is not a bad idea... as long as you leave enough open for moisture to disperse.... Nothing quite like bathing PT wood in moisture to ruin your day - not to mention your remodel
 
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Old 09-16-05, 07:45 AM
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Once you built the wall on the floor and just before raising it, staple the poly to the studs on either side forming a "U" shape. I like to bring the poly up the studs at least 6 inches so that when you install your vapour barrier after insulating, you can seal it to the poly on your base plate. I prefer using vapour barrier tape (it's red) to make this seal...it easier than acoustical caulk.
 
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Old 09-17-05, 08:23 AM
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8' level

Supraman, I hand picked the truest 2" x 4" x 8'er I could find, then hold my 2' level againt it for plumbing longer spans. It works, and it's a little cheaper than buying an 8' level
 
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Old 09-17-05, 02:15 PM
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Remember these walls aren't going to be supporting the joists, build them a half inch short on the floor with PT as the bottom plate. Mark your floor 4 1/2 inches out from the concrete basement wall, raise the wall, line it up on the floor, nail it to the floor with one of those .22 caliber jobbies and then shim the top, plumb it (I used a 4 foot level) and screw it into the joists--you don't have to hit every joist either, this wall is only there to hold up your drywall, it's not going to take any load more than a door. If you're concerned about putting the PT direct on the concrete (I wasn't, but I have a very dry basement) get some of that thin foam designed for that purpose that they use under sill plates.
 
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Old 09-21-05, 11:12 AM
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I agree with caleyg, only I put some shims in between to hold things in place while nailing the top plate to the joists above.
 
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Old 09-24-05, 12:06 PM
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Hey, guys. I suppose this is really a stupid question, but what is a "PT" you guys keep on referring? I tried to look it up on Google w/o success.
Thx
 
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Old 09-24-05, 12:10 PM
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Pressure treated wood.... a tiny bit more water resistant/bug resistant/expensive than plain ole lumber.
 
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Old 09-26-05, 06:44 AM
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WOW some REALLY great ideas

1. As for the rotting of any kind of wood under water conditions no matter what that's definately true. But since we're not talking about having this PT lumber outside in the elements, and with any luck it will NEVER see water i'd say you'd get 100 years without the 6mil around it.

2. em69 didn't you have trouble raising them when they were completely built?

3. Blizzard: What a great idea! You have just saved me a HUGE ammount of time. I believe this is the best method I mean you're using a little extra wood but at $0.15 a foot for plain 2x4's it's worth it!

I don't mean to sound selfish but I just hope prices of wood don't get too out of hand from the storms in the south. People should definately be rebuilding their houses with cinder blocks instead of sticks.
 
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Old 09-26-05, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by supraman215
2. em69 didn't you have trouble raising them when they were completely built?
Nope. But, ovbvioulsy don't try lifting a 10 or 12 foot wall yourself. I find it is easier to get the wall plumb when you raise it as one piece. It is also much stronger as you are nailing the studs through the top and bottom plate instead of toe nailing.
 
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Old 09-26-05, 12:03 PM
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I built mine on the floor too.

I was also concerned about the height issue and here is how I resolved it. I nailed a top plate to the bottom of the joists and then built the wall 1 1/2" low but still had a top plate on them. So I ended up with two top plates. I didn't have any problems moving them into place.
 
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Old 09-26-05, 01:58 PM
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A_unique_name: That is exactly the same as blizzard's suggestion, just reversed. Which I think is exactly the way to go.

However now I'm not sure if I should start with a top plate or the bottom plate?
 
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Old 09-27-05, 11:53 AM
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Is there any reason you should not frame 24" on center (2x4's) for basement walls? It just seems 16" oc is overkill and a waste of wood.
 
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Old 09-27-05, 12:15 PM
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I guess I should

read the entire thread before spouting off
 
 

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