what is the best waterproofer for basement walls

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Old 10-19-05, 10:11 AM
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what is the best waterproofer for basement walls

I am getting ready to finish my basement and was wondering if somebody could tell what is the best selant/waterproofer for concrete block walls?
 
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Old 10-19-05, 10:50 AM
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the best waterproofer for basement walls

Non are really waterproofers, since they can crack and really do not seal existing or cracks or joints between the slab and floor.

The only good method is to have drain tile. If you don't have it just plan on the possibility of having moisture unless you have a unique situation. No wall is watertight.

Corrective items on your existing basement would be to open the joint between the slab and wall and fill with hydraulic cement as instructed on the package.

Wall coatings can help if applied as instructed and with as many applications as recommended.

Dick
 
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Old 10-19-05, 12:18 PM
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Any so-called sealers applied from the inside are nothing more than marketing scams. Internal sealers do not stop water from getting inside your foundation since the outside is not sealed.

The best method for ensuring a dry basement is to do it from the outside.

Install a drain tile, apply a plastic/rubber membrane around the foundation of your home and ensure grading slopes away from the house. If you have these three components, then you should be fine.
 
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Old 10-19-05, 12:38 PM
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What is stated above is true, but if your looking for a moisture barrier, go with Dryloc.
Its widely available, it can be tinted, and it has waterproofing properties that do work, but only if your walls are in good condition.
I used it and it has worked for me, although I would agree you can do more with drain tiles, french drains and proper landscaping.

I did the above and still developed effervescence on my block, so I cleaned the block and applied Dryloc, and it did seal the Block.
 
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Old 10-19-05, 06:53 PM
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I agree that moisture should be stopped on the outside. It is better to prevent the moisture from ever entering the foundation than to stop it from flowing through. That said I have worked for a number of builders that were unwilling to correct the grade, drainage, etc. Drylok has always seemed to do a good job of keeping basements dry.
 
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Old 10-20-05, 11:11 AM
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And to add to it, the water based Drylok actually performs better than the oil based.
 
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Old 10-20-05, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Blizzard
And to add to it, the water based Drylok actually performs better than the oil based.

I question that - I've applied both to water logged walls and was suprized that the oil base both stuck and stopped the water seepage. [latex gets thinned with water seepage while wet] That said I would never use the oil base again if I could get out of it, The odor is both rough on me and any one who occupies the house for a day or two.
 
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Old 10-21-05, 07:00 AM
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I would think putting dryloc on a saturated wall is like sticking your finger in the proverbial dyke. I would imagine if the conidtions that brought the water there in the first place still existed, it would only be a short time before it would bubble and eventually fail. I think of dryloc more as a water vapor retarder. If you have liquid water coming through the wall your fighting a loosing battle with any interior water "sealant".
 
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Old 10-21-05, 02:27 PM
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I've used UGL Drylok on the exterior of a basement wall and it worked very well. The situation may be different from this one. I had an "English basement" - a finished room with the floor only about 3 ft below grade. the wall was unsealed cinderblock and had leaked into the kitchen more than once.

I dug a trench down to the slab/footer and applied 3 coats of drylok to the entire wall. When I refilled the trench, I graded away from the house for about 8 feet. I later added a paver-block patio behind the house and never had another leak (so far). The house is only 18' wide, and attached on 2 sides, so again, this might not work as well in another situation. And call before you dig!

Don't know about the oil-based, but the water based goes on very easily and cleans up well when (not if) you get it on yourself, your siding, and any pipes coming out of the wall.
 
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Old 10-21-05, 03:24 PM
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I've used UGL Drylok on the exterior of a basement wall and it worked very well.
1. you put it on the outside of the wall, a far better application than putting it on the interior.

2. You graded away from the house (which probably would have been effective on its own)

3. You added a barrier whick minimized the water that will even get close to the foundation.
 
 

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