Drylok Application


  #1  
Old 12-15-05, 08:39 PM
DIYRick
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Drylok Application

In finishing my basement is it necessary to apply Drylock to all the walls that I will be finsihing? I have two walls that I will be finsihing that do not face the exterior foundation of my house, but have the garage flooring above.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 06:47 AM
E
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IMO, I wouldn't use Drylok.

Interior sealing of a concrete or block wall sealed will develop a high concentration of moisture inside the wall itself if there is a water problem outside. Interior insulation on top of this interior sealed wall could cause freezing problems within the concrete or between the inside the blocks.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 07:06 AM
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If it's a bad idea to use Drylok on the basement walls, what can you use? I would like to put ridgid foam insulation on my basement walls, then paneling. What would you do to the block wall, put plastic on it, then the insulation?
 
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Old 12-16-05, 07:16 AM
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IMO it is always a good idea to seal the interior block with drylok [or similiar product] I agree that moisture issues are best addressed on the exterior but you don't want moisture to pass through the block, especially when the block is covered up. I always recomend using drylok before covering the wall, even if there are no moisture problems it is cheap insurance against future problems.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 10:29 AM
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If your walls are dry, then Drilock is unncessary.

If moisture is in direct contact with your foundation, then there is moisture present in the concrete wall. It is for this reason, you must be careful about using Drilock as that moisture could potentially freeze within the wall.

If you still choose to apply Drilock, then make sure you do not apply it above the level of grade. If it extends above the level of grade, then any warm moist air which sneaks into the wall cavity will get trapped within your wall cavity. The space above grade is needed to allow any moisture to escape.

If you are using rigid foam insulation, then you do not need a moisture barrier on the concrete wall. However, make sure when you apply the bead of silicon on the back of the board, that it is done in a closed loop fashion. You do not want any air space between the insulation and the concrete wall.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by em69
If your walls are dry, then Drilock is unncessary.


True but it is cheap insurance against any future moisture problems.
 
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Old 12-16-05, 04:10 PM
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Drylok Application

em69 -

Just having moisture in concrete or concrete block will not cause freeze-thaw durability problems unless the concrete is saturated. This is a very basic fact.

This is why all durability tests are conducted on saturated samples only. There is also a very basic difference in the freeze-thaw mechanism between wet cast concrete (ready mix, etc.) and zero slump concrete (concrete block, concrete pipe, etc.). Despite the differences, the concrete must be staurated to cause distruptive internal pressures.

Concrete, by its nature absorbs moisture and equalized the moisture content with surrounding areas. Any barrier on the surface that breathes permits the reduction of vapor pressure from expansion of the moisture as goes through the freezing process.

Obviously, all exterior practices (drainage, etc.) should be done to eliminate the water. The use of a breathing "waterproofer" on the inside will NOT cause damage to the wall.

There has been limited research in North America regarding vapor transmission and freeze-thaw, but the internation test are much more extensive. They support the lack of influence of breathing coatings and the benefits of the concrete mass in decreasing localized failures. there are books that many U.S. & Canadian engineers and researchers are just beginning to comprehend.

Dick
 
  #8  
Old 12-20-05, 10:01 AM
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basement walls

Years ago when I finished the basement in my house, I did not use drylock as we never had a problem with moisture in the basement. However, we did install fixed vents at different points along the wall so air could circulate. Vents were painted to match the walls and was not that noticeable. 13 years later, we've never had a problem.
 
 

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