You steel stud framing guys step inside!!!

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  #41  
Old 01-01-06, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug Aleshire
Klutch,

You can cut studs with a saw (metal abrasive blade) or use multi-purpose metal snips. The snips works the best and is quick. I'd suggest wearing gloves when doing this - sharp stuff can mean stiches when you get cut!

In response to your previous posting, measure along the floor where you want your wall, mark the end locations and snap a chalk line. I have used a plumb bob to locate the top plate directly above. Mark those two locations on the ceiling and then snap a chalk line. This has worked the best for me and others.

Hope this helps!

Thanks Doug. I've put in about 60' of walls, 2 doors and boxed my electrical in the past couple of days. I've snipping the sides of the studs and then bending them over back and forth till the snap apart. I saw that Bob Villa video and they were using a slick tool that you slide the stud in and just snip off the stud where you want it cut (just like a paper cutting tool).


I've been putting the top track in first and then using my plumb bob to mark the bottom. Works pretty good. I keep telling myself over and over that I'm not building a house (in your words).

I have to go pick more track up tomorrow because when my dumba** bought the first batch I forgot that I need it on top AND bottom so my order got "cut" in half... LOL
 
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  #42  
Old 01-01-06, 08:05 PM
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Klutch,

I am unsure of what the tool is called to what you were referring to but I am not a Bob Villa fan! I see too many mistakes and they never talk about the actual costs! Basically deceiving the general public, IMHO, and I then have to re-educate the people to the "real world" of constuction!

Buying such a tool is wasting money. Call your local tool rental store and see what they have. Since you already have 60 ft up, why get the tool now when the snips work the best. Bending back and forth takes time - a good snip will cut this like butter.

Good Luck!
 
  #43  
Old 01-01-06, 08:10 PM
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Don't get me wrong, I'm not a big Bob fan either, they weren't pimping the tool I saw it while they were building the wall. I found the video while visiting my ol' friend Google.

I must have bought crappy snips or something. Mine are just plain ol' aviation snips. Is there a certain type you'd recommend? I went to pick up a set and lo and behold there were natually 50 different kinds
 
  #44  
Old 01-01-06, 08:23 PM
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Klutch,

A good Multi-purpose nip is all you need. You could buy metal shears but sometimes these are too bulky to operate. A circular saw can do a fine job but the noise level is deafening.

Regarding Bob Villa and others that have shows, the problem is that when they do the shows, they instill images of what may not be feasible in different locations around the USA.

I have to advise clients that watch these shows, that we have Building Codes, we have frost levels, we have a BUDGET to contend with. If they don't care about any of that, I sure could do lots of things!

This is where I get so angry at what is portrayed verus what can be done and where. Sorry, it is a frustrating issue and at times clients get mad at me for telling them the TRUTH and not agreeing with what has been shown on TV. TV has not been a good advocate or allie, per say, to many contractors and subcontractors and like me, designers!
 
  #45  
Old 01-01-06, 08:31 PM
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Youch!!!

Hold on man don't burn me alive on ol' Bob. Like I said, I ran across a video that he did while looking for info for putting these walls up. They were using the tool in the background. He didn't recommend it. It was just a labor crew that they dropped in on while working. It's called a channel shear I found out though and expensive.

I hear you on the Bob thing though. I'm a "computer guy" for a living and always have people that want me to fix their problems but their (insert relative or friends name here..) told them it was just so and so and easy to fix. I always reply "if they know what the problem is and how to fix it why are you standing in front of me?" LOL
 
  #46  
Old 01-01-06, 08:44 PM
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Klutch,

Sorry, I meant no offense towards you or others but you obviously know what I mean. You bring up a good point though.

It happens to me as well with what I do for a living. They say, you do your drawings on cad, that must go pretty quick, a click here and there and you're done!! What a joke. If it was that easy, why are they hiring me? Why did the city say, your plans are not acceptable! It's not just making the lines look good but knowing what you can do and can't. The drawing of walls may be easy but the requirements by the local building officials of what must be on your plans is immense. When you need a good set of drawings to ensure that the budget isn't blown and that you get a firm bid from a contractor, you can't have any mistakes. This all takes time, experience and the knowledge to do it right! A bad set of drawings is not a good thing!

My brother has his own computer business and he too has mentioned what you describe. "Oh, I was told that you can do this or that and it is done." or "Why did it cost this much?" What they don't realize, is that it isn't that simple and what one is told by a "wanna-be" isn't exactly the way it goes.

Sorry, you got me going.
 
  #47  
Old 01-03-06, 08:06 AM
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Doug, do you happen to have any diagrams of a T intersection? I'm getting ready to do several and would like to see how the track would lay out as well as the studs.
 
  #48  
Old 01-03-06, 09:40 AM
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Klutch,

I have added 2 more details within my photo gallery - They should help with wall intersections and corners.

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/729705/2/50863178

Hope this helps!
 
  #49  
Old 01-03-06, 09:59 AM
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I must have bought crappy snips or something. Mine are just plain ol' aviation snips. Is there a certain type you'd recommend? I went to pick up a set and lo and behold there were natually 50 different kinds
I would recommend straight cutting(yellow handled) craftsman or kline snips(I'm pretty sure they are made by the same company, Identical except for brand name).

As for the stud cutters you were mentioning, they are a waste of time.
If you are looking to cut studs quickly, buy or rent a chopsaw. You can cut a bundle of studs at a time with them.

One trick to cutting the studs by hand quickly is to cut the ears, bend the stud over, use a utility knife to score the metal, then bend back and forth til it breaks. Scoring the metal will allow it to break usually within 3 bends instead of 10 or 20 that it takes when not scored.

Also, any trick of the trade snapping chalk lines if you're by yourself?
Use a nail or screw on one end and hook the end of the line to it.


You seem to be laying out your basement in an odd fashion(no offense).

Typically the whole job would be layed out, lines snapped for the bottom track( this way you can make adjustments without having to tear up track).
I almost always use reference lines when laying out(helps to keep everything square) instead of measuring off individual walls.
Plumbing up the walls can be done several ways.
Plumb bob or laser(my choice though the ones I use are quite expensive and would be very impractical for a diyer to buy)for taller walls( I've done 30' tall walls).
On walls like you are doing I use a slide level to put marks for my top track and then snap lines.
 
  #50  
Old 01-03-06, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Doug Aleshire
Klutch,

I have added 2 more details within my photo gallery - They should help with wall intersections and corners.

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/729705/2/50863178

Hope this helps!

Not how its typically done, but it will work. Uses 3 too many studs.
 
  #51  
Old 01-03-06, 10:50 AM
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Thanks Doug, that's exactly what I was thinking the studs would look like. 1 question though was I cannot see the track. Would the track piece that is intersecting be overlapped or just butted up against the other track? In other words would I cut the side of the track being intersected into and flattening or cutting the flap off and then overlapping the intersecting piece?


Bigmtk, I know I am doing it kinda weird but my problem is that I'm new to all of this. I've never built anything like this before. I'm not confident that I could lay it all out on paper, mark all the lines out and then just do it. I started on one corner of my basement and am working around, when I get to a point that I will have an intersecting wall or corner I fit everthing loosely so I can change it once I have the next wall layed out.

I know for a fact that my inexperience would cause me to constantly have to redo the lines which would be confusing as hell.
 
  #52  
Old 01-03-06, 10:57 AM
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Oh and my problem with snapping chalk lines is that I'm doing it on concrete so I can put a nail or screw like I could if it were wood.
 
  #53  
Old 01-03-06, 11:32 AM
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sure you can.
Use one of the pins that you use to shoot down the track.
Take the plastic sleeve off of it, tap it in with a hammer, you don't have to drive it deep, just deep enough to hold it in place on your mark. when you are done just pull it out.
 
  #54  
Old 01-03-06, 05:28 PM
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Klutch,

Look at this for stud framing at an intersection. Look to the right and left of the door opening - there are 2 walls that make up the hallway. This shows only 3 used. The track is not cut - it is done similar to wood framing at intersections.

I agree with bigmtk that the illustration shown does use 1 extra stud. You should only need 3 per intersection OR the option is to get some 6" studs for those intersections. This reduces the number required.

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/729705/3

Even though trying to do a nail into concrete to hold one end of the chalk may work, it will be hard. It is much easier to do a full layout of your basement on paper, then with assistance, layout your walls and get help with the chalk line. It would be a real time saver.

Hope this helps!
 
  #55  
Old 01-03-06, 06:11 PM
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So basically you just slide the tracks up against each other and don't overlap them at all? I don't know how it's done with wood either unfortunatly.

So which stud isn't needed in that diagram? I think I know which one but am not certain. I could see the one I'm thinking of being a good point to get them to all interlink with screws but maybe that isn't needed?

I have a ROUGH diagram of the basement but again it's ROUGH. Most of my basement is perimeter walls with a closet and the only other walls are 4 surrounding the HVAC so I've just been building them as I go.

I'll probably just keep hollaring at the wife to come hold the chalk line. One thing I've done is putting the top track in and then using the plumb bob and putting a mark on the floor ever 4 or 5 feet. So far each time I've done this my chalk line lands directly on center so it seems ok.

Doing it the way I am affords me ample time to think my next move out completely before acting. I'm not by any means and expert so don't it on paper wouldn't help me that much IMHO because I have to see directly what I'm working with because of my inexperience. So far I've laid 65 feet of wall, 2 doors and 4 corners and have yet to have to start over so I think I'm working through it ok. I'm getting ready to run into the closet walls which will require a T intersection so I though I'd check. I hope to get some photos of what has been done thus far soon.
 
  #56  
Old 01-05-06, 06:59 PM
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Glass Blocks/Electrical Boxes/Runner

Klutch: You've inspired me! Your progress from just a week ago has moved me to finally get on with finishing our basement.
Doug/bigmtk: Thanks for the great support & time you put into the forum.
I'm using a program to draw out the basement (roughly an L-shaped area with 1000 sq ft, walk-out basement with sliding glass doors and 2 windows on the long side.) The buddy who is helping me pointed out I need to maximize natural light.
Q1: Would a 4' half-wall of 6" metal studs on, say 8" centers, be strong enough to hold courses of glass block up to the 96" height? The idea is to let light into my office from the mudroom's sliding glass doors. If not, I'm thinking about jalosy windows.
Q2: There's no significant cost difference for electrical boxes required for metal vice wood studs, right?
Q3: Klutch, did you opt to go with the wood runner on the floor under the tracks?
Thx!
Ike
 
  #57  
Old 01-05-06, 07:17 PM
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PurdueIke,

Glad the information helps!

1. Metal studs 12" on center with a 2x4 top plate would do it. we are only talking 4' feet of "glass block"? This would be heavy

Have you considered Hy-lite block (acrylic) for this area? If you are, then 16" on center is all you need. These are much lighter

http://www.hy-lite.com/architect/pro...truction.shtml

You may not want the 2x but I would do it this waydepending on how you are laying this all out. I stress I do not know how you are doing this - is this framed in or is there an open end to the glass block?

2. There is a increase in cost but not that much. Look at the prices at any big box store.

3. We will let Klutch answer this.

Hope this helps!
 
  #58  
Old 01-05-06, 07:22 PM
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Good to hear I drug someone else into this!!

I didn't opt for the wood under the bottom track, won't know for a while if I regret it but what the hell.
 
  #59  
Old 01-06-11, 09:11 PM
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steel stud framing follow up

Klutch,
Looks like this thread hasn't been active for quite a while. Wondering how things turned out. I'm starting to finish my basement with steel framing and have been googling for tips. Ran across this thread and bingo! It is full of very helpful info. I was even surprised to see the links from Doug and bigmtk still work!! I'd really be interested in hearing how your project turned out. Thanks again guys for the useful info.
 
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