Top/Bottom plates


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Old 01-05-06, 06:32 AM
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Top/Bottom plates

Should I be using a double top plate in my basement framing even if the walls are non loadbearing. Also... is one PT bottom plate enough for nail space for sheetrock?
 
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Old 01-05-06, 08:08 AM
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If you're building the wall on the floor and then raising it up (which is probably the easier way), then you'll need either a double top or double bottom plate. From what I gather, you're not required to double either, but if you built the wall full height on the floor, you wouldn't have room to stand it up.

I asked similar question about my plan to use DryCore subflooring, and was told that if you're putting up the walls before you install the subfloor, you'll probably want the extra nailing space on the bottom.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 10:01 AM
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from my experience....for non loadbearing basement walls you don't have to double up. The main idea for those walls is to connect floor and ceiling and give the sheet rock somewhere to nail. One plate at the bottom is typically sufficient to fasten the sheetrock too. I am not a professional, with my experience this is sufficient for what you are doing. Others may agree/disagree.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 02:28 PM
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If you choose not to use a double top plate, be sure the single plate you use ends up edge to edge under a floor joist above. If not, you will have to scab the joint in order to keep it from moving. Load is one factor of a double top plate; the other is to offset the joints you have making long runs; but the most important one is if you use studs which measure 92 5/8", you will come up short if your wall is a full 8' tall. However, most basements are lacking in height, so it shouldn't be a problem. The PT lumber on the base plate is adequate to attach sheetrock. Being a trade nail driver, if I can get into a house as it is being framed, I like to install a short 6" high piece of 2x4 to the studs at door openings and corners. The reason for this is attaching trim molding at the base level after the sheetrock is up and the door trim is up. Door trim, quite often takes up the stud space on door framing, so you wind up without anything to solidly attach your base molding in the corners. I don't give up too many tricks, but you can have that one. Good luck with your framing and remodeling.
 
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Old 01-06-06, 06:05 AM
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1. No, not needed
2. Yes
 
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Old 01-06-06, 11:27 AM
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Thank you all for your responses. They are a big help!
 
 

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